Intelligent Rainscreen Façade Video

By Akio
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Originally published on the Desktop Engineering blog. Written by Geoff Haines.

At Desktop Engineering, we aim to help our customers find ways of doing design or manufacturing quicker and of higher quality using software technologies.

Geoffrey M. Haines, Desktop Engineering

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

One of the approaches we can use is to use a rule based approach to capture knowledge to allow it to be re-used.

Rules are those simple set of instructions, something as simple as a cooking recipe, that one follows that determines an outcome. So it is with engineering. Capture those rules and then reuse them in software and then you have design automation.

We have done this with the design of Rainscreen Façades using the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

By taking the elements of a façade rainscreen, encapsulating the design process as a set of rules, we have created an Intelligent Rainscreen Façade solution.

We can vary any parameter within the rules to automatically recreate a complete assembly.

As every part in the assembly has an associated fabrication drawing, then those are automatically recreated too. Preset reports then create a full schedule of parts, cutting lists and cost information.

So when your architect decides on a different variation in grid or material, it’s simple to recreate a design, determine a cost, and create full fabrication details.

We have a short video demonstration to highlight this process:

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: Intelligent Rainscreen Façade Video @Desktop_Eng @3DSAEC #AEC #3DEXPERIENCE

Related Resources

Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Process Experience

WHITEPAPER Technological Changes Brought by BIM to Façade Design

Intelligent 3D Façade Templated Design

By Akio
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Geoffrey M. Haines, Desktop Engineering

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

By Geoff Haines

If you think back to your first days in a design office, in a new industry, fresh from college, you’ll remember that there was always a designer who’d been there many years. That was the person you sought for help, as they had all the experience of what works and what doesn’t.

It was Oscar Wilde who said, “Experience is simply the name we give to our mistakes.” Why shouldn’t you capture that experience to then avoid making the same mistakes?

There is a way this can be achieved which is by using a templated approach to design or, to use another term, “Knowledge Based Engineering”.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: Knowledge Based Engineering
= taking a templated approach to design

Knowledge Based Engineering sounds like a complicated process but our simple application and approach allows an organisation to capture best practises and methodologies which become an automatic benefit for all concerned.

It is a way to create fully detailed designs and manufacturing information automatically.

Further, designers can then optimise, or “optioneer”, many different ideas or solutions quickly to enhance the design process.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: With templates, #AEC designers can
“optioneer” many different solutions quickly

3d_facade At Desktop Engineering we have taken this idea and developed what we term an Intelligent Rainscreen Panel for façade designers and fabricators.

Using Dassault’s 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, we have captured the rules and formulae that drive the shape, strength, weight, and cost of a panel.

Factors such as blank sheet utilisation, different materials and thicknesses, and knowledge of manufacturing costs (laser cutting, folding) are all accounted for in the rules.

Further, the secondary structure or rails, that hold the panels have also been created as intelligent parts with similar information.

Combine these intelligent templates with an automated process for replicating them on a 3D building model and, within minutes, users are able to create a full design with manufacturing drawings, material schedules, and costs.

Alternate designs can be recreated by simply varying one or several parameters and then seeing the resultant recalculated cost and design.

Of course there is no single set of knowledge or experiences, as then there would be no differentiation between competing façade fabricators.

However, with the basis of one set of Knowledge within our Intelligent Rainscreen Panel, we are able to customise this set to suit particular fabricators.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: Intelligent #3D Façade Templated
Design | @Desktop_Eng @3DSAEC


Originally published on the Desktop Engineering Blog


bim-whitepaperRelated Resources

END-TO-END COLLABORATION ENABLED BY BIM LEVEL 3: An Industry Approach Based on Best Practices from Manufacturing

Facade Design for Fabrication Industry Process Experience

Desktop Engineering

To BIM or not to BIM?

By Akio
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The following article was originally published by Geoff Haines on the Desktop Engineering Blog and is reprinted with permission. 

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: To BIM or not to BIM?
@3DSAEC @Desktop_Eng


Geoffrey M. Haines, Desktop Engineering

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

I can’t claim originality to this Shakespearean title which has suitable gravity for many companies in the construction industry. It was thought up by Dr Steve Lo of Bath University for a one-day conference I attended organised by the “Future Envelope” community of façade designers and manufacturers.

Drawing from members of the European Façade Networks, the Society of Façade Engineers and Centre for Window Cladding technology, the aim of the conference was to discuss how BIM can help or even hinder the design and construction process of building facades.

To start off, early presentations included how professionals and companies can gain accreditation to be BIM Level 2 compliant. This is a requirement for any building design and construction contract delivered to the UK government since April 2016. Hence it’s a hot topic and the explanations given by BRE (Building Research Establishment) on their BIM Level 2 certification process were received well.

Certainly I see great opportunity for individual consultants to template the people, process and technology needs of BIM certification so smaller firms can overlay this on their business at minimum cost.

Other presentations discussed how both architects and engineers worked with different technologies to achieve the aim of clear communication of design intent.

Abdulmajid Karanouh of Ramboll gave a really thoughtful presentation discussing what architects really need to do to communicate to their supply chain.

What I really found interesting was the discussion on The Al-Bahr Towers, designed by Aedas of which Abdulmajid was part of the team. Aedas created a design specification that wasn’t a model, but a set of geometrical formulae and process that would create the design.

This is the ultimate “CAD’nostic” design.

Any CAD package that could be driven by some sort of scripting or formula could create this geometry – giving the geometrical definition of a 1000-person tower.

I found this approach quite revolutionary, taking the architect’s idea into a form that could be expressed mathematically – something my engineer’s brain could comprehend.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: .@Aedas created not a model, but a set of formulas and processes to produce a design | #architecture #BIM @DesktopEng

Ultimately, when the selected suppliers all delivered their design information, this was all consolidated into the Dassault Systemes CATIA based technology to deliver a BIM model. This approach caused some real heated interchange about an architect’s definition of form.

Overall, the conclusion to the day was mixed – the smaller firms seeing it as an overhead, the larger firms seeing it as a necessity – but one thought overriding all this discussion was ‘who pays for it?’

In automotive and aerospace, we all know that that more upfront design activity delivers lower costs downstream.

In construction, these two activities are delivered by different bodies, with different earnings streams – extra costs in design delivers savings for contractors.

So I’ll leave you with this – how do we square this circle?

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: To BIM or not to BIM?
@3DSAEC @Desktop_Eng


by Geoff Haines


Related Resources

Desktop Engineering, UK

Facade Design for Fabrication

WHITEPAPER: Technological Changes Brought by BIM to Façade Design

VIDEO: Facade Design for Fabrication Demo