Virtual Archaeology

By Alyssa
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Our world is full of unique art, objects and structures that serve not only cultural icons but also as priceless, irreplaceable parts of history.  But earthquakes, floods, war, time and humans threaten such sites, putting them at risk for harm or even complete elimination.

Thankfully new tools can capture these physical sites in digital form. One company leading this trend for digital preservation is California-based CyArk, a nonprofit organization focused on creating 3D archives of the world’s most precious and at-risk cultural heritage sites for preservation and education.

CyArk trains groups around the world to help identify vulnerable sites and embark on the process of digital preservation.  The technology is small enough to fit into a backpack.  Many of these teams are being trained in war-torn areas such as Syria and Iraq, where there is a significant risk of conflict having an impact on artifacts.

Check out the latest issue of Compass to see examples of some of CyArk’s 200 projects in more than 40 countries across all seven continents.  You’ll also discover what some museums and other organizations are doing to help determine how future generations know and remember past cultures, and how technology like virtual reality headsets are making the content more powerful and more accessible.

Could mining asteroids save Earth?

By Alyssa
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Natural Resources are critical to society.  Without them, virtually everything that defines the modern world would disappear, including the houses we live in, the cars we drive, the technology we use to communicate and save lives –  even the shoes we wear and the toothpaste we brush our teeth with. .  However, the future of mining natural resources is uncertain.  We have already extracted the easy-to-access materials, and those of the highest grade.  But as the population of Earth continues to grow, demand for natural resources continues to mount. There is no quick fix, but there are a lot of ideas on how to approach the challenge. One of these involves mining asteroids.

It might sound like science fiction, but both public entities and private companies are actively working on figuring out if asteroids can be a new source of the materials we need on our planet.  Scientists think asteroids hold promise because they are made of the same minerals as Earth.  NASA, for example, has created an Asteroid Redirect Mission with the goal of extracting a boulder from a Near Earth Asteroid and bringing it close to the moon so that astronauts can study what it can offer.  Private companies are also actively involved: space exploration company Planetary Resources is aiming for an exploratory launch by 2020.

The concept of mining asteroids may be capturing the most attention, but there are other paths too, such as leveraging more autonomous machinery or encouraging more conscious consumption.  This isn’t something any one group alone can accomplish.  Mining companies, communities, environmental groups, and individuals must work together to find new approaches.

“If we want a vibrant economy with globally high quality of life and also to protect Earth for future generations, we all have a responsibility to get involved and find a balance that works,” says Marni Rabasso, vice president of Natural Resources at Dassault Systèmes.

Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform can play a key role in finding new solutions, due to its ability to create virtual worlds in which ‘what-if’ scenarios can be simulated to visualize, design and explore new technologies.

In conjunction with CNBC Catalyst Content Studio, Dassault Systèmes created an in-depth look at the challenges ahead in mining our natural resources and the different options that could provide us new sources for what is needed to run our world.  Check out the videos and articles here.  Then come back and tell us: what do you think is the best approach for mining more natural resources?

Transforming disadvantaged communities with healthy, affordable food

By Alyssa
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Two of America’s most celebrated chefs separately identified a problem. Daniel Patterson – the Michelin two-star chef of San Francisco restaurant Coi – and Roy Choi – street food king and founder of Kogi – both recognized that there are many ‘food deserts’ in the United States: parts of the country with little of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas and largely due to a lack of grocery stores, farmers’ markets, and healthy food providers.

A chance meeting in Copenhagen resulted in LocoL: a fast food restaurant (and roaming food truck) that provides tasty, nutritious and affordable food to communities that have limited healthy choicesRather than try to go outside of the fast food culture, the chefs embraced the tried-and-true concept but focused on offering healthier food options while retaining the low price point.

The result: a restaurant that serves the community nutritious meals, while providing jobs that can build skills in an underemployed workforce.  LocoL’s founders also aim to drive more kindness, compassion and positivity into the communities in which they are located.

Come learn more about what inspired the chefs in an interview that Compass conducted with Patterson, and how they continue to evolve the menu and their long-term goals and vision for LocoL.  You’ll also find there a link to a video that takes a close-up look inside the Watts location, allowing you to virtually experience the food and atmosphere.

 



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