How Will Automation Change the Job Market?

By Alyssa
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Since the 1970s, automation has eliminated the jobs of millions of bank tellers, retail cashiers, travel agents, airline front-desk workers and manufacturing employees.  As automation becomes more widespread across our world, more jobs such as truck drivers, airline pilots and even medical doctors are now at risk.

Business-FutureofWorkSince the Industrial Revolution began replacing workers with machines in the late 18th century, technology has been changing the nature of work. For every painful job loss, however, the economy generally created one or more new jobs in more advanced industries. Displaced workers had to retrain for the new jobs, but jobs still existed for those willing to learn new skills.

But with today’s cutting-edge technologies – artificial intelligence, robots, automated big data analysis, the Internet of Things, nanotechnology and 3D printing, among others – many experts believe the world is at an important inflection point that may change work so dramatically it will become virtually unrecognizable.

How many jobs are we poised to lose?  Is your job function at risk? What will be the impact on society?  To discover more, “The Future of Work” in the new issue of Dassault Systèmes Compass magazine.

 

Hyperconnected Business in the Age of Experience

By Alyssa
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Hyperconnectivity isn’t simply a connection of things but rather the invention of a lifestyle. For the first time ever, human beings aren’t just exploring the existing reality: thanks to virtual worlds, we are at the same time imagining, mapping, modeling and engineering new environments.  These networked communities are creating disruptive opportunities throughout the business world.

Compass9-Cover

 

The new issue of Dassault Systèmes’ corporate thought-leadership magazine, Compass, focuses on Hyperconnected Business in the Age of Experience.  A hyperconnected business model allows a company to bring together minds, ideas, solutions and information to unleash possibilities and imagine a world that didn’t exist before.  It explores questions such as: how will we inhabit the extended, hyperconnected world, and how will we live, work, produce, move, and interact in an increasingly networked society?

 

As the Internet of Things (IoT) becomes more widespread and raises the level of customer experience, a hyperconnected economy is emerging.  Communities will regularly collaborate to solve challenges.  Every company will need to rethink its fundamental assumptions about the business it is in, the services it provides and its relationships with customers, competitors and the world at large.

This issue of Compass features multiple stories about hyperconnected business, including a look at what companies like GE are doing to leverage the increasingly connected business that results from IoT. It also explores how the digital revolution may be contributing to a sluggish global economy and threatening the future employment of huge swaths of workers.  We also hear from experts such as Robert C. Wolcott, professor, executive director and co-founder of the Kellogg School of Management’s Kellogg Innovation Network (KIN) at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

Robert Wolcott

Robert Wolcott

In our emerging competitive environment, business isn’t just about being connected or collecting data. Everyone’s connected.  Everyone has data.  What you do with it to understand and serve customers every moment, real-time –that’s what matters.  It’s a completely different mindset and way of running a business.”

 

We invite you to read this issue now to discover more!

Can We Trust the Internet of Things to Protect Us?

By Valerie C.
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Trust Internet of Things

Within the next decade the internet could connect as many as 200 billion things—and not just machines such as cars or household appliances, but anything that you can fit a chip or sensor into—including humans. These devices, collectively known as the Internet of Things, should make life simpler, even healthier, but can we trust them to look after us?

It’s 6 am on Monday 1 October 2025. The device on your wrist has sensed that you’re waking up so it sends a message to your coffee machine to start brewing. You delay the coffee and go for a run instead. While you’re pounding the pavement, the sensors in your earphones detect an irregular heartbeat. The device sends an ECG readout to a cardiologist. He sees that the arrhythmias are just harmless ectopic beats and decides to take no further action.

Back home, you have your well-earned coffee and put the empty cup in the dishwasher. The dishwasher is full, so it starts running. A sensor detects that the appliance is due for a service. It makes the appointment with an engineer and books a date in your diary, which you later confirm. A couple of decades ago, dishwashers were one of the biggest causes of house-fires, but not anymore. The internet of things (IoT)—devices connected to each other over the internet—has made the world infinitely safer. From self-driving cars to smart pills that measure our health from the inside, the internet in 2025 has become a custodian of our health and safety. But have we been wise to give the reigns of responsibility—that we once took hold of ourselves for things like driving or administering medicine—to a device?

Read the Full article to get the answer!

If you want to go further on the topic of the IoT, you can read “What’s next in the Internet of Things?.



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