Design in Life Pt. 2: Mobility Workshop

By Remi
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dominique cardon stephane vial pierre musso mette thomsen martin tamke dassault systèmes 3DS DS4 system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3dvia exalead swym 3Dswym draftsight 3Dperspectives 3Dperspective 3D CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 PLM2.0 lifelike experience system engineering sustainable development design digital era ayse birsel alain renk frédéric jentgen anne asensio Xplorair

Following my previous post about Design in Life, I’ll share my experience as a participant in  the mobility workshop that took place in the afternoon (along with the other ones: life, city and sustainability).

Dominique Levent and Georges Amar took us on a real journey through the mobility issues:

Georges started by defining mobility as something diametrically opposite to transport. Transport, he says, is  “lost time” while mobility is  “re-found time” in the way that people can do something (or not).

For example, if you take the smart phone, you realize you can get in touch with friends during your daily bus trip to your workplace. This is what Georges meant: “mobility is about going out and meeting people”.

So they went on and talked about the concept of “smart mobility” which is about giving people the ability or the knowledge so that they can manage their time. It can be a schedule, a map, a transport station, some information about your friends geographically close to you, etc.

My favorite example was definitely the Pedibus. It’s a crazy concept which works just like a bus… without the actual bus! There are defined stops and schedules, a specified way and a driver. But you walk! Crazy right? :-)

As long as it serves its users,  every invention is worth it. In the case of the Pedibus, one goal might have been to bond between passengers.

This example leads to the conclusion that mobility has to get mixed “physically and digitally with other fields’ ideas.

So of course we wanted to be part of the thing and, to get ideas, we all brainstormed to add new features, values and so on to the mobility experience.

Obviously it would be tough to describe every idea we had but let’s say that our core values are: human ties, networks (of energy, information, people, etc.) spirituality and pleasure, among others.

These were then drawn by some of the participants …

dominique cardon stephane vial pierre musso mette thomsen martin tamke dassault systèmes 3DS DS4 system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3dvia exalead swym 3Dswym draftsight 3Dperspectives 3Dperspective 3D CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 PLM2.0 lifelike experience system engineering sustainable development design digital era ayse birsel alain renk frédéric jentgen anne asensio mobility transport

So what do you think? Any mobility issue you’d tackle?

Cheers,

Rémi

Design in Life Pt. 1

By Remi
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Dominique Cardon, Stéphane Vial, Mette Thomsen and Martin tamke

As promised I was at Strate College to give you feedback of our event Design in Life. The talks were pretty interesting as there is quite a wide scope of professionals here!

Philosopher Pierre Musso, followed by sociologist Dominique Cardon, focused on “bottom-up innovation”: what is it, and how we can use it? It was mainly about shifting our vision of innovation but let me explain…

Our (humanity’s) usual pattern seems to go: “I imagine something but it’s only possible for me to co-create something with people that share the same mindset. Only next will I open this to a wider audience.”

According to Mr. Cardon, innovation can be fostered if you look at it conversely: “I imagine something and immediately share it with the widest audience. Only then will the co creation begin.” And it’s because the thing imagined was done for a local context and problem that the desire to share arises. The innovation is personal.

The idea behind this new pattern is to give an unexpected direction to the original creation: a way that wasn’t the initially thought one. How many times did you do or say something that was not interpreted as you wanted to? This is the same concept! :-)

And what followed these two presentations was a perfect illustration! Philosopher Stéphane Vial talked about design and what it can do in the digital era from a philosopher’s point of view. And next, digital researchers Mette Thomsen and Martin Tamke did the same… but from a designer’s standpoint.

What happened is that they talked about the same topic but so differently it felt like they were from Mars and Venus. What does that mean? It means that design, just like any other field, can benefit from others’ thinking (philosophers, economists, journalists, etc.) to co create!

This way, design professionals would do what Dominique Cardon said: submit an idea to a wider audience so that co creation reaches new unexpected territories. This is the objective of Design in Life.

Personally I tend to think that what’s missing is to filter the brand new ideas to help those that are most interesting from a societal and economic point of view rise to the top. Another new approach just for the sake of it is useless… so what are our options? What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi

3 questions to Ayse Birsel

By Remi
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ayse birsel seck dassault systèmes design in life strate college system systemes systeme catia delmia solidworks enovia simulia 3dvia exalead draftsight swym 3dswym CAD CAM PLM 2.0 De/Re deconstruction reconstruction innovation problem solve issueI recently had the opportunity to have a chat with Ayse Brisel, who runs Birsel+Seck design studio. She’s going to be part of a 3DS event soon (Design in Life) so I thought it’d be nice to introduce her and her concepts!

Can you tell me about your design concept: Deconstruction & Reconstruction?

Often Designers are asked about how they think and it’s a challenge to explain the process of design. In the last two years, I tried to articulate my process and Deconstruction & Reconstruction (De/Re) is the result of that.

We are all shaped by our preconceptions. Objects, situations and reality come to us prepackaged as a coherent whole. De/Re is about breaking our preconceptions to free our minds to imagine an array of new hypothesis.

One of my favorite examples of De/Re thinking outside of my work is the Dyson Air Multiplier. It pulls apart the conventional idea of a fan to eliminate its most fundamental part, the blade, and reconstructs a new hypothesis around how to blow air without it. It breaks the status quo to remind you of what you were trying to solve in the first place, which in Dyson’s case was moving air, freeing you to think about new and hopefully better ways of doing it.

I’ve read a lot that you look at your life as a design project… Can you tell me more about that?

When I was articulating De/Re as a process, I thought that it would be interesting to see if this process could be applied to designing one’s life. I like to think of life as our most important project and yet most of us think that we don’t have much control over our lives.

So my point is: ok we can’t control everything, but we can start imagining and designing the kind of life we’d like. So I started a series of workshops called “Design the Life You Love”, to teach people, non-designers as well as designers, to think about life with imagination and originality.

One part of this process is asking people to look at what the Dominant, Subdominant and Subordinate parts of their life are. Another way of saying this is, what is central to your life, what supports that center and what completes it.

Since there are only three parts, it forces people to look at what matters for them in their lives and the hierarchy between them (say, family, friends and work). If you want to have more, you need to resolve dichotomies to figure out how you can get more value within these constraints. Just like a design problem!

Often, people at my workshops are at a point in their life where they want to change something but they don’t know exactly what. So this helps shifting their point of view, and even if they don’t act on it, they learn to think about life differently, creatively, using design tools.

What future do you see for the design industry?

These days, my thinking is that we’re problem solvers, as well as team players. We’re really good at dichotomy resolution, bringing opposing ideas together to create new meaning and value.

So my point is that the design industry will increasingly help people to design their lives and address world problems. There are so many issues (poverty, women rights, democracy, etc.) where our creative thinking can definitely come up with 1+1=3 kinds of solutions, in collaboration with other people and disciplines.

And that’s why I like Deconstruction & Reconstruction; it’s a systematic and learned process around solving problems, but without loosing the whole intuitive and imaginary part of design.

 

Pretty interesting right? I was personally thrilled by De/Re… it’s quite a problem solving method! What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi

P.S.: I’ll be live blogging and tweeting at the event next week so stay tuned! :)