Virtualizing the Digital Factory

By Alyssa
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Imagine your team designs an innovative new seat for a car. Everyone is excited about how it will improve driver and passenger experience. But when it is ready to put into production, the mood plummets: the seats won’t fit into the car.  You are left with the choice to redesign the manufacturing or redesign the product.  Whichever you choose, you are losing production time, driving up costs and missing out on selling time in the market.

There is a better way. Manufacturing has two critical phases – planning how to manufacture a product, and then executing that plan. Leading manufacturers are applying immersive virtuality (iV) technologies at both points.

Much has been made of the role of iV in design. But iV also can play a critical role in manufacturing.  It is imperative to know during the design stage how the product will be manufactured…or if it’s even possible.  And since errors made when designing a product can easily be replicated during manufacturing, innovative companies are recognizing that applying iV – with its ability to allow 3D models to be examined at life-size scale – can help problems to be spotted more readily, before production begins.

We invite you to read “Error-Free Manufacturing” in the latest issue of Compass to discover more – including an example from Embraer – about how applying iV technology can impact the manufacturing process by helping to plan and simulate production.  You’ll also learn about the emerging role that augmented reality (AR) is having on the factory floor by drawing data from the manufacturers’ industrial information systems – including PLM – to create a virtual product guide to allow workers to complete tasks with greater speed and accuracy.

Supporting the Next Generation of Designers

By Alyssa
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Youngse Kim was born in Korea, but moved to Silicon Valley where he became a celebrated designer of consumer electronics products. Bill Gates called Kim’s iriver MP3 player “a leading design product of the digital era.”

But even after more than 3 decades in California where he founded the high-tech design firm INNO Design, he never forgot where he came from.  Korea has been largely known as a manufacturer of low-cost products, but Kim knew the country was home to many great designers who needed more resources to bring their ideas to market.  To help them along, he founded Design Accelerator Lab (DXL-Lab) in Pangyo, at the heart of Korea’s Techno Valley.

Many Korean designers seek to work at INNO Design, but the firm simply can’t employ all interested applicants.  Kim found a solution with DXL-Lab, which not only helps encourage the design process but also supports other aspects of the development process required to get a product that consumers want into the market.  Key to the program is a cloud-based platform that allows aspiring designers to connect with INNO Design experts and potential investors. Every step of the collaborative process happens on the platform.

Compass recently took a look at the vision for DXL-Lab, and its “Design Together” philosophy.   Learn more about what the organization is doing, including some early successful projects like the Hycore electric bike wheel set to be released in 2017.

Transforming disadvantaged communities with healthy, affordable food

By Alyssa
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Two of America’s most celebrated chefs separately identified a problem. Daniel Patterson – the Michelin two-star chef of San Francisco restaurant Coi – and Roy Choi – street food king and founder of Kogi – both recognized that there are many ‘food deserts’ in the United States: parts of the country with little of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas and largely due to a lack of grocery stores, farmers’ markets, and healthy food providers.

A chance meeting in Copenhagen resulted in LocoL: a fast food restaurant (and roaming food truck) that provides tasty, nutritious and affordable food to communities that have limited healthy choicesRather than try to go outside of the fast food culture, the chefs embraced the tried-and-true concept but focused on offering healthier food options while retaining the low price point.

The result: a restaurant that serves the community nutritious meals, while providing jobs that can build skills in an underemployed workforce.  LocoL’s founders also aim to drive more kindness, compassion and positivity into the communities in which they are located.

Come learn more about what inspired the chefs in an interview that Compass conducted with Patterson, and how they continue to evolve the menu and their long-term goals and vision for LocoL.  You’ll also find there a link to a video that takes a close-up look inside the Watts location, allowing you to virtually experience the food and atmosphere.

 



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