How new technologies can help assess impact of wind energy projects on the local population

By Karun

The Wind Energy industry is at an inflection point. There is a tremendous opportunity for renewable energy in general, and specifically Wind energy, as can be envisaged by the ambitious plans for countries like Germany, UK, China, India and several others.

The key to a Wind farm project success is to start on the right foot, by identifying the right site. Many companies identify the site based on technical factors (such as wind speed data, grid connectivity), economic factors (ROI, tax credits, feed-in tariff) and political factors (local regulations and political support) and even environment factors (e.g. bird migration paths) are assessed and validated during the siting phase. However, what is often underestimated or even overlooked is the social dimensionassessing the impact of the projects on the local population, who are both citizens impacted by the project and also potentially consumers of the power produced. These factors can add considerable risk to the project and needs to be included as part of the project development process in order to avoid expensive delays that can fundamentally affect the economics of the project.  There can be significant opposition to Wind energy among the communities where Wind farms will be located. Among the main concerns are noise, effects of health, visual impact and adverse effects to wildlife.

One of the innovative ways to achieve this is to use advanced analytics to capture and analyze the sentiments of the local population. Such innovative techniques are commonly used by consumer driven companies (like Consumer Good and Consumer Product Good industries) as a way to capture the voice of customer very early in the project. The analytics can assess the sentiments of the local population by analyzing what is being said from various sources – like media authored or followed by local media and local influences (such as blogs). Such analysis can identify regions where there could potentially be opposition to wind energy and also identify risks for the project stakeholders.

Several stakeholders from project developers, financers, owners / operators have considerable stake tied up in the projects and can least afford any expensive delays during the construction phase due to opposition from local population. Ideally, such issues should be identified and accounted in the site selection during project development.

To learn more, go to http://www.3ds.com/industries/energy-process-utilities/wind-power/

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Karun CHAKRAVARTHY is a member of the Energy, Process & Utilities Industry team

 

Stay in control of your Wind Energy project

By Anne

Managing the Wind turbine Product development is a complex process, given the diverse engineering, testing and manufacturing disciplines and the globalization of these departments.

The program duration of a new Wind turbine design is typically five years. How do companies continue to develop innovative products and bring them to market quicker?

Traditionally, each department implemented its own system to maintain the project data, which resulted in data duplication, lack of traceability and no standardization of processes leading to significant project delays and cost overruns.

Managing the project development process on a single collaborative platform across departments enables concurrent engineering between design, testing and manufacturing. You can reduce the time needed to validate the design, enable early start of production, and reduce time to market. By providing design with early feedback, issues can be detected much earlier in the development process, thereby eliminating costly manufacturing problems and delays.

Watch the video and see our software in action!  :-)

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Anne Busson is a member of the Energy, Process & Utilities team.

 

Blue Sky Solar Car Follows the Sun Across Australia

By Suzanne

A fleet of cars are racing 3,021 kilometers (1,877 miles) across Australia this week powered by nothing except solar energy. Among them is a car from Blue Sky Solar which was designed using Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE Platform.

Thirty-eight teams from 22 countries competing in the World Solar Challenge departed Darwin on Sunday the 6th and are expected to arrive in Adelaide Sunday the 13th. Vehicles must be highly efficient to both make the long trek and to make it in the fastest time.

Traditionally building vehicles for the race can be a year’s long process. But the Blue Sky Solar Car team was able to build a vehicle in just 13 months. Paul Park, Managing Director of the University of Toronto Blue Sky Solar Car team, said:

This was the first generation car on which we used the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform. Not only did it help us collaborate better and improve work flow tremendously, it was critical to us being able to design and deliver the vehicle so quickly.

CATIA allowed us to fully integrate the systems in the vehicle and gave us the flexibility to design a world-class aero body while SIMULIA highlighted potential problems early in the design process and helped us avoid over-design.

3DEXPERIENCE design and realistic simulation apps allowed the Blue Sky Solar Car team to work on all their car’s systems under one interface – including mechanical, electrical and aerobody – from the first concept all the way through to manufacturing. The team deployed DELMIA’s Human Builder and virtual manikin applications in order to visualize ergonomics and driver comfort, and even identify and remedy flawed calculations in the design phase. SIMULIA’s advanced simulation technology aided in further validating the design intent – an analysis that had previously been done using only rudimentary hand calculations.

After three days the Blue Sky Solar Car team is in 9th place. You can track the vehicle here.

Watch “See You at the Finish Line”:

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