Realistic Simulation Supports Expansion of the London Underground

By Akio

Dubbed “one of the most complex tunneling projects in the U.K.,” the Bond Street Station Upgrade (BSSU) project is being carried out to satisfy growing traffic demands within London’s busiest shopping district, the West End.

Upon its completion, Bond Street Station’s daily passenger numbers are expected to rise from 155,000 to 225,000.

A project this complex in nature has to consider the existing tunnel infrastructure, as well as the stress and strains imposed by the surrounding soil layers for the development of new tunnels.

Dr. Sauer and Partners was contracted to provide such tunneling expertise. The company took on responsibility for preliminary-to-detailed design and construction on all BSSU sprayed concrete lined (SCL) tunnels.

Tweet: The Bond Street Station Upgrade utilized realistic #simulation to test preliminary tunnel designs. @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/X4UWh+Click to tweet: “The Bond Street Station Upgrade utilized
realistic #simulation to test preliminary tunnel designs.”

 

Using FEA simulation, they were able to virtually test the ground through which the tunnels are being dug alongside the existing tunnel structures.

Model1.000

This realistic assessment enabled them to improve upon the preliminary design, as well as bring greater confidence to the overall approval process.

To learn more, read the case study, “Tunnel Vision” to see how realistic simulation plays an important role in tunnel excavation.

We also encourage you to download the whitepaper by Ali Nasekhian, Sr. Tunnel/Geotechnical engineer at Dr. Sauer and Partners, which highlights the merits and shortcomings of large 3D models in tunneling.

Tweet: Realistic #Simulation Supports Expansion of the #LondonUnderground @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/dU4NO+

Click to tweet this article.

 


Related resources:

White Paper: “Mega 3D-FE Models in Tunneling Bond Street Station Upgrade Project”

Case Study: “Tunnel Vision”

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction Solutions

SIMULIA Solutions page

Challenges Driving the Industrialization of Construction

By Akio

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

A monumental and historical study conducted by the National Research Council of the National Academies on behalf of NIST outlined the challenges and obstacles facing the construction industry.

BREAKINGWITHTRADITION2-200x300

Fragmentation of the Industry

“The sheer number of construction firms (760,000 in 2004) and their size—only 2 percent had 100 or more workers, while 80 percent had 10 or fewer workers—make it difficult to effectively deploy new technologies, best practices, or other innovations across a critical mass of owners, contractors, and subcontractors.

Tweet: Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer. @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC http://ctt.ec/eTAeP+Click to tweet: “Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer.”

The industry is also segmented into least four distinct sectors—residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy construction.

Interconnectivity and Interoperability

  • Its diverse and fragmented set of stakeholders: owners, users, designers, constructors, suppliers, manufacturers, operators, regulators, manual laborers, and specialty trade contractors including plumbers, electricians, masons, carpenters, and roofers.
  • Its segmented processes: planning and financing, design, engineering, procurement, construction, operations, and maintenance. Each process involves different groups of stakeholders, and shifting levels of financial risk.
  • The image of the industry—work that is cyclical, low tech, physically exhausting, and unsafe—which makes it difficult to attract skilled workers.
  • The one-of-a-kind, built-on-site nature of most construction projects.
  • Variation in the standards, processes, materials, skills, and technologies required by different types of construction projects.
  • Variation in building codes, permitting processes, and construction-related regulations by states and localities.
  • Lack of an industry-wide strategy to improve construction efficiency.
  • Lack of effective performance measures for construction-related tasks, projects, or the industry as a whole.
  • Lack of an industry-wide research agenda and inadequate levels of funding for research.

The industry is moving to address these challenges.

To learn how, download the white paper “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Heather Moore.

Tweet: How does the history of industrialization inform #AEC industry? @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @AgileConst http://ctt.ec/9cna5+Click to tweet: “How does the history of
industrialization inform #AEC industry?”

This post is an excerpt from the white paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Dr. Heather Moore. Commissioned by Dassault Systemes and prepared by MCA Inc., this whitepaper focuses on industrialization of construction industry.

It maps out the construction industry challenges, relates the history of industrialization in the manufacturing industry, and summarizes five critical aspects and approaches.

 

Tweet: Challenges Driving the Industrialization of #Construction | @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/0eQKb+Click to tweet this article

 


Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Download Lean Construction Solution Brief

White Paper: Industrialization of the Construction Industry

MCA® Website

The Case for Industrialization of the Construction Industry

By Akio

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

Like many other industries the construction industry is under constant pressure to improve productivity, reduce cost, and minimize waste in the operation.

While the productivity in the manufacturing industry has improved by four hundred percent (400%) over the last century, the construction industry’s productivity has, in the best case, stayed flat or turned negative.

Tweet: Problem: Over the last 100 yrs productivity in the #AEC industry has, in best case, stayed flat. Solution: http://ctt.ec/mf0SU+ @3DSAECClick to tweet: “Problem: over the 100 yrs productivity in the #AEC
industry has, in the best case, stayed flat. Solution: industrialization”

One main reason for the improvement of the manufacturing and other industries’ productivity is the “Industrialization” of those industries. Industrialization of any industry will rely on the following five factors:

  1. Management of Labor
  2. Management of work
  3. Lean Operations
  4. Modeling and Simulation
  5. Feedback from the source

The driver for establishing and applying industrialization in manufacturing was the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Currently no known association is leading this mission in the construction industry.

A marked result of the advancement in productivity of the manufacturing industry is the relative price of an automobile.  Whilst the cost of an automobile has gone from 140% in 1910 of the average national per capita income in the United States down to 33% in 2012, the cost of an average dwelling has gone up from 333% to 619% of per capita income during the same period.

Tweet: Since 1910 automobile production cost decreased 75%. The cost of a dwelling has doubled. Time to industrialize @3DSAEC http://ctt.ec/Urcfa+Click to tweet: “Since 1910 automobile production cost decreased
75%. Production cost of a dwelling has doubled. Time to industrialize”

This post is an excerpt from the white paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Dr. Heather Moore. Commissioned by Dassault Systemes and prepared by MCA Inc., this whitepaper focuses on industrialization of construction industry. It maps out the construction industry challenges, relates the history of industrialization in the manufacturing industry, and summarizes five critical aspects and approaches.

Download the whitepaper and start accelerating the “Industrialization of the Construction Industry” through lessons learned from manufacturing and other industries.

Tweet: The Case for Industrialization of the #Construction Industry @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/Uz_OK+Click to tweet this article

 

Akio MoriwakiAkio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes’ head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART

Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Download Lean Construction Solution Brief

White Paper: Industrialization of the Construction Industry

MCA® Website



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