Fujitsu: Improved management process thanks to an efficient reuse of requirements and traceability

By Eric

In requirements management, we have achieved a 30 percent to 40 percent improvement in its management processes, including traceability and reuse of requirements” explains Peter Servi, Senior Manager for Enterprise PLM and Engineering Applications at Fujitsu.

To help eliminate the churn and streamline its processes, Fujitsu turned to Dassault Systèmes and its high-tech solutions on the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, custom built for the way high tech companies work.

Fujitsu Network Communications needed to speed time to market by eliminating inefficiencies in its requirements management and test case management processes while maintaining the highest level of product quality.

Fujitsu chose the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform to address requirements, traceability and test. The goal is to improve Fujitsu’s data visibility, eliminate rework, and streamline product development from initial customer requirement to manufacturing.

Discover the full Fujitsu Network Communications customer story in which you will learn how the company has reduced flow-time by at least 20%, reduced quality issues by at least 10%, and improved security as well as data search, history and reporting.

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Hi-Tech Trade Wars

By Robert

With the global recession in full swing we see some cracks appearing within the global movement towards ‘free trade’ (the trade between nations without protective customs tariffs), and these cracks appear to be moving towards a more regulated environment. Governments are increasingly adding regulation to favor locally manufactured products as a way to support local economy growth.

This is nothing new when you look at the BAA, NAFTA, G7, and the ‘China Government Procurement Program’ as good examples of ‘free trade’ with some regulations, restrictions, or down-right favoritism. What is new is the pace at which changes are being proposed and in some cases forced upon the global enterprise in terms of compliance as a way to push for localized growth in a recessionary environment.

What does this mean for the future of compliance?

Well, we can see from our experience with materials and substance compliancy that software solutions are often needed in order to comply efficiently. The tracking of compliance to numerous and varying government mandates from different regions becomes overwhelming on an ad-hoc or manual basis. Compliancy roll-ups related to trade compliance will require the right schema, good business processes, and a scalable platform.

PLM may be the right place to start such an endeavor since the ability to manage rolled-up data from items to assemblies, and the tracking of engineered, planned, and manufactured BOMs are capabilities that already exist today.

Extensions to allow for end-to-end trade compliance tracking by country-of-origin/trade region, commodity spend and other parameters are also capabilities that fit well within the context of PLM, and allow for the possibility of a single version of the truth for trade compliance reporting and analysis.

Of course, this becomes a complex topic based upon the complexity of today’s hi-tech supply chains. One only has to ‘look under the hood’ of any mobile device or laptop to see the global nature of technologies and components that are involved in any single product.

We should all keep our eyes out on the opportunities and risks presented by the slippery slope of ‘free trade’ into ‘regulated trade’. What is clear is that the landscape is changing.

Please feel free to comment on this thread with your thoughts and opinions on trade compliance, and the opportunities and threats this topic to offers the hi-tech enterprise and supply-chain.

Best,
Robert

Sustainable Enterprise Backbone with Green PLM

By Brian

It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything on PLM as an Enterprise Backbone. With the global economy the way it is, it is a good time to be alive, economically speaking. This blog post covers the third pillar of the PLM enterprise backbone: sustainable development and regulatory compliance.

The core product and design data managed in PLM is crucial for today’s businesses to manage for their environmental impacts as well as their ability to comply with regulations.

Eco-Design / Sustainability and Regulatory Compliance require integration of the design and development systems with the extended enterprise to manage product impact across engineering, supply chains, manufacturing, distribution, after-market service and maintenance, as well as end-of-life processes (disposal, energy conversion and / or recycling).

Suppliers and engineering can be incorporated into the material compliance evaluation process to ensure the component library contains the most current material compositions and compliance certifications for supplied parts, such as RoHS (Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances) and WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) in electrical and electronic equipment, IMDS (International Material Data Systems) reporting and ELV (End-of-Life Vehicle) in automotive, and REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals), across many discreet and process manufacturing industries.

Working from a PLM basis, companies can explicitly manage their environment posture, from straight compliance-based, to systematic management, all the way to being full pioneers on the leading edge of industry.

PLM enables companies to implement Design for Compliance functions as an integral part of product development. With PLM solutions, product development teams can check material content information from any design early on and throughout the product development cycle. Reports can be generated to compare the compliance of manufacturing equivalents, list recyclable content, or evaluate best and worst manufacturing locations. This information can be cross-referenced against multiple regulations in all geographies, allowing designers to make changes sooner rather than later.

In medical device markets regulatory compliance also needs to be validated to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements throughout the product introduction process. These regulations cover Corrective and Preventive Actions (CAPAs), Nonconformance Reports (NCRs), Product Complaints, Design Control Deliverables, Design History Files, and Quality Audits. Enterprise-wide change control needs to be in place to manage modifications to all documents, specifications, procedures and product configurations to minimize the risk of FDA audit driven plant shut-downs.

From a regulatory compliance standpoint, PLM needs to be managed as a mission-critical enterprise system.

Product companies can avoid late-stage design changes and explore ways of improving product designs while still meeting compliance requirements. Companies can also reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials and substances in their products, thereby avoiding problems such as launch delays, recalls, fines, poor customer satisfaction and a damaged public image.

In addition to regulatory compliance, PLM systems are critical to a company’s overall environmental performance. More than 80% of the ecological impact of a product across manufacturing, usage, maintenance and repair, and end-of-life disposal is determined during initial product design.

Upcoming regulations may even impact the energy efficiency of an entire value-chain, as well as its carbon footprint. This will require companies to manage a portfolio of eco-design initiatives for a product’s material, energy and carbon impacts, necessitating lifecycle analysis and product management through design, sourcing, manufacturing, distribution, and end-of-life processes.

Figures 1 and 2, below, depict a large complex enterprise framework for managing a portfolio of project for sustainable development. Other PLM backbone capabilities come to play including Project and Portfolio Management, Direct Material Sourcing, and Extended Enterprise Collaboration capabilities.

Figure 1: Corporate Level Integrated Environmental Management

Figure 1: Corporate Level Integrated Environmental Management

Figure 2: Lifecycle Analysis (LCA) across a cradle-to-cradle mapping of the industrial ecosystem

Figure 2: Lifecycle Analysis (LCA) across a cradle-to-cradle mapping of the industrial ecosystem

Just a blog article doesn’t really give the space to treat this topic in-depth, but Dassault Systemes is making major investments and initiatives in solutions for Sustainable Development. Those wishing to read further on our company’s approach can review our new corporate report.

The last pillar of PLM as an enterprise backbone will complete the innovation spiral enabled by PLM in a discussion of Integrated New Product Market Launch, as facilitated by PLM.

More later about the fourth pillar of PLM as your enterprise backbone . . .

Best,

Brian

Related posts:

PLM as the Enterprise Backbone: Emerging with Advantage

PLM Enterprise Backbone Pillar 1: Product Portfolio Management

PLM Enterprise Backbone Pillar 2: Working with the Supply Chain



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