For Efficient Facade Design & Engineering: Collaborate With Your Supply Chain

By Akio
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A new method of project delivery is emerging in AEC.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: A new method of project delivery
is emerging in #AEC @3DSAEC @azahner

Through new digital platforms, companies like A. Zahner Company are setting the example for how an integrated supply chain can significantly reduce rework on highly complex projects.

When the experts responsible for fabrication and installation can provide insight early in the design process, and all parties have the tools they need to collaborate closely throughout, construction waste can be reduced.

Owners are enjoying the benefits of collaborative project teams, which include:

  • reduced waste
  • stronger adherence to schedules
  • reduced costs

Collaboration is improving through the adoption of cloud-based 3D modeling solutions. Such tools assemble and empower teams across multiple organizations and geographies to create a single, live source for project creation.

By ensuring all project stakeholders are on the same page, from design through execution, owners gain tremendous transparency into a project’s feasibility, and all AEC parties have access to the knowledge they need to successfully speed projects to market.


To learn more, download the Dassault Systèmes whitepaper:

Supply Chain Integration and Collaboration for Efficient Facade Design and Engineering


clicktotweetClick to Tweet: For Efficient #FacadeDesign & Engineering:
Collaborate W/ Your Supply Chain @3DSAEC #AEC

The Advantages of Prefabrication for AEC

By Patrick
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This post is part of a series of articles found in “Prefabrication and Industrialized Construction,” a Dassault Systèmes whitepaper.


Where prefabrication is possible, a number of benefits make these systems attractive to building owners.

Prefabricated systems can lead to reduced labor costs, safer projects, and fewer delays—and often results in an overall higher quality product than can be achieved with traditional stick-built projects.

 

Workers construct a modular structure in a manufacturing facility. ©iStock.com/EdStock

Workers construct a modular structure in a manufacturing facility. ©iStock.com/EdStock

 

Reduced Labor Costs

Prefabricated systems simplify the installation process, requiring fewer workers onsite to complete a task.

Because the most complex components are assembled in a specialized manufacturing environment, prefabrication reduces the need for skilled laborers. Skilled trade people need only be used onsite for the final connection of systems, such as wiring or ductwork.

Improved Safety

Not only does prefabrication lower labor costs, but by shortening the amount of time spent onsite, laborers are able to get in and out more safely.

Tweet: #Prefab shortens the time spent onsite so laborers are able to get in & out more safely. @3DSAEC #AECClick to tweet: “#Prefab shortens the time spent onsite
so laborers are able to get in & out more safely.”

Laborers working in a controlled factory environment don’t have to brave jobsite hazards such as ice or winter chills, unsafe access to electricity, or dangerous heights. A factory-controlled environment also makes it possible to supply components and equipment where the worker needs it, rather than having workers moving parts through an active jobsite.

Minimized Delays

Sequencing for stick-built projects follows a typical pattern: each trade moves in to complete its portion of the building once the previous trade has completed its work. That means an unexpected delay in ductwork installation can push back wall framing, which then moves the schedule for the electricians who are already working around another project, and so on.

Prefabrication minimizes the need for coordination among subcontractors because electrical, ductwork, and other necessary components are installed within the wall as it’s being fabricated, requiring minimal onsite coordination.

What’s more, because the majority of work is done inside, there is no need for delays due to weather, and shift work can be performed around the clock.

Improved Quality of Finished Project

Prefabrication work is typically completed in a specialized, centralized factory. Suppliers might use a permanent location or a temporary warehouse close to the jobsite to reduce the logistics of transporting finished products.

A major advantage of working in this enclosed environment is that it allows for greater quality control than is possible on a typical jobsite. Producing these complex systems in a manufacturing environment keeps jobsite dust, dirt, and other contaminants out of sensitive systems. It allows for more oversight of each step of the process.

Once completed systems arrive onsite, surveying devices such as transits help installers to precisely locate where each component needs to be installed. Expert tradesmen must simply connect the final pieces.

Expanding Benefits

While not every project—or every system within a project—may be able to take advantage of prefabrication, today’s new technology allows even highly custom systems to take advantage of these benefits to workers and building owners.

Tweet: Advantages of #Prefab for #AEC @3DSAEC Click to tweet this article:
“Advantages of Prefab for AEC”

Patrick Mays, Expert Business Experience Consultant AEC at Dassault SystèmesPatrick Mays, AIA

With over 30 years of AEC experience, Mr. Mays is part of the core team driving the AEC industry strategy at Dassault Systèmes. Mr. Mays was the General Manager for North America at Graphisoft, and served as CIO at NBBJ Architects where he led the firm’s transition to BIM in the 1990s.

 


Whitepaper: Prefabrication and industrialized construction

Related Resources

Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience by Dassault Systèmes

Download the full whitepaper: Prefabrication and Industrialized Construction

Building Lifecycle Management Fosters a BIM Level 3 Approach for End-to-End AEC Collaboration [Whitepaper]

By Marty R
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Industrialization techniques have been commonly used in Manufacturing industries for decades. Now the use of Industrialized Construction in AEC is expanding to help improve planning, design, construction, and assembly for increased sustainability, optimized operations, lower costs, and greater safety.

Whitepaper

With the growing adoption of BIM, companies can further benefit by implementing a Building Lifecycle Management (BLM) system. BLM puts into practice a BIM Level 3 approach that enables a highly efficient Extended Collaboration model based on Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) and Manufacturing industry best practices.

Dassault Systèmes has just published an industry paper proposing an Extended Collaboration model for AEC, based on Manufacturing industry best practices.

Extended Collaboration Model for Design, Construction & OperationsClick to expand

The concepts covered include:

  • How a Design Review process helps connect architects and building product system manufacturers to reduce the number of issues that must be formally clarified by RFIs and submittals during project delivery
  • How Process Simulation can reveal even minor integration errors, illustrate which processes are the most cost- and time-effective, demonstrate how prefabrication will affect a project, and generate highly accurate sequence data
  • How collaborative processes and advanced technologies streamline operations and improve project outcomes, illustrated by examples and client case studies
  • How to unlock BIM data, making it “transactable” across the extended project team, to achieve BIM Level 3
  • The limitations of BIM Level 2 point solutions
  • BLM system benefits, and features of the Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE® platform and applications
  • How to approach the implementation of a BLM system

… and more.

Download the paper: “End-to-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3: An Industry Approach Based on Best Practices from Manufacturing”

Tweet: Building Lifecycle Management Fosters #BIM L3 Approach for End-to-End #AEC Collaboration [Whitepaper] @Dassault3ds http://ctt.ec/B9X97+Click to Tweet this article