Spotlight on buildingSMART: Driving an open approach to design and construction evolution

By Akio

When Richard Petrie joined buildingSMART as chief executive officer in 2013, he took on the goal of driving the standards-writing organization’s growth — in order to drive change across the entire architecture, engineering and construction industry.

RichardPetrieBuildingSmart_03.2015

Richard Petrie, CEO of buildingSMART

Having worked in construction as both contractor and client, Petrie has seen firsthand the frustrations of a slow-to-evolve architecture, engineering and construction industry. From within buildingSMART — a not-for-profit organization that has been working to standardize the language and processes of BIM (Building Information Modeling) users since 1995 — Petrie has observed an increasing emphasis from several European governments on improving construction efficiency.

“All of those governments have very serious social needs that they have to fulfill with increasingly limited budgets,” Petrie says. “Completing these projects in the best way possible is very important, and you can’t do that if you don’t have accurate and clear data.”

buildingSMART is setting out to provide that data by leading the entire building industry into the digital economy.

Overcoming Fragmentation

There are two key challenges in architecture, engineering and construction industry that buildingSMART is seeking to address.

First is the fragmentation of the supply chain.12 As designers, builders and owners expand their focus to the entire life cycle, it becomes increasingly important to understand how each component and system impacts others. While savvy suppliers are integrating vertically, providing inter-related products, services and knowledge, many designers are finding the information they need through sharable information made possible by BIM.

Second, Petrie finds, construction clients are rarely well informed about the construction, building management and asset ownership process, which means they are also fragmented. For example, the efficiency to which buildings are designed isn’t always met in operation. This is in part because product data isn’t easily transferred from designers and builders to owners and facility managers.

“Altogether, this disjointed relationship with clients and the fragmentation of the supply chain is a great drag on the transformation of the industry,” Petrie says.

Tweet: The #AEC industry is plagued w/ fragmentation & miscommunication. @openbim & @buildingSMART offer a solution. @3DSAEC http://ctt.ec/dP4ea+Click to tweet: “The #AEC industry is plagued w/ fragmentation &
miscommunication. @openbim & @buildingSMART offer a solution.”

 Creating a Universal Approach to Construction

buildingSMART describes openBIM as a “universal approach” to the collaborative design, realization and operation of buildings based on open standards, such as its IFC family of standards. This approach allows all project members to participate in modeling, regardless of the software tools they use; it creates a common language for widely referenced processes; and it provides one system for housing asset data over its entire life-cycle.

Petrie sees openBIM as a solution to the industry’s fragmentation challenges and buildingSMART as a path to the significant opportunities for improvement in building and infrastructure cost, value and environmental performance.

“I believe those opportunities are only truly available with open international standards and, in order to create those open international standards, a neutral entity for the development and promulgation of those standards is needed,” Petrie explains. “That is the role buildingSMART International is taking on.”

With its newly defined vision, the volunteer-driven organization has made major headway in the past year. From creating new standards to defining data to the harmonization of processes across the supply chain, the group has demonstrated real progress and results.

The Push for Interoperability

The group’s push for progress aligns with demand from several governments. As a case in point: Petrie indicates the UK government’s push for interoperability as an example of where openBIM is heading.

While the UK has had requirements for open data since 2012, in 2016 the government will formally launch a program in which procurements must use BIM Level 2 documents.

This set of methodologies is designed to introduce the construction supply chain to trading and operating in a data environment, allowing the government to focus on the strongest leaders and drive value for its spending programs.

It’s a demand driven not by technology, Petrie says, but a cultural shift resulting from seeing real change in how each construction dollar is spent. “That is the reality that will provide the real driver to ensure that this program moves forward the way we hope it will,” he says.

Petrie adds that thus far the group is achieving its predicted targets in the UK, and work is underway for a Level 3 program slated for 2020-2025.

Tweet: Demand for #BIM L2 is a result of seeing change in how each construction dollar is spent @buildingSMART @3DSAEC #AEC http://ctt.ec/o1bHe+Click to tweet: “Demand for #BIM L2 is a result of
seeing change in how each construction dollar is spent”

The Smart Future of Building

To expand the organization’s work, Petrie is seeking to build a community of experts to ensure that future standards accurately reflect the needs of real-world users. Volunteers work at both the international and chapter level, in an integrated process for developing new standards and deploying them into user communities.

buildingSMART graphic_03.2015

Membership in buildingSMART International is open to companies, government bodies and institutions from around the world. Dassault Systèmes joins buildingSMART as an International Member, with full voting membership rights on the new Standards Committee and membership rights with buildingSMART chapters.

The company joins other leading proponents of openBIM that recognize the benefits from openBIM can achieve the greatest impact and momentum by working together in a common community.

Members benefit from the collective activities of other members locally and internationally, and play an active role not only in identifying issues, but also in the development of solutions.

The nature of buildingSMART is that it is a voluntary organization where solutions are developed on a mutually supportive co-developed basis, and so we need members to be active in our community,” Petrie explains.

Petrie acknowledges that it will take time to develop and communicate the organization’s mission, but, he adds, “The changes that we are hoping will be available as a result of these new standards will not only affect the technical communities, but will have implications for the way in which companies function.

Tweet: Spotlight on @buildingSMART: Driving an open approach to design and #construction evolution @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/dfNk2+Click to tweet this article.

 

Related Resources:

Dassault Systemes Architecture, Engineering and Construction Solutions

buildingSMART website

White Paper: End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3

Lean Construction Advanced Project Delivery: Blinded by Convention

By Akio

Delivery of capital programs involves a complex and dynamic integration of people, organizations, and systems. Breaking the silos that exist within projects and achieving a harmonious flow of work effort that exceeds value expectations (time, cost, quality, safety, functionality, form, and delivery experience) is a commonly sought desire.

Unfortunately, unintended consequences of conventional project management approaches are the development of silos and sub‐optimization of efforts that compromise delivering what customers and stakeholders originally wanted or needed.

CCwhitepaper

The moment the contracts are signed, participants (owners, designers, engineers, general contractors, design/build contractors, subcontractors, vendors, and others) set in motion forces that lessen their influence and control of the project.

* Owners want the risk of project execution to be with their designers and contractors.

* Designers and contractors cannot or will not carry all of this risk, so they transfer as much of the risk as possible to their sub‐consultants, sub‐contractors, and suppliers; and where possible back to the owner.

* Project contracts then attempt to protect each organization’s risk exposure and seek to limit interactions between parties for fear of losing control or a perceived advantage.

* Project participants are reluctant to intervene or participate in the planning, control, and management of others’ work for fear of taking back responsibility for its outcome.

* Effective working relationships have become supplanted by contract‐defined points‐of‐contact, staffing, and reporting requirements.

* Layers of contracts isolate the project participants from where project execution decisions are made. As a result, decisions and actions that affect the project value are being made with minimal visibility and/or accountability.

The contractors’ and subcontractors’ control of projects are severely compromised, and owners’ or designers’ ability to intervene on their own behalf to resolve problems or pursue improvement opportunities is greatly diminished. Fragmented decision‐making, weak collaboration and isolation of the project participants are conditions that work against addressing the complexity of today’s projects.

Even the most skillful and conscientious project managers with the most sophisticated programming tools are challenged to understand the total project information and work flow.

Without effective real‐time information exchange and work planning collaboration, each organization focuses on meeting its contract obligations with the limited information available to it. Inefficiencies, sub‐optimization and lost opportunities result from working in isolation, embedding waste in all forms and at great expense to the project.

Costs do not exist to be calculated. Costs exist to be reduced.” ‐ Taiichi Ohno, creator of the Toyota Production System

Tweet: Costs do not exist to be calculated. Costs exist to be reduced – Taiichi Ohno | #AEC #LeanCon @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/93wzN+

Click to tweet: “Costs do not exist to be calculated.
Costs exist to be reduced – Taiichi Ohno”

Current project management approaches and closed systems do not address these problems. Owners who have experienced their projects running behind schedule will recall the frustration of not knowing

the precise cause of the delay or what has to be done to resolve it. Too often project participants are given inadequate, misleading, or unintentionally false information about the causes of delays to projects. Recovery plans are usually based more on hope than on rigorous analysis founded on hard data.

Because of the complex and dynamic nature of projects, we tend to blindly accept that each organization is capable of planning and executing the work they are contracted for in the most efficient and effective manner for the project. The reality is that project entities essentially act independently of each other.

The barriers that have developed have greatly diminished the ability of the Owner to influence project execution; either to resolve issues or pursue opportunities. The Owner pays significantly for the cost of embedded inefficiencies, accepts the consequences of flaws in project delivery, and hopes that retained risk can at least be contained within bloated budgets and contingencies.

This state of construction delivery is not what any rational organization should ever want. Adopting and relentlessly pursuing Lean Project Delivery is a proven approach for organizations to achieve better project outcomes.

Fernando Espana, President, Corner Cube, Inc.

Fernando Espana, President, Corner Cube, Inc.

To learn more, read the full white paper “Lean Construction ‐ Advanced Project Delivery for the AEC Industry” from Dassault Systèmes’ Value Solution Business Partner CornerCube.

CornerCube is a Dassault Systèmes partner located in the San Francisco Bay area, offering Lean construction solutions, 3D technology solutions, and related technical services to the AEC industry.

 

Click to tweet this article.Tweet: #LeanConstruction Advanced Project Delivery: Blinded by Convention | #AEC @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/7ts5a+

 


 

 Related Resources

 Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Lean Construction – Advanced project Delivery for the AEC Industry White Paper

CornerCube White Paper image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interview with CornerCube

 

 

 

 

The Advantages of Prefabrication for AEC

By Patrick

This post is part of a series of articles found in “Prefabrication and Industrialized Construction,” a Dassault Systèmes whitepaper.


Where prefabrication is possible, a number of benefits make these systems attractive to building owners.

Prefabricated systems can lead to reduced labor costs, safer projects, and fewer delays—and often results in an overall higher quality product than can be achieved with traditional stick-built projects.

 

Workers construct a modular structure in a manufacturing facility. ©iStock.com/EdStock

Workers construct a modular structure in a manufacturing facility. ©iStock.com/EdStock

 

Reduced Labor Costs

Prefabricated systems simplify the installation process, requiring fewer workers onsite to complete a task.

Because the most complex components are assembled in a specialized manufacturing environment, prefabrication reduces the need for skilled laborers. Skilled trade people need only be used onsite for the final connection of systems, such as wiring or ductwork.

Improved Safety

Not only does prefabrication lower labor costs, but by shortening the amount of time spent onsite, laborers are able to get in and out more safely.

Tweet: #Prefab shortens the time spent onsite so laborers are able to get in & out more safely. @3DSAEC #AECClick to tweet: “#Prefab shortens the time spent onsite
so laborers are able to get in & out more safely.”

Laborers working in a controlled factory environment don’t have to brave jobsite hazards such as ice or winter chills, unsafe access to electricity, or dangerous heights. A factory-controlled environment also makes it possible to supply components and equipment where the worker needs it, rather than having workers moving parts through an active jobsite.

Minimized Delays

Sequencing for stick-built projects follows a typical pattern: each trade moves in to complete its portion of the building once the previous trade has completed its work. That means an unexpected delay in ductwork installation can push back wall framing, which then moves the schedule for the electricians who are already working around another project, and so on.

Prefabrication minimizes the need for coordination among subcontractors because electrical, ductwork, and other necessary components are installed within the wall as it’s being fabricated, requiring minimal onsite coordination.

What’s more, because the majority of work is done inside, there is no need for delays due to weather, and shift work can be performed around the clock.

Improved Quality of Finished Project

Prefabrication work is typically completed in a specialized, centralized factory. Suppliers might use a permanent location or a temporary warehouse close to the jobsite to reduce the logistics of transporting finished products.

A major advantage of working in this enclosed environment is that it allows for greater quality control than is possible on a typical jobsite. Producing these complex systems in a manufacturing environment keeps jobsite dust, dirt, and other contaminants out of sensitive systems. It allows for more oversight of each step of the process.

Once completed systems arrive onsite, surveying devices such as transits help installers to precisely locate where each component needs to be installed. Expert tradesmen must simply connect the final pieces.

Expanding Benefits

While not every project—or every system within a project—may be able to take advantage of prefabrication, today’s new technology allows even highly custom systems to take advantage of these benefits to workers and building owners.

Tweet: Advantages of #Prefab for #AEC @3DSAEC Click to tweet this article:
“Advantages of Prefab for AEC”

Patrick Mays, Expert Business Experience Consultant AEC at Dassault SystèmesPatrick Mays, AIA

With over 30 years of AEC experience, Mr. Mays is part of the core team driving the AEC industry strategy at Dassault Systèmes. Mr. Mays was the General Manager for North America at Graphisoft, and served as CIO at NBBJ Architects where he led the firm’s transition to BIM in the 1990s.

 


Whitepaper: Prefabrication and industrialized construction

Related Resources

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience by Dassault Systèmes

Download the full whitepaper: Prefabrication and Industrialized Construction



Page 1 of 41234
3ds.com

Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.