I love my Austin Mini and Wacky Races!

By Jonathan

I’m a big fan of classic cars and motorbikes, I’ve got three altogether. My 1987 Austin Mini is my daily runner and I love it. It’s a bit sick at the moment, so I’ve got to look after it! Luckily for sick Minis there are lots of parts available on numerous websites and always so many friendly people to give you advice.

But don’t worry, I do hire big “modern” cars for holidays; my family appreciates the comfort, luggage capacity and above all the safety…and of course, the geek in me likes the gadgets! But there’s something I do in modern cars that I never do in my old “bangers”… I nearly fall asleep at the wheel!

I’m not saying that modern cars should break down and make squeaky noises like old cars, but what about the emotional experience?

Take, for example, the cool commercial for the Peugeot 208. It’s the Wacky Races!

He even gets Penelope at the end, I can’t believe it!

I loved the Wacky Races as a child (and secretly still do), and knew that Transportation & Mobility was where I wanted to work when I grew up. Peugeot’s commercial is so well done, but it got me thinking, which car would I rather be in? The 208 or one of the Wacky racing cars, well I know for sure which would be more fun!

And that’s just it; modern cars are just not fun anymore (except of course expensive thoroughbred sports cars). Modern cars are much safer, they’re quieter, have better music systems, they are an engineering miracle! But, I feel we’ve lost the pleasure of being mobile. I have more fun being mobile when jogging than driving a modern car down a country lane at 100kph!

Peugeot’s purpose “Motion & Emotion” really speaks to me, it really is that. Jump up and down with joy or sit like a sac when you’re sad. We cannot disconnect our emotions with our motions.

What do you think should happen? Should future mobility be more emotional no matter if we take the train, a car, a bicycle or a tram?

In the mean time I’ll still be keeping my 1987 Austin Mini :wink:

Mobilely yours,
Jonathan

3D Merry Melody

By Richard

Today Mehdi, Marc and I  were discussing the evolution of interactive communication and how 3DVIA Virtools had changed the way we’re communicating and “3D-evangelizing”.

Reviewing some old presentations, we began reminiscing about the day when we our website www.3ds.com was  awarded the Macromedia “Site of the day” with this Flash animation. We remembered how we dared to have another Richard (he’s the actor in the movie) breaking a cell phone (fast-forward to 3:50 to zoom to the phone part) with a hammer during the presentation, because we wanted to have a different tone in the way we were introducing our products. It’s not because they are stuffy, serious products that you can’t speak about with a tongue-in-cheek approach.

I remember someone began to sing something about 3D. And then it began … everyone got delirious about it. Happily enough, a computer artist, a good friend of ours, knew a very good musician in NYC, Shon ‘Chance’ Miller. Shon was using an interesting approach of graphics, 3D and music as an integrated media (you may want to check out his work on his site, Brainmixer). We contacted him with our first musical attempt, which left him rolling on the floor laughing.

It took Shon only a few moments to come with the following 3D rap, that instantly became an internal hit. I’d like to share it with you today. Just click play on the music widget and be sure to turn up your sound. Have fun! Do not hesitate to rap on it!

[audio:http://perspectives.3ds.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/3ds_shon-chance-miller.mp3]

Today, we dropped Flash in favor of 3DVIA Virtools of course. We added the third dimension to our communications. We already told you about Khufu. What about a little rollercoaster ride to start your week-end?

Keep 3D-ing!

Regards,

Rich

Xplorair: A New Mobility Concept

By Richard

 

Xplorair PX200

Here is one of our current Passion for Innovation projects: Xplorair.

When I was approached about it, I immediately thought, “Wow! Here is The Fifth Element taxi!” That being said, it quickly became obvious that Xplorair was a solid project, lead by an experienced aero engineer named Michel Aguilar.

The candidate projects we favor most in Passion for Innovation must bring something new and exciting to the world. There was no doubt about the excitement Xplorair generated when I read the proposal. And as for innovation, well, I’ll let you decide for yourself:

The Xplorair is a vertical take-off and landing without rotative wing vehicle based on the Coanda effect.

What is the Coanda effect? To put it briefly, it’s the ability of a fluid flow (liquid or gas) to “stick” to a convex surface and to attract it. It has been studied by the engineer Henri Coanda, therefore its name. A simple demonstration of this effect can be done by holding a sheet of paper by one of its ends, with one hand on each corner of that end. Blow on the piece of paper while aiming your breath between your hands, and you will see the free end of the paper rise up.

Congratulations! You have shown that upper surface blowing creates a bearing strength. This is what Xplorair is based on. If you blow on a wing’s upper surface, you will take off. If the wing is in fact made of two articulated parts with the jet engine blowing somewhere in the middle, it’s enough to change the angle between the two wing parts to make the transition between vertical take-off, and regular, horizontal flight.

The Coanda effect has already been used on some aircrafts to bring additional bearing strength and reduce take-off distances. However, Xplorair is definitely a breakthrough as it is the FIRST aircraft entirely relying on this effect for BOTH take-off and flight.

To spice up the project, Xplorair will treat the subject of greener mobility. The engine– a brand new kind of engine called a thermoreactor– is a second technical breakthrough in its own right. It will use second generation biofuels (i.e. non threatening for food nor biodiversity), and some cabin elements, such as the control panel and seats, will be made out of agro-materials.

Xplorair will come in several versions (1, 2 or 4 seats). For starters we’re working to develop the monoseat version, the PX200 (for Personal Xplorair, 200 km/h).

The Xplorair team is using CATIA V5 as the 3D CAD software for design, SIMULIA and CAA-partner CD-Adapco solutions to simulate the vehicle in operation.

So, is Xplorair an airplane? a flying car? a flying motorbike? No matter what you call it, it’s a new mobility concept.

And who could give this concept a shape if not DS Design Studio? I’m happy to announce that we just started the ideation phase with Anne Asensio’s enthusiastic and creative team. They were already sketching during the meeting. ;-)

Stay tuned for more info about Xplorair in future 3D Perspectives blog posts.

Keep 3D-ing!

Regards,

Rich

P.S. Unfortunately, neither Bruce Willis nor Milla Jovovich will be delivered with the final product, just in case you’re wondering . . .



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Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.