Three Years of 3D Perspectives

By Kate

There are moments in life that call for particular reflection:  birthdays with a zero, weddings, etc. 

As I’m experiencing one of these moments, moving on to new professional adventures, I’d like to share my perspective on some topics we’ve been discussing on this blog the past three years. 

How have the worlds of 3D and product innovation evolved since 2008?

3D
For sure 3D has become more mainstream, although the ultimate sign will be when kids use 3D software to design their Mother’s Day decorative vase gifts and print them—both actions from home.  Some signs that we’re getting closer to widespread adoption, take LG’s recent Optimus 3D announcement.  Optimus 3D is a smartphone with a glasses-free 3D screen and 3D recording camera.  

Or what about 3D food printing?  And I’ll bet you at least thought about asking Santa for a Sony 3DTV last year . . . but you probably changed your mind because the quantity and quality of 3D content isn’t ready yet.  Rest assured it will be as soon as enough creatives have embraced 3D as their expression medium. 

Innovation
I’m not sure innovation is something that can evolve, but I do feel comfortable saying that the processes to capture and manufacture innovation have progressed.  With social computing platforms bleeding into the workplace, new fangled ideas are digitally captured, commented on, morphed into even crazier but ingenious concepts, and sometimes, when a business model can be agreed upon, produced and sold. 

As Orange Labs Sociologist Dominique Cardon said at our recent Design in Life event, “Bottom-up innovations must be local and personal, and because they are personal, their inventors are driven to share with others.  This is when the innovation process begins.”  Personal innovations for the greater good. 

With mobile technology conquering our hearts and pocketbooks, smartphones and tablets are slowly replacing the pulp-constituted idea notebook.  Armed with them at all times, we can now plug our ideas directly into the digital grid, rather than first writing them down on that sheet of paper that may get lost with our socks. 

Reality
I’d say how we consider reality has definitely changed.  Virtual is no longer considered fake or marginal.  We’re starting to trust it.  So much that we’re opting to test agricultural innovations, the safety of new mobility concepts, and Dr. Seuss-like building designs as real-life dress rehearsals.  Lifelike experience

We’re using devices to augment our physical world experiences and obtain complimentary information, even as urban tourists in some cases.  Digital has changed our notion of what’s really possible, and what you see is not only what you get.  Your cereal box is not just about cereal. 

PLM
When the likes of Oracle start taking interest in Product Lifecycle Management, I’d say we’re up to a new level.  This technology is no longer just for IT geeks. 

PLM is C-level strategic.  And once the boardroom decides to go for it, designers, engineers, purchasing, marketers, the supply chain, consumers, and, IT geeks all find their place and solution within the PLM network.  PLM, the united colors of making stuff.

I will miss you once I’m gone.  But rest assured there are great people that will keep 3D Perspectives alive and feisty.  And most important there’s YOU. 

Like my High School Principal Dr. Jewel always said at the fall welcome assembly, “What you get out of Needham B. Broughton is a direct correlation to what you put into it.”  So replace my alma mater with 3D Perspectives and go for the purple and gold.  Oops, sorry, a pep rally slip.  Just go for the gold. 

I wish you the best and look forward to our next encounter, online or offline.

Warmest regards,

Kate

Twitter @KateBo

Defining a Formula for Success: Enginuity PLM

By Rosemary

When was the last time a product from the grocery store, convenience store or your local pharmacy wowed you?  Was it the package, how the product performed or like food products or a lotion, was it the product inside.  Was it taste, texture, or what that product promised to do for you: digestive health, allergy relief, smooth skin? 

For companies that develop formulated products, the ‘stuff’ inside is often the kernel of intellectual property.  It is often the ‘thing’ that makes you come back and buy that product again and again.  For example, what is the real difference between Coke and Pepsi?  Consumers have a strong voice in their preferences.  As such, these are both coveted and secret formulas.

 Think about it, every time you go into the grocery store you’re confronted by an array of choices: different products, a variety of packaging choices, sustainability considerations, and price.     And while you are ultimately buying the entire experience, it’s what’s inside the package that really counts.   It’s that experience that determines whether you’ll keep buying it and, as importantly, defines how you’ll talk about it with your friends and family.

Companies in formula-based industries like cosmetics, personal care, pharmaceuticals and others know this well.  At Dassault Systèmes we’ve always done a pretty good job at thinking about the ways in which to design future products and how to best help our customers innovate in more efficient ways and at an accelerated pace.    

We’ve taken the lessons learned over the last 30 years in key industries like automotive, aerospace,  high tech, and applied them to help a variety of the world’s leading companies in new PLM markets likelife sciences and consumer packaged goods. However, while we’ve focused on product simulation and key business processes for data management, packaging design, product simulation and labeling, what about the recipe or formula that actually goes into the box, bottle or tube?

For many of our customers what goes into the packaging is equally, if not more important in the consumer’s purchase decision.  In the world of formulation, the most successful companies are those that are able to take relatively inexpensive raw materials and transform them into a product that the consumer is willing to pay for. In fact, for formula-based industries like cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and consumer packaged goods often the formula IS the product – the kernel of their intellectual property

With such an important role to play in a company’s success you’d think that formula design and management would be an integral part of a company’s product lifecycle management.

Formula design and management has been handled by formulators and chemists who have often managed the data separately from other key functions like package design, engineering and manufacturing who typically use technology to support their work. Formulators don’t just make one version of a formula either.  They create a core formula and then make modifications based on varying manufacturing capabilities and regional/local regulatory requirements.  For global organizations, managing these regional regulations makes their jobs increasingly complex.

What does this mean practically?  Let’s take suntan lotion; a manufacturer may have to produce more than 10 different formula variations of the same product to satisfy all of the health and safety requirements. That’s not to mention the different packaging and labeling requirements as well. Managing all of this is extremely time consuming and expensive.

This is why Dassault Systèmes’ acquisition of Enginuity PLM, announced last week, has the potential to change the way that formula-based companies manage their business and interact with their consumers.

As a leader in formula management, Enginuity has a strong track record of working with some of the world’s leading companies like Procter & Gamble, Merck and Revlon to tie formulation back into the business.  For the first time Dassault Systèmes customers will be able to manage formula design as another key business process and importantly directly integrated in the broader enterprise product lifecycle

This will enable companies in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, personal care and other business segments to innovate better, faster and smarter than ever before.  This is a game changer!

To learn more follow this link or if you have specific comments or questions please contact me directly at rosemary.grabowski(at)3ds.com.

Best,

Rose

ENOVIA Market Strategy

Intercultural Analysis of PLM

By Remi

culture cultural difference trompenaars hofstede d'iribarne

Hey guys!

I’m crazy about sociological and intercultural theories. So analyzing 3DS’ sector this way is kind of second nature to me and I basically woke up one morning with the question: could PLM be a tool to help different cultures better work together? I thought about it and the answer is… come on did you think I would spill it that easily?! Let’s start with the beginning first! ;-)

Something interesting among cultural differences is varying attitudes regarding action. Without being stereotyped (there have been very serious studies made by Hofstede and Trompenaars) we can say that Anglo-Saxon people tend to be more action-oriented, while Asian people spend more time thinking what to do before acting.

To give you a quick example, Philippe d’Iribarne elaborates on a merger between two companies that failed because of conflicting decision making approaches:

• The French company wanted the deal executed quickly, because the French hierarchal system only put a few people in the decision loop, thus shortening the decision process.

• On the other hand, the Swedish company was slower at making decisions as they were more into a collaborative system. Democracy was more important to them and led to decisions made by a larger group of people, which took much longer than the French.

This quick summary of the case study reveals that, depending on our culture, we will approach Decision and Action very differently. And because in this example the merger failed, it illustrates how powerful these differences can be.

What’s the link with PLM?

This strategic business technology allows its users to see what they want without actually doing things for real. Consequently, people can think and do at the same time.

It allows action-oriented people to get results quickly, and thinking-oriented people to take the time they need. Both will see what they create very accurately, and at the same time it will still give enough time to think things through.

To me, it seems that in this way PLM brings different cultures closer in the working process… Maybe it is the early days of a bridge-building for cultures that goes beyond 3D as a universal language!

What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi



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Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.