Designing for the Medical Device Industry: The Future – Connected Health

By Helene
Initially posted by CORE77

With the explosion of wearable technology and legislation like the Affordable Care Act, the medical product industry is rapidly evolving. Healthcare is seeing unprecedented changes, creating new opportunities for devices that connect consumers and doctors to information faster, easier, and more efficiently.

“It’s coming to a point where there are just amazing breakthroughs every day,” says Tor Alden, Principal and CEO at HS Design (HSD), where he has been directly involved in medical design for over 14 years. “[Technologists] are innovating and changing the landscape of how healthcare is going to be done to the point where we’re not going to recognize it in the next three or four years from where it is now.” It’s a changing landscape that has caught the eye of many innovative startups, who now make up half of HSD’s client list.

These new products have amazing technology, but it needs to be humanized and centered on user needs to be successful.”

HSD is positioning itself to be a bridge connecting the medical and healthcare startups with the investment banker communities. Alden predicts that if the growth continues at this rate, that number could be closer to 80% in the next few years.

The AliveCor heart monitor. Designed by Karten Design.

One of the factors opening the door for innovation in the medical device industry is the Affordable Care Act. As requirements roll out for health care providers, there is an increasing need for new tools and products that ensure patient compliance. Take a typical hip replacement, for example: Under the Affordable Care Act, if a doctor or hospital is not tracking the compliance and rehabilitation of that patient and they return within a year with no improvement, the hospital owes money to the government. There’s a financial incentive to make sure patients get better and, therefore, to track and evaluate their progress. This could spur invention around hip replacements—possibly leading to one with a chip (i.e., embedded UDI) to track rehabilitation or remind patients to get complete their physical therapy exercises.

“The Affordable Care Act is a great opportunity for the design community right now. Everybody is trying to figure out how to innovate increase patient compliance and allow caregivers tools to manage the healthcare services,” says Alden. “Between that and the iHealth generation of iPhones, smartphones, iPads, and everybody wanting to have more control over their healthcare knowledge, there’s a huge opportunity for new products.”

In the century of the wearable device, nearly everyone has some type of personal fitness tracker. For the medical device industry, this means a rise in connected health as consumers clamor to track everything from their steps to calories to sleep cycles. With that surge in technology comes an accelerated need for the design and development of interfaces between the technology and the consumer. “This is the most interesting space that a designer could work today. It’s fascinating,” shares Aidan Petrie, Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Ximedica, a medical product development company headquartered in Rhode Island. “We work between humans and the products they use and make sure that they are more usable, satisfactory and safer.”

Ideation & Concept Design

Despite the incentive for new and better products, the medical device industry remains a difficult niche to break into, due to FDA regulations, enormous amounts of capital required, the need for a high level of specialization, and timelines that span 2–6 years. All these factors contribute to a high failure rate, causing many of these projects to be cancelled before they even reach the prototype stage.

Dassault Systèmes is trying to lower that rate of failure by creating software applications that help these companies better understand and anticipate these challenges from the beginning of a project. The software company released an all-in-one program called Ideation & Concept Design for Medical Device industry solution experience, a cloud-based platform designed specifically to take a team through the entire product development process. From initial ideation and market research to verification and validation, the system tracks deliverables and traceable requirements demanded of the strict FDA and other regulations around this sector. With Ideation & Concept Design for Medical Device, Dassault Systèmes shortens the amount of time it takes to bring a product to market, which is critical in a quickly expanding market where there is no time to waste.

The medical device industry will explode for the next twenty years. It will be the place to be focused as a designer,” says Petrie. “It’s great doing things that change people’s lives, and a product can still look beautiful at the same time.”


Check out Beyond the design of the Medical Device to dig deeper into this topic and access the “Ideation & Concept Design for Medical Device” information kit here, over on Dassault Systèmes’ site:  Ideation & concept design for medical device.

Think you have what it takes to shape the future?

By Alyssa

If you have been following this blog for the past 6 years, or if you’ve just found us – you will know that we at Dassault Systemes are driven by a goal to help people imagine sustainable innovations capable of harmonizing product (the economy), nature (the environment) and life (the people). We believe that “if we ask the right questions, we can change the world.”  We are passionate about helping leaders in a range of industries around the world create innovative ways to advance and optimize our path to the future.

To support our mission, we are excited to announce that we have formed a new community on LinkedIn called Future Realities.  You won’t hear a lot directly from us there. Instead, we created this as a space for anyone interested in kicking around ideas around future trends and technology to come together.  You’ll find posts now from thought leaders from The Economist and the Wall Street Journal, and every day community members are raising their own questions to learn what others out there think.

We would love for you to join us! Share your own questions, or jump into one of the compelling discussion topics already raising interesting points, such as:

Join the Future Realities Discussion

Challenges and Opportunities of Feeding an Expanding, Aging Population

By Catherine

Written by Catherine Bolgar

Food has its fashions, with form and function battling for dominance. Convenience, low-calorie, locavores, organic, functional food, indulgent excesses…what’s next?

Personalized nutrition, nutrition density, immediacy and alternative proteins are some of the key words for the future.

Personalized nutrition

Salad

We’re going to see even more diversity of choices, as well as products aimed at specific population groups, says Gerhard Rechkemmer, president of the Max Rubner Institut, a food and nutrition research organization in Karlsruhe, Germany.

In the future, that will go into what we call personalized nutrition,” he says. “You will have the genetic or metabolic design of a person and provide food for their needs.”

The microbiome—the bacteria in the gut—is even more genetically diverse than the genes in our own bodies. These bacteria “have a metabolism as we do, but it’s something we don’t much understand yet,” says Peter Weber, a medical doctor and nutritionist in Kaiseraugst, Switzerland. “In the future, we will understand better how the different systems in the body interact.”

While the outlines of a prudent diet are known, new research results in adjustments to details like recommended daily requirements for various nutrients. That’s likely to go further, with adjustments based on individuals’ genetic makeup.

Nutrition density

Two rapid changes are affecting our relationship with food that will make nutrition density a key trend in the future. First, our lifestyle has become much more sedentary, even within the past few decades. Second, we are living much longer.

In both cases, we are eating more calories than we need. The result is the explosion in obesity—a 28% increase in adults and 47% increase in children in the past 33 years, with the number of overweight and obese people hitting 2.1 billion in 2013, according to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013, published in The Lancet.

Yet even though we’re eating too much, we aren’t getting the nutrition we need. “When we talk about nutritional challenges, we typically start off with developing countries because that’s so obvious,” Dr. Weber says. “But in affluent societies we also have micronutrient inadequacies.”

On a global level, about 37% of people have insufficient vitamin D serum levels and only 12% are within the desired range, Dr. Weber says, adding that about 90% of Americans aren’t getting enough vitamin E. The World Health Organization estimates 250 million preschool children lack enough vitamin A, which puts them at risk of blindness.

As people age, their bodies absorb less of the micronutrients in food. The challenge in the future is “how we can make appropriate food which is micronutrient dense, with not too much energy and which tastes good,” Dr. Weber says.

Immediacy

Snacking in the U.S. represents half of all “eating occasions.” While people say they are looking for something healthy for more than half of those snacks, “planning is hard. People are time-stressed. Their lives are hectic,” says Laurie Demeritt, chief executive of The Hartman Group, a food research and consulting firm in Bellevue, Washington.

People prefer to make decisions about food close to the eating occasion, to choose based on their mood at the moment. “They don’t like to plan. They eat on a whim. It changes how we view food,” she says.

As a result, retail formats are adapting to serve people who want to buy something to eat at the last minute, by serving freshly prepared offerings. Food-service operators also are making it possible for people to call in an order that they can run in to pick up. It’s a trend that’s likely to grow.

Twenty or 30 years ago, there were certain places where you could buy food,” Ms. Demeritt says. “Now there are more options for food procurement, and not so much pressure for planning.”

Even though 60% of millennials say they enjoy cooking, they aren’t talking about cooking from scratch, she says. “They want to get a sauce that’s prepared, but they’ll choose the vegetables, for example. They’re looking for the manufacturer to be the sous-chef and still let them have choice and creativity.”

Alternative proteins

As the world population climbs toward an expected peak of nine billion, there’s a question of how people will get enough to eat, especially as people who enter the middle class in developing countries tend to adopt the same kind of meat-heavy, processed diets common to affluent societies.

When the Chinese began to drink more milk, it had an impact on the global milk supply,” Dr. Weber says. “If we have three billion more people to feed in the future, from where should we provide protein? From even better farming? From plants? From artificial proteins that you grow in a lab? These are opportunities and challenges.”

Protein ties into the aging of society as well, because older people need to consume more protein to deal with muscle wasting.

senior woman cutting vegetables on chopping board in kitchen

However, in Europe and the U.S., vegetarian and vegan diets are becoming more popular, says Dr. Rechkemmer of the Max Rubner Institut. India shows that “a vegetarian diet supplies sufficient protein if you have products available. It remains to be seen whether that trend will continue.”

However, in Europe and the U.S., vegetarian and vegan diets are becoming more popular, says Dr. Rechkemmer of the Max Rubner Institut. India shows that “a vegetarian diet supplies sufficient protein if you have products available. It remains to be seen whether that trend will continue.”

For more from Catherine, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join The Future Realities discussion.



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