How do companies inspire ideas and drive sustainable innovations?

By Elodie

What can be the impact of emerging technologies on the future of industries? That is the question at the heart of a new 3-part series created by CNBC Creative Solutions in partnership with Dassault Systèmes, first published as an Advertisement Feature on CNBC.com.  While the stories explore very different industries, they contain an underlying theme of how 3DEXPERIENCES can impact the future. This program runs in parallel to the one developed in partnership with BBC. Discover the TV commercial promoting this series now.

The Future of Connected Car

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What will the car of the future do for you? Contemporary reports on connected cars are focused on the technology, but what about the impact of these innovations on our lives? This series explores how autonomous cars may change the driving experience as well as improve efficiency with a focus on traffic, safety and pollution.

Discover this first story through videos, infographic and news articles on CNBC.com now.

The Future of Retail

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Customization will change the way we shop.  To adapt to customers demand for a more personalized shopping experience, the retail sector will change dramatically over the next two decades. In this series, we discuss how innovations such as delivery drones, 3D printers, and virtual mirrors may alter the way we buy everything we need – and our expectations about how goods should be custom designed to fit our exact needs.

Discover this second story through videos, infographic and news articles on CNBC.com now

The Future of Finance

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The 2008 global crash has drastically changed the financial services sector. How far are we from the transparent world that customers are demanding? In this last program, we will explore how innovation and technology may completely change the finance world for consumers and major organizations with more transparency, better choices, and improved risk decision.

Discover this last series in the coming weeks.

Preview the series in our new commercial that gives a glimpse into Dassault Systèmes vision for the future and how 3DEXPERIENCES can shape our lives. Watching TV? Look for the spot through July 31st on CNBC and on CNN.

Keep Calm and Innovate Sustainably: 10 Tips for Sustainable Design

By Aurelien

Keep Calm And Innovate SustainablyNowadays, sustainable production and consumption still remain an exception. Consumers demand more sustainable products, yet they often lack information about the real environmental and social impacts of their purchases. The problem for designers and product managers: shifting to sustainable innovation is not an easy path.

According to the European Eco-Design Directive, more than 80% of the environmental impact is determined at the design stage.

Would you like to take the jump to eco-design? This SlideShare presentation will drive you through 10 tips to get started with more sustainable design. So keep calm, and innovate sustainably! ;-)

Wanna see these tips in action on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform? Watch the video below:

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Parts of this SlideShare presentation were inspired by the SPIN/Leapfrog Project, a joint initiative from TU Delft, the Vietnam Cleaner Production Center (VNCPC), the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and Dassault Systèmes. Learn more about the project through the Leapfrog Project blog series.

Designing Solutions for a Less Wasteful Life

By Catherine

Written by Catherine Bolgar

Lego bricksThe future of design looks a lot like Legos.

Modular design allows a product to be assembled from easily replaceable or interchangeable parts. Most people are familiar with it in architecture and furniture. However, it’s also being applied to other things, from nuclear-power plants to shoes, submarines and guitars.

Modular design is gaining traction thanks to the convergence of several trends. Mass customization is pushing industries—from consumer products and electronics to automobiles—to find ways to deliver customized solutions without sacrificing economies of scale. Tighter environmental regulations are prompting companies to find ways to reduce waste caused by their products. And consumers, fed up with a throwaway society, are looking for products that manage to last yet which can be upgraded as needed.

Take mobile phones: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that Americans disposed of 129 million mobile devices in 2009 and sent 11.7 million for recycling.

I was thinking about stuff and why we throw it away,” says Dave Hakkens, who invented Phonebloks, a modular design for a mobile phone. “All our electronics are disposable. If a bike has a flat [tire] you fix it, you don’t throw it away. But if a phone part is broken, you have to throw [the phone] away.”

old cellphonesIn wanting to reduce electronic waste, Mr. Hakkens considered several alternatives. “Should I make a phone that could last 100 years?” he asks. “I like technology and the way it evolves and can improve our lives. If I make a phone that lasts 100 years, I won’t be able to upgrade it. But if it has modules that I can upgrade, I can throw away only a little part.”

Unbeknown to Mr. Hakkens, Motorola Mobility had been working on a modular mobile phone as well, called Project Ara. Google, which acquired Motorola in 2011, is expected to unveil its prototype of Project Ara next year. The goal: a phone that can be customized and upgraded at will.

Mr. Hakkens, who came up with the idea of Phonebloks as a graduation project from the Dutch Design Academy in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, has linked up with Project Ara.

It’s hard to make a phone and it’s a tough world—you need patents, lawyers, you have to compete with big companies,” he says. “I don’t want to build a phone myself. I don’t want to start a phone company. I want to push industry to start a new way to make phones.”

Phonebloks

Mobile phones might be just the beginning. “The Phonebloks concept could be extended to all electronic devices: cameras, TVs, computers,” he says. “You could have building-blocks for electronics, with components that can be exchanged among them and can be upgraded.”

In such a world, it’s possible that new entrants would design the ultimate camera module, while others would specialize in the smallest, lightest battery, and still others would focus on packing more capacity into the memory module. Just as now, you can buy specialized software to meet your needs: in the future, you may be able to buy pieces of a phone to put together the mobile device best suited to your uses.

While some companies choose modular design for competitive advantage, others might find themselves pushed in that direction by environmental-protection laws. The Consultative Commission on Industrial Change (CCMI) for the European Economic and Social Committee of the European Union is working on ways to stop planned obsolescence.

For example, a decade ago the EU banned chips in printer cartridges that signaled the cartridges were empty when they still contained ink. Now it’s taking aim at things like batteries in phones that are impossible for people to replace themselves—and which are so expensive to have fixed by the manufacturer that most people just buy a new phone instead.

“We’ll have less waste,” says Jean-Pierre Haber, delegate of the CCMI consultative committee. “We now create 500 tons of waste per person per year.”

The CCMI proposes five requirements for consumer goods:

  • a minimum two-year guarantee
  • replacement parts available for at least five years
  • certification on the nature and life cycle of all products, no matter their country of origin
  • manufacturer-trained repair shops, which could generate 450,000 jobs in Europe
  • an orientation toward an economy of functionality, so that rather than buying a product, you buy a service, and companies would see incentives in designing goods that don’t break.

Overall, the thrust is to promote the design of goods that can be repaired or upgraded, rather than requiring purchase of a completely new item.

The online community iFixit, which encourages repair over replacement, suggests design features such as product cases that are easy to open, or that have doors to allow access to the inner workings; making the most breakable parts the easiest to access; making some internal components standardized and replaceable by commodity parts; making repair instructions free and publicly available.

We need lots of innovation,” Mr. Haber says. “But we need innovation that gives added value for the consumer and that doesn’t create problems for the environment.”

We need innovation that gives added value for the consumer and that doesn’t create problems for the environment Tweet: “We need innovation that gives added value for the consumer and that doesn’t create problems for the environment”

For more from Catherine, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join The Future Realities discussion.



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