Realistic Simulation Supports Expansion of the London Underground

By Akio

Dubbed “one of the most complex tunneling projects in the U.K.,” the Bond Street Station Upgrade (BSSU) project is being carried out to satisfy growing traffic demands within London’s busiest shopping district, the West End.

Upon its completion, Bond Street Station’s daily passenger numbers are expected to rise from 155,000 to 225,000.

A project this complex in nature has to consider the existing tunnel infrastructure, as well as the stress and strains imposed by the surrounding soil layers for the development of new tunnels.

Dr. Sauer and Partners was contracted to provide such tunneling expertise. The company took on responsibility for preliminary-to-detailed design and construction on all BSSU sprayed concrete lined (SCL) tunnels.

Tweet: The Bond Street Station Upgrade utilized realistic #simulation to test preliminary tunnel designs. @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/X4UWh+Click to tweet: “The Bond Street Station Upgrade utilized
realistic #simulation to test preliminary tunnel designs.”

 

Using FEA simulation, they were able to virtually test the ground through which the tunnels are being dug alongside the existing tunnel structures.

Model1.000

This realistic assessment enabled them to improve upon the preliminary design, as well as bring greater confidence to the overall approval process.

To learn more, read the case study, “Tunnel Vision” to see how realistic simulation plays an important role in tunnel excavation.

We also encourage you to download the whitepaper by Ali Nasekhian, Sr. Tunnel/Geotechnical engineer at Dr. Sauer and Partners, which highlights the merits and shortcomings of large 3D models in tunneling.

Tweet: Realistic #Simulation Supports Expansion of the #LondonUnderground @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/dU4NO+

Click to tweet this article.

 


Related resources:

White Paper: “Mega 3D-FE Models in Tunneling Bond Street Station Upgrade Project”

Case Study: “Tunnel Vision”

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction Solutions

SIMULIA Solutions page

The Living Heart Project: Remarkable Progress Achieved Through a Common Goal to Improve Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes

By Helene

LHP-zSpace-Demo-Zygote-Heart-hi-res_600

Steve Levine, Chief Strategy Officer for SIMULIA Dassault Systèmes, is passionate about bringing cutting edge technologies from different disciplines to doctors and the patients they treat. In a recent recorded presentation at the 3DEXPERIENCE Forum in November 2014, Levine outlined the need for utilizing these technologies to build better human anatomical models, stating that 95% of all medical devices released to the public have never been tested on the human body.

The Living Heart Project was launched publicly in May 2014 to develop the world’s first realistically functioning computer model of the human heart. This project has made tremendous progress, and the video referenced above includes Levine and Dassault Systèmes President and CEO Bernard Charlès announcing a 5 year collaboration with the Food and Drug Association to develop cardiovascular testing paradigms.

The Living Heart Project relied on Dassault Systemes 3DEXPERIENCE platform to bring together more than 100 cardiovascular specialists from 30 organizations to develop and test the model. In the video, Levine commented that at the outset, bringing together researchers, doctors, medical device companies, and regulatory agencies was a challenging task as information is siloed. The 3DEXPERIENCE platform allowed the specialists to crowdsource the heart model, with each bringing their expertise without sacrificing intellectual property.

The video shows impressive visualizations of The Living Heart model that are, pardon the pun, heart stopping. Levine points out in his presentation that it is the first four chambered 3D heart model that is based on commercially available, validated technology. He also showed that the model can be viewed in different ways, highlighting mechanical stresses important for indications such as heart failure as well as visualizing electrical conductivity which is important for studying heart arrhythmia. Levine also showed how collaborations within Dassault Systèmes were instrumental to visualize The Living Heart in 3D, as a “walk in” model. Additionally, 3DEXCITE provided true to life coloring and features to aid medical students and surgeons.

Levine went on to tell the story of Emily, a girl born with a heart that is literally “backwards,” with right and left ventricles transposed. As the earlier 3D models Levine showed in the presentation illustrated, the heart is not symmetrical, so this defect has caused Emily to have 4 pacemakers by the age of 20. In May 2014 an animated video showed Emily’s story and how the The Living Heart would help diagnose and treat her. Emily’s story is particularly touching for Levine to relay, and the reasons are best explained by him, so we encourage you to watch the entire video of his talk to learn why.

Levine talked about the collection of resources available at 3ds.com/heart which helped to describe the vision of the Living Heart Project to collaborators and to illustrate their progress.  He sees the project as a model to unite other healthcare specialists, medical device companies and regulatory bodies to collaborate around aspects of human anatomy or disease models. The 5 year collaboration with the FDA will increase the number of participating organizations from 30 to 100 and will continue to involve the Medical Device Innovation Consortium of which Dassault Systèmes is a key sponsor.

How to Take Charge of Your Mechatronic Product Development: The Smart Products Case study

By Estelle


Remote Home Control

The move to producing smart products has been gaining traction in the last few years. Consumers want more out of the products they buy: more flexibility and adaptability, connected and even more portability and mobility. On top of the electrical, mechanical and electronics components that you would find in traditional products, smart products are run by software that also gives rise to more innovation and features that were not possible before.

If the consumer market is opting for a refrigerator that sends you a SMS of the things you need to buy at the grocery or a car that drives itself, then how are manufacturers affected by it?

Businesses making smart products know that these stuffs are also more complex to design and create than their more traditional counterparts.  What this means is that you would need the services of more experts and more professionals in order to bring your products to market.  You also need to synchronize the varied design lifecycles involved in the manufacturing process.


Mechatronic Product Development

Other challenges include a longer time to market, quality issues, redesign and rework, more costs when it comes to product development, and problems with software development.   All of these carry a negative impact on the businesses, especially your profitability.  If you are behind schedule and fail to deliver your smart product on time, then it might mean lower sales and lower profits for you.

Fridge And here’s the thing, complexity will only continue to increase. Not only are consumers opting for smart products, they need something new or something better over time.   In the future, they will no longer want a refrigerator that just lists down its content and tells you what to buy, they will want one that does that AND suggest dishes that you could cook with all the ingredients you have in the refrigerator.

So your manufacturing processes would constantly become even more complex.

 

The good news is that you can take charge of your mechatronic product development by using better processes and using technology to provide integration, traceability and visibility platforms.

How do you do this? Here are some steps.

  1.  Set the goal and make sure that everybody is aware of what these goals are so that they all work towards it. To be effective in setting goals, you should consider what are needed to achieve that goal.  To illustrate, imagine that you are working on a new smartphone, do you know what your customers are expecting it to have and offer?  In this case your goal would be to create a smartphone that is useful to your customers without cramming in too many features that your customers would not use.
    Now here’s the challenge: product requirements from different domains often have different systems and formats and this leads to fragmented information.  This in turn leads to overlooked requirements or over designed products.
    What you need is a way to consolidate your requirements that are drilled down to actionable details.  These requirements need to be version-controlled so that it could go through the entire product life-cycle, become guidelines for your product’s design and used for product validation.  You can also save time if you can keep this centralized document visible so that you could also update it in the future.
  2. Working with your requirements, you need to come up with a conceptual design. Getting the conceptual design right would help you avoid expensive reworks and redesigns when you find a major flaw along the way.What you need to do is systems modeling and find a way to simulate systems behavior to help your design engineers come up with optimized concept products.
  3.  Validate your product often. Smart products are quite complex so you have different factors that you need to analyze.  When you can simulate the system’s behavior, you can easily validate your product to show that you have made the right decision when it comes to design.  It also helps your designers to analyze, interpret and report results.
  4.  Design by discipline. If you have laid all of your products’ requirements, you can easily have different parts of the product designed simultaneously.  The challenge at this stage is that different disciplines usually mean different tools and different design lifecycles.  However, parallel design efforts can help you cut the time to market.What you need to do is make sure that every member of your team knows what the others are doing through collaboration and communication.
  5. Revise when necessary. Always address errors and bugs in a timely manner, so you might want to manage these changes as well.  The thing with changes is that a change in one component would mean that designs for the others would also change.  As such it is imperative that everybody working on the design of your product knows all of these changes.

In all of these steps, a mechatronics collaboration platform can  help you do what needs to be done to make your smart products even more competitive.

Tech Clarity White paper

 

If you want to know more on how to master the development of your smart products, advance your business processes and systems maturity, and improve your products quality and time-to-market, download the Tech-Clarity white paper here.



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