Why EXPERIENCE Thinking? (And not just Design Thinking)

By Alyssa
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By Valerie Pegon, Experience designer & Innovation Strategist, Dassault Systèmes

Designers hate to stand still. They permanently reflect back on their practice, redesigning and testing, in order to improve it.  Every time, when something seems sorted, another challenge emerges.  Little by little, the practice gets more professional, and more specialized.  But occasionally, there is a need for regrouping, for reconnecting.  It is with this intention that we reflected back on design thinking and saw opportunities to make it more powerful.

Unfortunately, design thinking is often reduced to a recipe, to define user journeys that are relevant to today’s user needs.  But what about tasting the dish to check how it is coming along? What about gathering the right ingredients (the diversity of people, a broader knowledge, unusual ingredients)?  What about the restaurant itself and the suppliers (the organisation, the partners and the business models)? And tomorrow?

We believe Experience Thinking can take companies to another level; helping businesses in their transformation. There are indeed a few top-level challenges and opportunities it can help with.

First, agility. While it may sound obvious for digital companies, agility remains complex for other industries. However, the evolutions of technologies and science unlock new possibilities that designers can start to harness. Imagine, as a designer, being able to simulate your design right away, in real time. Or being able to test virtual experiences quickly, as if you were there, without having to develop a full serious game?

Second, the Internet of Things. Remember Gartner’s hype curve: the hype may be over today but now, the possibilities are here for you to grasp. Sensing and data analytics enable a continuous feedback loop to improve new designs, to adapt in real time. Connected objects enable services that totally change the way people use products, the business models and even the approach to designing these products and services together, as a whole.

Third, social systems. Like cities, the systems companies create are multi-player and contextually adapting to a wide range of users and stakeholders. Building these ecosystems require some level of structure (we talk about “experience architecture”) to work smoothly, a high level of flexibility and a deep connection to the context and usage.

In the end, we always come back to the experience, because that is where the value lies. But the way we think and enable the experience we dream of is changing.

Discover more about Design in the Age of Experience at our event website

Find out about Dassault Systèmes’ Design Studio here.

 

 

Experience Thinking: The New Shift

By Anne
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By Anne Asensio, Vice President, Design, Dassault Systèmes

In the Age of Experience, customer expectation has been transformed. It’s not just a good idea for a company or a brand to deliver an experience with their product: it is imperative when you want to have a real impact on the market. This is changing the scope of what it means to Design.

Design has evolved beyond modeling products. Products used to be the direct expression of the design intent, defined under the physical constraints of available technologies, materials, ergonomics and well defined tasks and functions. But in the Age of Experience, products are dematerialized, reduced to “black boxes”, while integrating the realm of our augmented life.

The scope and value of Design is now at a critical place.

Design’s perspective is moving from designing products to designing experiences, engaging final users in a totally new way. It goes beyond aesthetics to genuine social means, investing in a larger scope of actions across a large spectrum of new disciplines. This “transdisciplinarity” of Design impacts business models, creates new offerings and new social engagement, and convokes new uses of science for designing meaningful and sustainable experiences.

We traditionally consider “Design Thinking” as placing the “human” at the center of the project or value proposition and deciphering what people really want, but fail to express. Design Thinking was the first visible step of Design transformation, moving from the individual designer’s subjective concept towards an empathic model of engagement, leveraging a social participative approach and multiple viewpoints.

Businesses use Design Thinking to identify market opportunity and build a solution that delivers customer value.  It’s an improvement for designing a better product with clear identity, efficiency, and well-defined utilities. But the world and Design have quickly moved on to broader and more holistic issues, tackling complex systems and considering the full technological and service ecosystem by co-defining with users what makes up a unique and continuous experience.

This broader realm of “Experience Thinking” encompasses a new scope for designers, going beyond functions and harnessing the emotive power of customer experience. They script future scenarios and craft real-time 3D prototypes, use immersive technologies and virtual universes, and develop 3D digital masters with integrated information.  Designers are acquiring abilities to access new information, including knowledge gathered from studies, but also a large variety of Data captured from sensors. These combined social and science-based data provide new material for designer creativity.

Digital content is the new nexus for thoughts, interpretation and decision making. The right tools and platform for ideation, virtualization, manufacturability and sustainability enable designers and businesses to view and validate experiential designs at any stage of the development process. Designers can craft the links between products and their interactions, making visible the emotional connections and their use. Data and senses combine for new balanced proposals.

Where we go from here depends on how we use Design to transform companies’ business ecosystems to create designs that captivate users, accelerate technology adoption and deliver ethical and sustainable experiences. Users will “co-design”, modifying deeply our life experiences and changing forever the way people live, travel and interact with technology in the future.

Design professionals across industries (such as architects, industrial designers and transportation specialists) can today transform their processes, methodologies and applications for experience thinking to imagine, design and fabricate innovative proposals.

Collaborating within this new innovation environment, experience thinking can help a business build its brand’s promise and the accompanying emotions it evokes. Then, each customer experience stands on its own as a singular achievement, but also provides a perfect center of gravity that builds brand loyalty and customer satisfaction.

Discover more about Design in the Age of Experience at our event website.

Find out about Dassault Systèmes’ Design Studio here.

 

 

3 questions to Ayse Birsel

By Remi
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ayse birsel seck dassault systèmes design in life strate college system systemes systeme catia delmia solidworks enovia simulia 3dvia exalead draftsight swym 3dswym CAD CAM PLM 2.0 De/Re deconstruction reconstruction innovation problem solve issueI recently had the opportunity to have a chat with Ayse Brisel, who runs Birsel+Seck design studio. She’s going to be part of a 3DS event soon (Design in Life) so I thought it’d be nice to introduce her and her concepts!

Can you tell me about your design concept: Deconstruction & Reconstruction?

Often Designers are asked about how they think and it’s a challenge to explain the process of design. In the last two years, I tried to articulate my process and Deconstruction & Reconstruction (De/Re) is the result of that.

We are all shaped by our preconceptions. Objects, situations and reality come to us prepackaged as a coherent whole. De/Re is about breaking our preconceptions to free our minds to imagine an array of new hypothesis.

One of my favorite examples of De/Re thinking outside of my work is the Dyson Air Multiplier. It pulls apart the conventional idea of a fan to eliminate its most fundamental part, the blade, and reconstructs a new hypothesis around how to blow air without it. It breaks the status quo to remind you of what you were trying to solve in the first place, which in Dyson’s case was moving air, freeing you to think about new and hopefully better ways of doing it.

I’ve read a lot that you look at your life as a design project… Can you tell me more about that?

When I was articulating De/Re as a process, I thought that it would be interesting to see if this process could be applied to designing one’s life. I like to think of life as our most important project and yet most of us think that we don’t have much control over our lives.

So my point is: ok we can’t control everything, but we can start imagining and designing the kind of life we’d like. So I started a series of workshops called “Design the Life You Love”, to teach people, non-designers as well as designers, to think about life with imagination and originality.

One part of this process is asking people to look at what the Dominant, Subdominant and Subordinate parts of their life are. Another way of saying this is, what is central to your life, what supports that center and what completes it.

Since there are only three parts, it forces people to look at what matters for them in their lives and the hierarchy between them (say, family, friends and work). If you want to have more, you need to resolve dichotomies to figure out how you can get more value within these constraints. Just like a design problem!

Often, people at my workshops are at a point in their life where they want to change something but they don’t know exactly what. So this helps shifting their point of view, and even if they don’t act on it, they learn to think about life differently, creatively, using design tools.

What future do you see for the design industry?

These days, my thinking is that we’re problem solvers, as well as team players. We’re really good at dichotomy resolution, bringing opposing ideas together to create new meaning and value.

So my point is that the design industry will increasingly help people to design their lives and address world problems. There are so many issues (poverty, women rights, democracy, etc.) where our creative thinking can definitely come up with 1+1=3 kinds of solutions, in collaboration with other people and disciplines.

And that’s why I like Deconstruction & Reconstruction; it’s a systematic and learned process around solving problems, but without loosing the whole intuitive and imaginary part of design.

 

Pretty interesting right? I was personally thrilled by De/Re… it’s quite a problem solving method! What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi

P.S.: I’ll be live blogging and tweeting at the event next week so stay tuned! :)



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