Challenges Driving the Industrialization of Construction

By Akio

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

A monumental and historical study conducted by the National Research Council of the National Academies on behalf of NIST outlined the challenges and obstacles facing the construction industry.

BREAKINGWITHTRADITION2-200x300

Fragmentation of the Industry

“The sheer number of construction firms (760,000 in 2004) and their size—only 2 percent had 100 or more workers, while 80 percent had 10 or fewer workers—make it difficult to effectively deploy new technologies, best practices, or other innovations across a critical mass of owners, contractors, and subcontractors.

Tweet: Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer. @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC http://ctt.ec/eTAeP+Click to tweet: “Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer.”

The industry is also segmented into least four distinct sectors—residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy construction.

Interconnectivity and Interoperability

  • Its diverse and fragmented set of stakeholders: owners, users, designers, constructors, suppliers, manufacturers, operators, regulators, manual laborers, and specialty trade contractors including plumbers, electricians, masons, carpenters, and roofers.
  • Its segmented processes: planning and financing, design, engineering, procurement, construction, operations, and maintenance. Each process involves different groups of stakeholders, and shifting levels of financial risk.
  • The image of the industry—work that is cyclical, low tech, physically exhausting, and unsafe—which makes it difficult to attract skilled workers.
  • The one-of-a-kind, built-on-site nature of most construction projects.
  • Variation in the standards, processes, materials, skills, and technologies required by different types of construction projects.
  • Variation in building codes, permitting processes, and construction-related regulations by states and localities.
  • Lack of an industry-wide strategy to improve construction efficiency.
  • Lack of effective performance measures for construction-related tasks, projects, or the industry as a whole.
  • Lack of an industry-wide research agenda and inadequate levels of funding for research.

The industry is moving to address these challenges.

To learn how, download the white paper “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Heather Moore.

Tweet: How does the history of industrialization inform #AEC industry? @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @AgileConst http://ctt.ec/9cna5+Click to tweet: “How does the history of
industrialization inform #AEC industry?”

This post is an excerpt from the white paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Dr. Heather Moore. Commissioned by Dassault Systemes and prepared by MCA Inc., this whitepaper focuses on industrialization of construction industry.

It maps out the construction industry challenges, relates the history of industrialization in the manufacturing industry, and summarizes five critical aspects and approaches.

 

Tweet: Challenges Driving the Industrialization of #Construction | @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/0eQKb+Click to tweet this article

 


Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Download Lean Construction Solution Brief

White Paper: Industrialization of the Construction Industry

MCA® Website

The Case for Industrialization of the Construction Industry

By Akio

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

Like many other industries the construction industry is under constant pressure to improve productivity, reduce cost, and minimize waste in the operation.

While the productivity in the manufacturing industry has improved by four hundred percent (400%) over the last century, the construction industry’s productivity has, in the best case, stayed flat or turned negative.

Tweet: Problem: Over the last 100 yrs productivity in the #AEC industry has, in best case, stayed flat. Solution: http://ctt.ec/mf0SU+ @3DSAECClick to tweet: “Problem: over the 100 yrs productivity in the #AEC
industry has, in the best case, stayed flat. Solution: industrialization”

One main reason for the improvement of the manufacturing and other industries’ productivity is the “Industrialization” of those industries. Industrialization of any industry will rely on the following five factors:

  1. Management of Labor
  2. Management of work
  3. Lean Operations
  4. Modeling and Simulation
  5. Feedback from the source

The driver for establishing and applying industrialization in manufacturing was the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Currently no known association is leading this mission in the construction industry.

A marked result of the advancement in productivity of the manufacturing industry is the relative price of an automobile.  Whilst the cost of an automobile has gone from 140% in 1910 of the average national per capita income in the United States down to 33% in 2012, the cost of an average dwelling has gone up from 333% to 619% of per capita income during the same period.

Tweet: Since 1910 automobile production cost decreased 75%. The cost of a dwelling has doubled. Time to industrialize @3DSAEC http://ctt.ec/Urcfa+Click to tweet: “Since 1910 automobile production cost decreased
75%. Production cost of a dwelling has doubled. Time to industrialize”

This post is an excerpt from the white paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Dr. Heather Moore. Commissioned by Dassault Systemes and prepared by MCA Inc., this whitepaper focuses on industrialization of construction industry. It maps out the construction industry challenges, relates the history of industrialization in the manufacturing industry, and summarizes five critical aspects and approaches.

Download the whitepaper and start accelerating the “Industrialization of the Construction Industry” through lessons learned from manufacturing and other industries.

Tweet: The Case for Industrialization of the #Construction Industry @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/Uz_OK+Click to tweet this article

 

Akio MoriwakiAkio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes’ head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART

Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Download Lean Construction Solution Brief

White Paper: Industrialization of the Construction Industry

MCA® Website

Robotics MEGA-Trends at School

By Tony

IMG_0129

 

 As I posted recently in this manufacturing blog, robotics is trending in a big way, but not just in industry. And schools across the globe are making sure that students are well prepared for this huge wave of automation, robotics and technology coming in the very near future. Schools are not only teaching technology in the classrooms, but are organizing teams and having students compete in different robot competitions. These competitions help students learn and excel in science and math through teamwork and competition. Students learn real-world problem solving by building and programming a robot to compete against other robotics teams. Programs such as FIRST Robotics and FIRST Lego League help to propel students forward. They also support the schools underlying initiative called STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

It takes all kinds of community support

Professionals from many different walks of life have chosen to take on the challenge of coaching these after school teams to help young scientists and engineers further their skills. These robotics teams are very popular with the kids today. In fact, they are so popular that most schools don’t have enough teams or coaches to support the number of students that are interested. While Robotics is definitely mega-trending,, there is a shortage of adult leaders to coach and mentor these young scientists.

Remember why you became an engineer?

Coaching a team gives me such a great feeling of achievement that I cannot understand why anybody would not want to become a coach or support one of these teams in their own community. These young people are so eager to learn and grow, and technology comes to them so naturally. After all, they have been raised around technology their entire lives, so building and programming devices comes easily to them. I love helping these young engineers grow and thrive using technology. I also like being a role model. Because I have a career in robotics, you could say I have Rockstar status. When the team gets tired or frustrated, I’ll try to shift their focus away from the challenges and look at the bigger picture. I start telling stories about my experiences and what it’s like to work with robots. I show pictures and short videos about all the exciting things that robots can do. I love to see their eyes open wide when their brains start imagining the mechanical wonders that computers and mechanical devices can achieve. Dreaming is a lot of the fun for kids, and science and technology teaches us that dreams can become reality. When it comes to the field of robotics, there’s no end in sight. When I see technology stories in the news, I think about all these fine young students that have the technology bug. It occurs to me that technology and the robotics industry definitely have the best days ahead. So I am truly excited when I talk to school kids about technology. I tell them with the utmost confidence that robotics, science and technology have a lot to offer and they should reach for the stars and dream big. That’s what I did.  I have been very fortunate to have a career in robotics, automation and technology. There truly is nothing more exciting than working in a high technology industry that’s so strong and innovative. It’s also refreshing to know that the growth in this industry seems to be finally hitting its stride.

To see more about trends in robotics, visit our community at:
https://swym.3ds.com/#community:179
To see the report The Rise of Robotics by the Boston Consulting Group, visit:

https://www.bcgperspectives.com/content/articles/business_unit_strategy_innovation_rise_of_robotics/



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