Revolutionizing Smart Appliance Innovation through Collaboration

By Neno
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According to Berg Insight, in 2014, smart appliances made up one-third of the estimated 5.9 billion smart and connected products sold worldwide: that’s 2 billion smart appliances. With that level of production, and a market growing at an estimated CAGR of 15.4% toward a value of $37.2 billion USD by 2020 (MarketsandMarkets), there’s no doubt about it: customers love smart appliances.

Puremotion video washing machineIn the recent post “A New Spin on Washing Machine Design”, we explained how customers today expect more than just a product when they do business with a company: they would rather spend money on an experience than a thing. The ability of smart appliances to deliver delightful, intuitive experiences that make daily life easier and more pleasurable is in large measure the key to the smart appliance market’s success.

This is a theme we returned to in “The Secret to Creating Market-Winning Experiences”, in which we explored the use of collaborative simulation and design exploration software to help craft these compelling experiences, enabling manufactures to simulate virtual product experiences while evaluating and analyzing hundreds of design options.

engineer-puremotionSuch advanced software is invaluable because at technical level, designing great smart appliance experiences can be a daunting challenge. It requires that companies have engineering proficiency in a wide array of areas such as software, mechanical, electrical, fluid, electronics, software, and other specialized areas.  What’s more, success requires bringing all of these competencies together to collaboratively develop requirements, solve problems and optimize outcomes (see our post “How to Stay Competitive? Develop Smart Appliances in the Era of Experience”).

This kind of collaboration is essential for success in systems engineering in general, but the need for collaboration in the fast-growing but intensely competitive smart appliance market requires expanding collaboration to an enterprise level. It requires establishing an ongoing dialogue between design, engineering, manufacturing, marketing and support.

We’ve developed a short video, Pure Motion, to introduce the ways in which these disciplines can revolutionize smart appliance innovation through collaboration on a single platform – the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, while leveraging common 3D system models and digital assets across optimized processes.

Watch the video now, or to learn more, visit our white goods webpage or download the V-ZUG case study today, which details how the Swiss High Tech appliance maker is innovating for perfect cooking and washing experiences with the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

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How BIM Will Impact the Civil Design Process

By Akio
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bim for civil design

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#CivilDesign Process | @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS”

BIM: A Game Changer for Civil Design

The AEC industry is moving toward embracing a collaborative environment. It is crucial that owners, designers, engineers, and fabricators have simultaneous and real-time access to design models and project data.

AEC business leaders are advocating for Building Information Modeling (BIM) as the future of infrastructure projects worldwide.

Adopting BIM technologies into the civil design process will enable stakeholders to instantly collaborate with each other on an integrated design platform. BIM can provide for digital sharing and collaborating of models, instead of individually working from drawings.

As a result, BIM will increase efficiency and reduce time and cost, which is imperative due to the scope and pace of civil design projects coming from today’s emerging markets. With large infrastructural projects, BIM is a must.

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@Dassault3DS #AEC #CivilDesign

Without BIM, design changes can be crippling. Cross referencing and approval times drag down productivity and drastically increase construction time and costs. Departments struggle to work coherently with each other. Indexing the work becomes an extra process, thus slowing down the entire project timeline. Teams that depend on drawings, not an integrated BIM model, are unable to fully visualize a structure’s proper angle views due to the limitations of a drawing.

Fortunately, an integrated design platform can avoid these situations.

For AEC stakeholders, BIM is the future of the process.

Better Civil Infrastructure Outcomes Through Collaborative Processes

BIM provides visualization, shared information, and accommodates changes. For best results, identify a project suitable for process experimentation, then determine what value you want to get from a BIM tool set.

Significant BIM capabilities to consider include:

  • End-to-End Collaboration. Sharing with digital models is easier than with drawing sets, while also promoting collaboration of ideas. No team member is isolated as in the past. The project team also can now collaborate on cost and pricing as the design progresses, rather than work from one set budget and schedule.
  • 3D Visualization, instead of 2D drawings. Digital imagery captures reality using simulation tools in a shared model in a way that paper cannot capture. Accuracy is enhanced; rework and duplication of drawings across building disciplines is minimized.
  • Flexible Design Changes. A shared model like BIM can accommodate for changes in design during construction, which can be frequent. In the past, this was a very difficult process.
  • Integrated Data. The platform connects to fabrication and construction data. This promotes pre-fabrication and reduces waste.

As implemented by an integrated solution, BIM makes the civil design process easier—and improves the AEC industry as a whole. BIM can ensure a greater level of accuracy in civil infrastructure projects, improve efficiency and productivity, and save money and time.

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#CivilDesign Process | @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS”

Related Resources

WHITEPAPER: “Civil Design Innovation: Industrialization Methodology Achieves Breakthrough in Civil Design”

Civil Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience

Integrated Project Delivery: What AEC Project Owners and Contributors Need to Know

By Akio
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UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay IPD Construction 01

UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay: An IPD success story. 
Image source: www.ucsfmissionbayhospitals.org

What is IPD?

Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a collaborative building delivery method.

IPD integrates diverse stakeholders—owners, engineers, architects, construction companies, contractors, and government agencies—to form a collaborative team under one contract. IPD also incorporates a variety of systems, practices, and business and financial structures. It is a joint venture approach, with shared risks and rewards.

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for #AEC with shared risks & rewards”

Successful IPD has been achieved through many different approaches, including design-assist, design-build, and public-private partnership.

The goal of IPD is faster delivery of a high-quality, cost-effective project.

Traditional Delivery

A project not utilizing IPD can be a fragmented process. In traditional project delivery, various project contributors typically don’t work together efficiently.

Often, teams are assembled on a “just-as-needed” basis. The process is linear and segregated, and information, including costs, is not shared.

Risk is individually managed, while compensation—or reward—is individually pursued.

The result is an overrun budget and schedule, yielding project outcomes below expectations.

Benefits of IPD

Conversely, a project utilizing IPD allows project team members to work together as a single, virtual company. In an IPD approach, key project stakeholders are assembled early in the process.

As a result, IPD leverages the experience, talent, and input of team members from the start.

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talent & input of team members from the start”

Information is openly shared, and decision-making is faster in regards to scheduling, budgeting, and materials. With the right IT infrastructure, IPD can help manage costs, safety, and field conflicts, resulting in reduced waste and increased productivity during a project life cycle.

Coordinated IPD phases, such as conceptualization and design, result in a more efficient—and potentially shorter—construction phase than traditional delivery. The project risk is shared. Compensation is based on collaboration and tied to the project’s overall success. Individual actors have the potential to profit more than under a traditional model.

The AEC industry is faced with global market challenges, such as efficiency, productivity, and high costs. IPD can solve industry challenges and achieve successful outcomes by enabling collaboration among project experts through all phases of design, fabrication, and construction.

Case Study: UCSF at Mission Bay

A recent example of a public works IPD success story is the $1.5-billion University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (UCSF) at Mission Bay in San Francisco, CA.

The collaborative project team comprised the owner, designers, the contractor, and 17 subcontractors. The design-build challenge called for integrating three separate hospitals along one common spine within an 878,000-square-foot structure.

Additional challenges included changing legislation, workflow practices, and technology over an 8-year life cycle.

Furthermore, 18 months after construction began, UCSF added cancer-treatment services to its design, requiring an additional 175,000 square feet. The team segregated out this revised area as a new project to control overall scheduling and budgeting.

Despite the revised design, the UCSF Medical Center was completed in June 2014, one week ahead of schedule, and had a $200-million reduction in budget from the initial estimate.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “IPD enabled @UCSFMBHospitals construction
to finish ahead of sched & $200M under budget”

UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay IPD Construction 03

UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay.
Image source:  www.ucsfmissionbayhospitals.org

Overcoming the Challenges of Adopting IPD

The complexity and size of a project, as well as differences in business models, will influence how willing stakeholders are in participating in the IPD process. The idea of sharing information, balancing financial risk, and being project-focused presents an enormous challenge for companies whose previous experience is based solely in a traditional delivery method.

To be successful, AEC companies will need to overcome a fear of change and be open to collaboration, transparency, and trust. Adopting IPD also has the perception of liability. A contractual agreement assigning risk to each party, however, will adjust participant liability.

Keys to IPD success include:

  • selecting the right project delivery strategy based on project size, complexity, and schedule
  • selecting the right team
  • choosing the right contract
  • establishing an effective compensation structure
  • and implementing an operating model aligned with processes and resources.

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“5 Keys to IPD Success”

Adhering to the core principles of IPD—mutual trust, shared risk and reward, and open communication—are crucial in achieving team integration and overall project success.

Finally, a common collaboration platform, integrated project management tools, and a 3D BIM system to enable the open exchange of data are essential to the successful implementation of an IPD approach. Cloud-based programs are particularly useful for tying together project contributors from all corners of the globe.

IPD Offers a Better Collaboration Framework

Collaboration among the owner, contractors, and design professionals is based on shared information and risk/reward. In the IPD method, the entire team is communicating and is on the same page throughout the project, enabled by collaborative technologies.

The outcomes are improved efficiency and productivity, higher-quality and cost-effective design and construction, faster delivery, reduced liability, and shared profits.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Integrated Project Delivery: What AEC
Project Owners and Contributors Need to Know”


Related Resources

Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience

Civil Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction Solutions from Dassault Systèmes


References: http://www.enr.com/articles/38058-health-care-best-project-ucsf-medical-center-at-mission-bay

 



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