PLM Implementation Partner

By Wendy

You’ve selected the best solution, but do you have the right implementation partner?

With an ever increasing competitive market, companies in any industry are relying more and more upon their ability to innovate their product or service in order to create a revolutionary and incredible experience for consumers. The types of products we strive to create are those that actually enhance or sometimes change lives. Also understanding that it’s not always coming up with something new, but quite often producing what we already do, better. To do this requires a symbiotic environment that infuses technology, collaboration, and data with human preferences, needs and desires. Companies recognize the need to transform their business in order to evolve and remain profitable.

With a realm of potential solutions available, it’s not only about selecting the right enterprise system but integrating and deploying it successfully. Successful implementation and adoption is critical to achieving game-changing status for any company. While innovating business minds are anxious to make necessary changes, they are also reluctant to budget or spend the time to do it properly.

The Cost of Bad Implementation

Many are skeptical that they need help and believe they can shop for a ‘better price’ when it comes to implementation. With the ever-increasing complexity of an enterprise solution, it’s common to overlook essential business processes and the need for platform integrations which can ultimately create a delay in deployment.

Finding the right partner with the expertise, experience and skill set is very important to avoid implementation failure and deliver expected benefits. In your search, consider some of these tips to finding the right partner:

  1. Include implementation services into your overall solution budget. PLM deployment failure often occurs at the very beginning of the initiative. A good understanding of the implementation services costs required will help you to deliver the full PLM technology roadmap.
  2. Ask for certification. Look for partners, consultants and system integrators with a proven track record implementing the specific technology your solution is based upon through the use of industry best practices and methodologies.
  3. Get requirements documented at the beginning. Qualified service providers will help align your organization’s strategy and business processes with a properly defined PLM implementation roadmap.
  4. Look for proof of project management methodologies that utilize a consistent and defined approach for project planning, execution and management.

A strong competitive advantage relies on a few simple things – providing consumers with the products they want, when and how they want them, and at the price they are willing to pay. The challenge is enabling your organization to work effectively to create products that meet consumer demand and beat your competition to market. To properly deploy a PLM solution requires a team of experts such as Dassault Systèmes Industry Services that can help ensure the technology meets your business and timeline objectives.

Have you budgeted for your next solution implementation? Can your solution services provider help you identify the highest value potentials for business transformation and provide comprehensive recommendations?

How to Foster Open Innovation: The 5 Things You Need to Know

By Estelle

 

Open Innovation by Dassault Systèmes

It was a little more than a decade ago that Berkeley professor Henry Chesbrough started developing the concept of Open Innovation at the Center for Open Innovation, where he was also a director.  Back then, Chesbrough’s idea of Open Innovation relates to pooling platforms or tools to help foster innovation and share ideas.  And because businesses experience more collaboration today, Open Innovation is much more relevant in the current business climate.

It is no secret that business environments have become increasingly complex.  You do not only have to work with scarce resources and tight budgets, but you also need to keep up with changes in technology – with new ones emerging every day.  You also have to foster sharing of knowledge and intelligence while also facilitating collaboration when you are co-innovating or co-creating.  And collaboration and co-creation are no longer limited to employees, but now includes other parties such as customers, SMEs, suppliers, associations, startups and other entities in the business ecosystem.

 

How do you promote Open Innovation in your organization?

 

  1. Bring together your internal and external projects. You can use just one platform that will enable you to get ideas from outside your organization while also letting outsiders test out the ideas of your employees.  Not only will you be able to share ideas and intelligence easily, but you also get to test ideas more quickly, as well as get new ideas from everyone.

 

  1. Use both offline and online methods when you are co-creating. Efficiently getting new concepts for your products will need the use of both offline and online methods.  For example, you can get employees, experts, customers, developers and/or designers to help you design your product. As such, you would need to ensure that your offline and online campaigns complement one another.

 

  1. Run better and less risky contests. Run contests to help you generate ideas as well as getting around challenges.  Moreover, contests are also a good opportunity to develop Open Innovation for your company.  To lessen the amount of work, the risks as well as to make it more successful, it is best to work with a non-competing company or a group of companies.  You would be able to spread the work while also establishing a collaborative mindset, while also learning to protect your intellectual property and remaining agile.

 

  1. Manage your ideas effectively. It is very important to manage your ideas every step of the way.  When you allow everyone to contribute ideas, it will be very easy for some people to monopolize the entire process.  Early on, you should be able to pinpoint the key people who are qualified to contribute ideas at different stages of the project.

 

  1. Collaborate with others from different industries with different specializations. The thing with Open Innovation is that it naturally lends itself to disruptive innovations.  To be more competitive in today’s business environments, your innovations should not only come from or pertain to your core business.  You should be able to manage complex collaborations with people and companies from different industries.  For example, Smart City needs to bring together different players that belong to different industries, such as architecture, transportation, telecommunications and other urban infrastructure companies.

These are the 5 most important ways to foster Open Innovation in your organization. Follow these key tasks and your enterprise will be on its way to simpler business processes.

 

Visit  Ideation & Concept Design for High Tech Web Page   or download the article about Open Innovation in the new edition of Compass Mag.

Moment of Truth in Designing a Differentiated Product

By Estelle

This post originally appeared at Core 77

Watches

The MP3 player wasn’t a new thing when the iPod came out, nor was the iPhone the first smart phone,” observes John Maeda, Design Partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and former president of the Rhode Island School of Design. “But they were the ones that made you give a damn.”

What Maeda describes in that 2011 Huffington Post article is the First Moment of Truth (FMOT)—that moment when a consumer walks into a store, faced with several comparable products and has to make a decision. They pick up MP3 player one, MP3 player two, hold them in their hands and, in that FMOT, decide which one they will purchase. In a world where many products are relatively similar in terms of technology, price, performance and features, design is that differentiator.

That differentiator is what companies like Karten Design try to create. “How do you get mindshare? How do you stand out? How do you create “sticky” stuff? We use design research,” says Stuart Karten, Principal and Founder of Karten Design, a product innovation firm made up of scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, and designers who go out and spend time with the people for whom they are designing products.

CATIA Natural Sketch

We are trying to understand their habits and ceremonies, so that we can create products that fit in with the way people live their lives, making them easier to adopt,” explains Karten. “Most importantly, we are trying to find unmet needs—common needs that are persistent in people’s lives, but aren’t being satisfied through the current products, or even the product categories that are available on the market. We use unmet needs to drive new ideas.”

For consumer electronics, that means not only identifying a target audience and creating a product for them, but also following through on the promise of what the product does. That second piece, known as the Second Moment of Truth (SMOT), is vital to creating a positive, lasting impression with a consumer. “That’s the gauge that you have to use to make a truly successful consumer product,” shares Karten. “It has to look good to earn that first moment of truth, and then you have to deliver on it with a product that holds meaning and value in a person’s life.”

Watch

To ensure a positive FMOT and SMOT, Karten and his team go back to where they start the ideation process—with people. “Take things and put them in front of users quickly. That design principle is embedded in our company,” says Karten. “We want to get feedback from people earlier and quicker in the design process to find out what stands out, which ideas resonate functionally and emotionally. Go to the people.” Earlier feedback means faster iterations, shortening the timeline it takes to put a product on the shelf.

That process involves creating a series of virtual and physical low fidelity mock-ups, iterating and repeating, increasing the fidelity with each round. Virtual prototypes can give focus groups a very realistic visualization of the final product, saving time and money before moving on to physical prototypes. “Thanks to new technologies such as 3D printing, the iterative design process can now happen very quickly and cost effectively, so it’s taking off a lot of time in the product design process—across the board,” says Arieh Halpern, Life Sciences Industry Business Consultant Director at Dassault Systemes. Dassault Systèmes works to create solutions like *Ideation & Concept Design*, which keeps track of requirements and manages concurrent focus groups, helping shorten the timeline from research to market. “You’re now able to work on the same concept design with your focus groups in real time, do your drawings in real time, and then convert those into 3D prints,” explains Halpern.

Watch

Shortening that timeline makes a huge difference in the field of consumer electronics, where a shorter timeline means putting that product in the hand of focus groups for that FMOT and SMOT that much sooner. In a field where design is the differentiator [PDF], that time can make all the difference in the success of a product. “With a consumer electronic product, you have to create something that somebody wants. You have to steal the show,” says Karten. “That’s the first moment of truth.” If a product doesn’t deliver on that first moment of truth, it might be the last.

Want to create your Connected Object  ? Register to the new edition of  MADEin3D™ contest, “Cup of IOT”, the theme is Internet of Things !

CupofIoTThis time again, we are lucky to have cool sponsors & partners with us to organize this worldwide competition: Withings, Nodesign.net, Prodways, ES Numérique, and CapDigital. The winner’s will thus be nicely rewarded !

Register to the community to enter the contest now!

 



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