Intercultural Analysis of PLM

By Remi

culture cultural difference trompenaars hofstede d'iribarne

Hey guys!

I’m crazy about sociological and intercultural theories. So analyzing 3DS’ sector this way is kind of second nature to me and I basically woke up one morning with the question: could PLM be a tool to help different cultures better work together? I thought about it and the answer is… come on did you think I would spill it that easily?! Let’s start with the beginning first! ;-)

Something interesting among cultural differences is varying attitudes regarding action. Without being stereotyped (there have been very serious studies made by Hofstede and Trompenaars) we can say that Anglo-Saxon people tend to be more action-oriented, while Asian people spend more time thinking what to do before acting.

To give you a quick example, Philippe d’Iribarne elaborates on a merger between two companies that failed because of conflicting decision making approaches:

• The French company wanted the deal executed quickly, because the French hierarchal system only put a few people in the decision loop, thus shortening the decision process.

• On the other hand, the Swedish company was slower at making decisions as they were more into a collaborative system. Democracy was more important to them and led to decisions made by a larger group of people, which took much longer than the French.

This quick summary of the case study reveals that, depending on our culture, we will approach Decision and Action very differently. And because in this example the merger failed, it illustrates how powerful these differences can be.

What’s the link with PLM?

This strategic business technology allows its users to see what they want without actually doing things for real. Consequently, people can think and do at the same time.

It allows action-oriented people to get results quickly, and thinking-oriented people to take the time they need. Both will see what they create very accurately, and at the same time it will still give enough time to think things through.

To me, it seems that in this way PLM brings different cultures closer in the working process… Maybe it is the early days of a bridge-building for cultures that goes beyond 3D as a universal language!

What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi

Customer Value at the Core of Companies’ Thoughts

By Dominique
High-Tech mosaic

People & Technology at the heart of Innovation

Mike Demler, Technical Editor — EDN, recently concluded in his article, The design-to-cost imperative and customer value , that ‘Too many companies in “mature” competitive industries blame customers or the tough economy for driving down prices. The lesson from the most successful companies is to continually deliver greater value. Companies should focus more on how their engineers can design for value rather than obsess over balance-sheet-driven cost-cutting strategies, in which layoffs and outsourcing are all too prevalent.’

The focus here is on innovation versus purely cost reduction.  Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is a significant element to the equation as it impacts not only costs reduction, but more importantly provides the means to deliver top-line growth.  Another more recently and extremely critical element to foster innovation is the move by Dassault Systemes (DS) to tie social innovation with the product development process, also known as PLM2.0 as supported by the DS V6 online platform.

V6 facilitates that connection between “Customer” and “Company” in a LifeLike manner all the way through to the engineering, to which Mike Demler is referring.

Consumer Focus + Technology Leadership + Business Process Agility: these are the drivers for DS in the High-Tech industry as expressed by our customers and that we drive with V6 capabilities.

It’s comforting for me to see that we all share a common vision to place consumers and consumer value at the core.

Cheers!

Dominique

Burning Questions at #DSCC2010 – Free Roadsters, Robot Autographs and Exalead

By Derek

Some time ago, I tweeted that The Burning Question for DSCC 2010 was “What the heck is Exalead?”

Well, I’m here to apologize.  That was wrong.  Totally and completely wrong.

That’s not the burning question at DSCC 2010.  There are other burning questions related to DSCC 2010:

  • Will Tesla Motors give out free Roadsters to every attendee?
  • Will the Robot Whisperers from DELMIA be signing autographs?
  • Is PLM the spicy mustard of innovation on the chicken sandwich of product development?

All valid questions but . . . I’d like to focus on three Exalead-related questions for this post:

1.    What is Exalead?

Exalead is a global provider of search and information access software for the enterprise and Web.  It is the only search platform on the market designed from the ground up for both usages.  Exalead’s technology powers its Web search engine, the world’s third largest at 16 billion pages indexed.  Exalead’s platform makes it the leader in Search Based Applications or SBAs.  Because of this, analyst IDC calls Exalead a “disruptive” company to watch, and Gartner upgraded Exalead from Visionary to Challenger in its Information Access Technology Magic Quadrant.

2.     Why should I care about Exalead?

Analyst report after analyst report shows that finding information is a crucial part of efficient product development.  Too much searching and not enough designing is a common complaint.  Exalead and its SBA platform address that problem head on.
OK, so better info access.  Great.  But why is Exalead a smashing information access glue for PLM?  Morgan Zimmerman, Exalead’s VP of BizDev, in a previous blog post, said it quite succinctly:

“While enterprise SBAs are often used to provide database-style information access and reporting – without the usability and performance constraints of direct database access – online and mobile SBAs often ‘ mash-up’ unstructured and structured content to create a pertinent and engaging experience for consumers.”

Therein lays a key to the importance of SBAs and Exalead’s technology to PLM:  structured and unstructured data.

Exalead’s heritage as a hybrid enterprise and Web search company makes it a perfect fit in the ongoing evolution of social media, social innovation and PLM 2.0.  PLM isn’t just inside the four walls of the enterprise anymore.  Collaboration is extending outside the enterprise and into the Web and social media-sphere.  You’ll see Dassault Systèmes’ answer to this phenomenon at DSCC 2010 in Orlando and at the upcoming ECF near Paris.

Bruno Delahaye, Dassault Systèmes’ ENOVIA and collaboration lead , connected the dots in a previous post:

“Search-Based Applications will modernize information access and give plenty of perspectives for all our brands, with a specific emphasis for ENOVIA. [For example,] instead of deploying sourcing services centered on data already identified in their engineering bases, our customers could extend the search to CRM, ERP and even more interesting, selected suppliers’ Web catalogs. Sourcing parts or completing a BOM with metadata can now truly leverage the power of the Web and the depth of the information outside the company firewall. A true game changer and certainly a unique competitive advantage.”

3.  How will Exalead impact my PLM strategy?

That’s a pretty big question.  Take a look at the DSCC event agenda.  There will be several opportunities to examine that question, both in the General Sessions, where Exalead will be discussed and in in individual tracks where SBAs and Exalead’s relevance to customers’ PLM implementations and strategies will be demo’d. 

So the best way to get answers to THIS burning question is to attend DSCC! ;-)

You might get the impression from this post that the only burning questions at DSCC 2010 will be about Exalead.  Not true.  There will be as many burning questions as there are attendees.  And all of them will be relevant and critical.  In part, this is one of the purposes of DSCC 2010:  to answer those questions.

What are your burning questions for DSCC?

Best,

Derek



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Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.