ENOVIA at DESIGN in the Age of EXPERIENCE

By Matthew
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DitaoEComing this April 11-12 in Milan, Italy – join colleagues and like-minded design-focused professionals from around the world as they converge on what will be a blow-out global conference.  For two days, come and be inspired by solutions delivering disruptive 3D experiences for designers around the world. Let’s imagine together the future of Design and Engineering, connecting the dots from FICTION to FUNCTION, and innovating across roles on Dassault Systèmes.

ENOVIA will be at this event and we invite you to join our breakout sessions planned that we hope you attend.

April 11
Day 1:

  • Brand CEO Breakout Session

April 12
Day 2:

  • Accelerating Market-Driven Product Development with Garth Coleman VP of ENOVIA Brand Marketing (9:30am)
    Learn how to get the best ideas from the market and enable requirements-driven
  • Keeping complex projects on time with Invisible Governance with of ENOVIA Brand Marketing Howie Markson (10:15am)
    Learn how to provide global teams with accurate, realtime information to keep design deliverables on track and respond to ever-shrinking product lifecycles
  • Harness the power of 3DEXPERIENCE and CATIA V5 with Howie Markson (11:30am)
    Learn what exciting and unique 3DEXPERIENCE® applications can be leveraged by CATIA V5 data to enhance your design capabilities and improve your productivity
  • Disruptive Engineering using Data Driven Design with Sameer Arora of ENOVIA User Experience (1:45pm & 2:30pm)
    Learn how to quickly capitalize on multiple market opportunities to capture market share and significantly improve design productivity

1_ENOVIA 3DConfigurator

  • Move to 3DEXPERIENCE with Sameer Arora (4:00pm)
    Transition & Coexistence approaches for CATIA V5 users moving to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform

2_CV5Transition-CV63DXPlatform

The day will have the other Dassault Systèmes brands on site with engaging and exciting content.  Additionally, plan to check out the 3DEXPERIENCE Playground where you will be able to enter virtual universes where you will discover how the 3DEXPERIENCE platform helps companies innovate in the age of experience and shape the future.

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We look forward to you joining everyone at this event.

HERE’s a LINK to the detailed agenda and all the relevant info for the two days can be found on the landing page HERE.

See you in Milan!

Additive manufacturers lead a design revolution

By Catherine
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Written by Catherine Bolgar
3D printer

Additive manufacturing—industrial-strength 3D printing—is shaking up the world of industrial design.

The global market for additive manufacturing (AM) grew 35% in 2014, as companies increasingly find new ways to use the process. AM builds up objects layer by layer, as opposed to conventional, or subtractive, manufacturing methods, which cut or grind down a solid piece to the desired form.

As a result, AM is capable of producing new shapes that would have been difficult to create using conventional methods. It can also fashion new internal architecture that’s hollow or contains lattices, instead of being solid. This not only reduces the amount of material used, it also makes the end product lighter. And it allows us to rethink design.

Additive technology has opened up the door for us to conceive shapes and designs,” says Joshua Mook, engineering manager, additive technologies, at General Electric Aviation in Cincinnati. “Shapes are now free, complexity is free, so we can go satisfy the physics and the shapes in the way they want to be satisfied.”

Cooling devices, such as car radiators or laser cooling systems, can now be designed with interior channels that aren’t possible when using conventional manufacturing tools.

3D printer concept“Designers can take technologies that were mature before and now can add functionality,” says Matt Wraith, group leader, defense technologies engineering division, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. “A good designer is going to think about the manufacturing process when designing a part, but you have [far] fewer restrictions with additive. It’s a challenge for some technical staff, because they have to forget all the things they learned in the past.

The new mindset is leading designers to seek inspiration from nature rather than manmade structures.

“Historically we have handled problems like high loads by transferring some of the load to another member or out into the airplane,” Mr. Mook says. “All our solutions used to look like textbook solutions, with beams, right angles, things that are easy to cut.

In the future, ”they’re going to look more like bones in the human body,” he adds. “They’re not going to have constant cross-sections or predictable or recognizable shapes. They’re going to look much more freeform.”

AM is particularly suited to evolutionary structural optimization, a design idea from the 1990s based on removing non-load-bearing materials, allowing structures to be hollowed out as much as possible.

These new geometries can affect a material’s properties.

Engineer working on a 3D printer“In many cases, you go from molten to solid very quickly. That has negatives and positives. If you truly understand it you can use that to your advantage and generate materials that are stronger than in the past, like in a cast that solidifies very slowly. If you don’t understand it, it can lead to cracking and weakness,” Mr. Mook says. “Just as forging and casting are different, we treat AM materials differently from materials from other processes. We do extensive testing.”

Internal passageways also can alter a part’s performance. GE Aviation used AM to make a jet-engine fuel nozzle, which has many passageways for air, fuel and thermal isolation. “Fuel comes in ice-cold from the wing tanks,” Mr. Mook explains. “Inside the jet, it’s extremely hot. When you have extreme cold and extreme heat next to each other, it produces thermal stress. That has limited designs for a long time. Now, we can do a better job of getting fuel where we want it and air where we want it, and the parts can have longer lives.”

AM also offers the unique ability to change the density of a material within a single piece, though the technique is still at the research stage.

On a simpler level, AM is democratizing design. “You can reverse-engineer an item,” says Mr. Wraith of Livermore Lab.

If you have an existing part, you can just scan it. There’s no need to design it.”

Online databases contain open-source designs, while other designs can easily be bought.

“That’s the future,” Mr. Wraith says. “You download the design for a part and print it and you’re good to go.”

 

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe. For more from Catherine Bolgar, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion on LinkedIn.

Photos courtesy of iStock

The Inside Track for Transport Designers

By Catherine
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Written by Catherine Bolgar

 

Global car ownership passed the one billion mark in 2010, with more than one vehicle per person in the U.S. and much of Europe. Yet despite the fact that Europeans and Americans waste an annual average of 111 hours in traffic jams, public transportation ridership rose only 8% in the European Union and 15% in the U.S. and Canada between 2000 and 2012

Why don’t we design an experience that would beat cars?” asks Bruce Mau, co-founder of Massive Change Network, a Chicago design studio. “Let’s make something that’s exciting for people and makes them want to use it.”

Underground metro systems have installed art, Wi-Fi and heated seats; bus services are now trying similar approaches. Some Paris bus stops, for example, now boast Wi-Fi and charging stations, coffee, bus ticket sales and neighborhood information.

But buses are fighting against the so-called track effect. “People seem to consider vehicles running on tracks as more solid, almost no matter what you do to improve bus services,” says Andreas Røhl, an urban-transport specialist at Gehl Architects in Copenhagen.

If you put in tracks, people will know or feel that this will stay here, it’s a permanent thing,” he adds. “If you’re a developer, then you’re sure this new mode of public transport will stay here.”

Planners can, however, overcome such concerns. Curitiba, in southern Brazil, for example, applied designs used in metros to buses in the 1970s, to create bus rapid transit (BRT). The city’s long, articulated buses run along an exclusive road corridor. They have extra doors to speed access. Tube-shaped bus stations are raised so passengers don’t need to climb steps to board, and fares are paid on entering the station, rather than the bus, further saving time.

“They got the carrying capacity of a subway at about one-hundredth of the cost,” Mr. Mau says.

About 70% of Curitiba commuters take buses, which carry as many as 11,000 passengers per hour during peak times. And that pales compared with Bogotá, Colombia, which tops the BRT ridership ranks with 45,000 passengers per hour. BRT has now been adopted by more than 150 cities world-wide.

This level of efficiency is possible thanks in part to better vehicle interior design, which varies according to local need, says Andrew Nash, director of Vienna-based GreenCityStreets.com. For example, urban vehicles should be open, with few seats, so people can get on and off quickly, while on suburban routes, riders sit for longer requiring more comfortable seats, he says.

Although comfort and convenience are important, designers cannot just focus on amenities. Mr. Nash recalls a San Francisco company whose buses were fitted with Wi-Fi and USB ports, which went bankrupt after just two months.

Instead, design needs to optimize processes such as more efficient fare-collection machines, and information technology that provides precise arrival information, he says. Applications such as Ridescout lay out a range of travel options, such as walking, biking, driving and public transportation, and calculate the time, money and calories involved.

“Life in the city is increasingly about using different choices at different times,” says Jarrett Walker, president of Jarrett Walker & Associates, a public-transit consultancy in Portland, Ore., and author of the book Human Transit. “It gets us away from imagining that transport options are like teams we belong to: bus riders or bikers or drivers.”

It’s important therefore that we “don’t assume that some sort of design choice—a nicer bus, Wi-Fi, nicer shelters—solves public transport’s problem,” Mr. Walker says. “The problem may be that the service is just useless, that it doesn’t run where needed or at times it’s needed. Network planning has to make sure it’s useful for people.”

“Useful” generally means “frequent,” he adds. “The biggest problem is waiting. We have to design the network around frequency.”

To have frequent and full buses, public transportation needs high-density urban areas, where parking is expensive and inconvenient, and where access to public transit is just a short walk away.

Urban planners can increase density along mass-transit corridors, as has happened, for example, in Toronto as well as Curitiba. “There are ways you can control development around the transit,” to put riders near lines, Mr. Mau says. “That kind of density management is what transit people should be designing.”

In this way, we can challenge the widespread assumption that car travel is always fastest, followed by metro trains or light rail, with buses the slowest. Bus rapid transit in city centers averages 16 to 18 kilometers per hour (kph), which is faster than the 12 kph average of cars in Beijing, though slower than the 25 kph in New York and Singapore. Buses can travel as quickly and reliably as subways if given dedicated corridors, Mr. Walker says.

In fact, it is cars that tend to slow mass transit, by double-parking, blocking tram tracks or just generally creating traffic jams.

It’s not fair that one person in a car has the same right to road space as 50 people in a bus,” Mr. Nash says. “But it’s politically difficult to say we’re giving priority to buses because there are more people on them.”

 

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe. For more from Catherine Bolgar, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion on LinkedIn.

Photos courtesy of iStock



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