A New Model for Manufacturing Innovation

By Valerie C.
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by Werner Krings

The Austrian Economist Joseph Schumpeter argued that industries must incessantly revolutionize their economic structure from within. I interpret this statement to mean that manufacturers, especially in the High Tech industry, must continually strive to innovate with better or more effective processes in order to build new products.

Innovation is a core attribute of successful High Tech manufacturers, impacting every aspect of the business–economics, business profitability, product design, technology, and engineering best-practices, not to mention overall brand value.
Innovation impacts growth

Manufacturing innovation can mean the use Lean and other cost reduction strategies. Increasingly, it means automation and digitization of manufacturing as we move toward the era of the Digital Factory and big data analytics. And, In today’s global landscape, innovation must include the ability to easily replicate processes across sites to ensure higher global quality standards and greater control, visibility and synchronization across operations.

How do you get there?

A key requirement for global innovation is a unified production environment across facilities. High Tech manufacturers that use different processes and production systems in their various facilities will have difficulty achieving innovation– effectively blocking all of the potential benefits. When different plants use different MES systems, for example, there can be little agility, as every change becomes a custom IT project.

Improve operations processes across sites

This is why High Tech manufacturing leaders have moved toward unified and standardized systems, so that process changes and manufacturing agility can be achieved faster and more easily. In such an environment, global shop floor operations can be unified through a Center of Excellence, which can then ensure comparable and measurable manufacturing standards on a global scale. As they say, you can’t improve what you can’t measure.

Measuring Innovation

Innovation can (and should) be measured on an organizational level. The implementation of manufacturing intelligence solutions is often justified by this single function, as part of a manufacturer’s quest to achieve better visibility across operations. The ability to measure is greatly enhanced when it is part of an overall innovation strategy, underpinned by unified technology.

High Tech manufacturers will want to measure several aspects of innovation, such as business measures related to profitability, innovation process efficiency, or employees’ contribution and motivation. Measured values might include new product revenue, spending in R&D, time to market, quality scores for suppliers, and growth in emerging markets.

Manufacturing Innovation

What is pivotal is that innovation must align with corporate strategy and global manufacturing performance in order to ensure continuous growth and return on investment. A well-defined innovation program, combined with an IT infrastructure that supports global agility, is essential for High Tech manufacturers that want to compete and grow in a sustainable fashion, now and in the future.

Now there’s a solution for greater visibility, control, and synchronization of operations. Visit the Flexible Production solution page and read the flyer to find out what a flexible global production platform for manufacturing can do for your High Tech enterprise.

Visit Dassault Systèmes’ Booth at DAC in Austin

By Matthew
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Dassault Systèmes is a Key Exhibitor at Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2016 taking place at the Austin Convention Center in Austin, TX on June 5-9!

53dac_logo_mediumStop by and visit Dassault Systèmes at DAC 2016 in Booth #548 where we’ll be hosting customer sales meetings and featuring our High Tech Silicon Thinking Industry Solution Experience.

The Design Automation Conference (DAC) is the premier conference devoted to the design and automation of electronic systems (EDA), embedded systems and software (ESS), intellectual property (IP) and automotive systems/software.  6,000 attendees come from all over the world to learn about products and solutions that bring additional value to the industry. This audience represents decision-makers at all levels of the buying process from the leading semiconductor, computer, telecommunication, consumer electronics and advanced automotive electronics AustinConventionCentercompanies.

To learn more about DAC, go to:  www.dac.com

To register for DAC, go to:  https://dac.com/content/registration

 

Can We Trust the Internet of Things to Protect Us?

By Valerie C.
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Trust Internet of Things

Within the next decade the internet could connect as many as 200 billion things—and not just machines such as cars or household appliances, but anything that you can fit a chip or sensor into—including humans. These devices, collectively known as the Internet of Things, should make life simpler, even healthier, but can we trust them to look after us?

It’s 6 am on Monday 1 October 2025. The device on your wrist has sensed that you’re waking up so it sends a message to your coffee machine to start brewing. You delay the coffee and go for a run instead. While you’re pounding the pavement, the sensors in your earphones detect an irregular heartbeat. The device sends an ECG readout to a cardiologist. He sees that the arrhythmias are just harmless ectopic beats and decides to take no further action.

Back home, you have your well-earned coffee and put the empty cup in the dishwasher. The dishwasher is full, so it starts running. A sensor detects that the appliance is due for a service. It makes the appointment with an engineer and books a date in your diary, which you later confirm. A couple of decades ago, dishwashers were one of the biggest causes of house-fires, but not anymore. The internet of things (IoT)—devices connected to each other over the internet—has made the world infinitely safer. From self-driving cars to smart pills that measure our health from the inside, the internet in 2025 has become a custodian of our health and safety. But have we been wise to give the reigns of responsibility—that we once took hold of ourselves for things like driving or administering medicine—to a device?

Read the Full article to get the answer!

If you want to go further on the topic of the IoT, you can read “What’s next in the Internet of Things?.



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