#Rosetta: 3D-Modeling and 3D-Printing Comet #67P

By Fred
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On November 12, 2014, Philae will land (or not!) on the Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet! Also known as “67p” or its nickname “TCHOURI”.

The Rosetta mission started 10 years ago by the European Spatial Agency (ESA), went through more than 6 billions kilometers, and Rosetta engineers will hope to make space history by landing the “Philae” robot on the surface of this icy comet for the first time, the comet being about 2.4 miles (4km) wide. You can follow the latest news on the ESA website, this a real challenge, a world first!

Thanks to many photos took by the Rosetta cameras while in orbit around the comet, a 3D model of the comet has been reconstructed based on images from the OSIRIS and NAVCAM cameras.

67p comet photos

Because roughly 30% of the ‘dark side’ of 67P/C-G has not been resolved and analysed fully yet, the shape model is very incomplete over those regions. As a result, some of the derived parameters for the comet are only best estimates at present.

3DS Fablab worked hard to create 3D Printed parts from the 3D model generated from photos, and for this special event, hosted by “La cité des Sciences” in Paris, in which 3D prints will be offered to VIPs invited to witness this unique event live. Using the Form1 printer from FormLabs, the result is quite impressive, and will give attendees an opportunity to better feel and understand the shape and surface of this comet. Watch the video of the project below:

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Dassault Systèmes is proud to be a partner of this event, but you too can 3D-print the comet by downloading the 3D file provided by the ESA on the MadeIn3D Community!

The event will be held at La Cité des sciences et de l’Industrie, in multiplex with ESA center in Darmstadt, Germany and the space museum in Toulouse, France. People will be able the see the first landscape from the comet landing viewpoint, and get the first scientific data transmitted by Philae. This moment should be of great emotion! The event program should begin on November 12, 2014 at 3.30 PM Paris time (exact hour can vary, you’ll understand why :-) ). Till then, you will want to watch this fantastic short film directed by Oscar-winning Tomek Bagiński and starring Aidan Gillen—Littlefinger of Game of Thrones—about the importance of the Rosetta mission:

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Comet photos courtesy from ESA. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team.

Live from Farnborough Airshow 2012: it’s all about Experience

By Aurelien
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Hi! We’re live from Farnborough International Airshow, a major event for the Aerospace industry. For those of you not attending the event, we thought you might be interested in following a dedicated Farnborough newsroom we prepared for you using Netvibes technology :) You will find there live tweets, press articles and blog posts from the event. We’ll also come up with a few blog posts this week! :)

So today was the first commercial (Qatar Airways) in-flight display of Boeing’s “Dreamliner” 787:

Seeing the 787 reminded me of this interview where our own Aerospace VP Mich Tellier mentions Boeing’s focus on the “passenger experience” as a starting point of their approach:

What is new is how Boeing approached the customer experience. They said, “Okay, I’m not going to focus on what we’ve been doing for the past 30 years.” They were not merely going to improve the seat cost and availability model, which is the economic model for the airline. They said, “I’m going to look at passenger experience.” […] They wanted to increase humidity and reduce cabin altitude to 4000 feet from its current 8000 feet. That would kill a metallic fuselage, which is one of the reasons they chose a composite fuselage.

Putting the consumer experience (e.g., increasing humidity in the cabin for improved comfort as aforementioned) at the heart of the innovation process has dramatic impacts on the way the aircraft and interiors are specified, designed, and tested. I’ll try to address some of those points in the upcoming posts.

What do you think? Would love to hear your thoughts about it.

 

Out of This World Engineering

By Tom
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EXPERT Re-entry Vehicle Thermal FE Analysis - Courtesy Dutch Space

You may have read my earlier post about the End of a Space Shuttle Era – the Space Shuttle’s last flight, where I hinted at what NASA was going to do next. I thought I’d update you a little, sharing work from other companies using SIMULIA’s simulation tools on projects that could decide the future of space travel.

Most recently in the SIMULIA magazine – Realistic Simulation News, Dutch Space shared with us how they used Abaqus to analyze the new re-useable spacecraft test bed (EXPERT) being designed by the European Space Agency. They focused on testing their Thermal Protection System (TPD), which is fitted to the nose-cone, the area of the craft that’s subjected to the brunt of the heat during re-entry.

The nose cone TPS is a very challenging component to design. It has to be structurally strong as well as being able to withstand enormous changes in temperature. Because of this, it’s made up of two parts; a ceramic matrix composite (which handles the extreme heat very well) and a conical metal after body.

Abaqus is able to handle the complex virtual testing of this component, testing temperatures and forces that are very difficult to replicate here on earth

Inflatable Lunar Habitat - Coutesy ILC Dover

Inflatable Lunar Habitat - Coutesy ILC Dover

One of our other customer’s ILC Dover also shared their story. With the prospect of traveling further than the orbit of our planet always an option, ILC Dover is looking to help support our (relatively) fragile human life forms on other planets. They started back in the 50’s and 60’s by designing space suits for the Apollo missions, but have taken things one step further with inflatable habitats.

I guess you could consider this to be a really big space suit capable of looking after multiple humans, but the inflatable habitat is designed to be a home away from home for traveling astronauts. In this example, the inflatable house is pictured in a lunar environment, using Abaqus, however, has enabled them to test the environmental conditions and the inflation process of the structure in multiple scenarios for any atmospheric condition imaginable.

The habitat is designed to fold down into the smallest space possible for transportation and then inflate to become several times the folded size.

To find out more about these two exciting projects, check out the full articles here:

Dutch Space – Simulating Spacecraft Launch and Re-entry

ILC Dover – Camping on the Moon – or even Mars

Best,

Tom

@3DSTom



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