Spotlight on Becher Neme: BIM Expert Pushes a Zero-Change-Order Approach

By Akio
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The team that makes up Neme Design Solutions, a Long Beach, California-based BIM consultancy, specializes in simplifying highly complex projects to enable fabrication.

Led by founder Becher Neme, the firm includes a small team of architects and engineers with more than a decade of experience working onsite with general contractors, and with particular expertise in the CATIA solution.

This combination of field experience and software knowledge has helped the firm carve out a unique niche in model clash detection and resolving interface challenges.

Yesterday’s Improvements Are Today’s Inefficiencies

While Neme notes that the AEC industry has flocked to BIM as a means for improving construction efficiency, the tools commonly used require certain sacrifices.

Case in point, one of the firm’s primary services is coordinating clash detection among BIM models. Today, most general contractors launch a project by meeting with all of the trade contractors.

Dozens of people bring their 3D models and, through a seemingly endless series of meetings, they run clash detection to find potential conflicts among systems. When conflicts are found, each model is updated with the solution.

Neme left these meetings wondering: how much time is invested in preparing for these meetings? How much money is spent on getting all parties involved on the same page? If BIM is about providing project efficiency, how can this process be made more efficient?

A Single-Source Solution

While clash detection can be easy, there’s value to be gained in resolving these conflicts more efficiently. To do so, Neme Design Solutions has explored the single-source model concept.

The idea is that Neme Design Solutions works with the general contractor to create an accurate BIM model before subs are brought on board. A small, highly skilled team creates a highly accurate model. As much as 90 percent of the conflicts can be resolved at this stage.

Tweet: An accurate #BIM model can resolve 90% of #AEC conflicts before subs are brought in @Dassault3DS @becherneme http://ctt.ec/Uyh5a+

Click to tweet: An accurate #BIM model can resolve
90% of #AEC conflicts before subs are brought in

Next, the trade contractors are brought in. Rather than resolving hundreds of modeling conflicts, this wider group fine-tunes the existing model before moving directly to fabrication and installation.

The Peak of Precision

This single-source solution is already in action on several of Neme’s projects.

Among them, the Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center required the high-precision work for which the CATIA software solution is best known. The project features a highly complex ETFE roof with more than 3,000 connection components.

Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center

(images courtesy of Neme DS)

The roofing contractor brought Neme Design Solutions onboard when the sub determined its software could not handle the roof’s intricate geometry.

By developing a comprehensive, single-source 3D model, the roofing team was able to extract fabrication drawings so accurate that only four of the 3,000 components ultimately needed changes.

Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center nodes

Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center nodes

Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center nodes

But it is Tivoli Village—a mixed-use development in Las Vegas—that perhaps best demonstrates the unique benefits possible from single-source models.

General contractor Hardstone Construction took complete charge of this 2 million square foot project. As part of a small team of CATIA experts, Neme was deeply involved in developing a single-source model for the project. He rendered the MEP part of that model to be conflict-free and ready for installation.

Tivoli model

With the help of this process, the $350 million first phase of the Tivoli Village was so efficient that it had virtually no change orders. The general contractor was able to beat the budget in several areas.

Tivoli village

(images courtesy of Neme DS)

Tweet: Single-source #BIM models allowed a $350M proj to yield virtually no change orders #AEC @Dassault3DS @becherneme http://ctt.ec/b6b3_+

Click to tweet: Single-source #BIM models allowed
a $350M proj to yield virtually no change orders

Next Generation Possibilities

Given the promise of single-source models, Neme is looking to what might soon be possible.

The next generation, he suggests, must move 3D models beyond visual representation and conflict resolution tools. Future models should improve installation workflow onsite, further optimize prefabrication, reduce material waste and raise onsite safety standards.

For Neme, CATIA is far and away the preferred platform for creating complex, yet flexible, models. However, he notes that given Dassault’s game-changing results in the aerospace industry, expectations are high from construction players on what the software company can do to transform their standard processes.

Neme notes that the latest update to Dassault’s platform boosts the software to a truly collaborative tool. The cloud-based platform allows project teams to work live in a model from anywhere around the globe. Updates are instantly visible to the entire team.

This capability allows the specific skill set offered by Neme Design Solutions to be available as-needed worldwide, and allows Neme and his team to work on multiple projects across the world at once.

Where to Learn More

Looking to learn more about single-source models? Consider attending this year’s 3DEXPERIENCE Forum in Las Vegas, November 11-12, where Neme is a returning speaker.

For Neme, the event is a must-attend for anyone interested in innovative solutions, as it exposes attendees to how the technology currently being explored in construction is being used in aerospace, industrial design, medical and other highly successful industries—suggesting new possibilities for how construction can move forward.

For more on the 2014 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM, visit: www.3ds.com/3ds-events/3dexperience-forum-nam

Tweet: A Zero-Change-Order Approach for #AEC from #BIM Expert and #3DXforum Speaker @becherneme | @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/55958+

Click to tweet this article


Related Resources

Visit Neme Design Solutions

Connect with Becher Neme on LinkedIn

Learn more about AEC solutions from Dassault Systèmes

Attend the 3DEXPERIENCE Forum, Las Vegas, November 11-12:

3DEXPERIENCE Customer Forum 2014

 


Moment of Truth in Designing a Differentiated Product

By Estelle
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This post originally appeared at Core 77

Watches

The MP3 player wasn’t a new thing when the iPod came out, nor was the iPhone the first smart phone,” observes John Maeda, Design Partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and former president of the Rhode Island School of Design. “But they were the ones that made you give a damn.”

What Maeda describes in that 2011 Huffington Post article is the First Moment of Truth (FMOT)—that moment when a consumer walks into a store, faced with several comparable products and has to make a decision. They pick up MP3 player one, MP3 player two, hold them in their hands and, in that FMOT, decide which one they will purchase. In a world where many products are relatively similar in terms of technology, price, performance and features, design is that differentiator.

That differentiator is what companies like Karten Design try to create. “How do you get mindshare? How do you stand out? How do you create “sticky” stuff? We use design research,” says Stuart Karten, Principal and Founder of Karten Design, a product innovation firm made up of scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, and designers who go out and spend time with the people for whom they are designing products.

CATIA Natural Sketch

We are trying to understand their habits and ceremonies, so that we can create products that fit in with the way people live their lives, making them easier to adopt,” explains Karten. “Most importantly, we are trying to find unmet needs—common needs that are persistent in people’s lives, but aren’t being satisfied through the current products, or even the product categories that are available on the market. We use unmet needs to drive new ideas.”

For consumer electronics, that means not only identifying a target audience and creating a product for them, but also following through on the promise of what the product does. That second piece, known as the Second Moment of Truth (SMOT), is vital to creating a positive, lasting impression with a consumer. “That’s the gauge that you have to use to make a truly successful consumer product,” shares Karten. “It has to look good to earn that first moment of truth, and then you have to deliver on it with a product that holds meaning and value in a person’s life.”

Watch

To ensure a positive FMOT and SMOT, Karten and his team go back to where they start the ideation process—with people. “Take things and put them in front of users quickly. That design principle is embedded in our company,” says Karten. “We want to get feedback from people earlier and quicker in the design process to find out what stands out, which ideas resonate functionally and emotionally. Go to the people.” Earlier feedback means faster iterations, shortening the timeline it takes to put a product on the shelf.

That process involves creating a series of virtual and physical low fidelity mock-ups, iterating and repeating, increasing the fidelity with each round. Virtual prototypes can give focus groups a very realistic visualization of the final product, saving time and money before moving on to physical prototypes. “Thanks to new technologies such as 3D printing, the iterative design process can now happen very quickly and cost effectively, so it’s taking off a lot of time in the product design process—across the board,” says Arieh Halpern, Life Sciences Industry Business Consultant Director at Dassault Systemes. Dassault Systèmes works to create solutions like *Ideation & Concept Design*, which keeps track of requirements and manages concurrent focus groups, helping shorten the timeline from research to market. “You’re now able to work on the same concept design with your focus groups in real time, do your drawings in real time, and then convert those into 3D prints,” explains Halpern.

Watch

Shortening that timeline makes a huge difference in the field of consumer electronics, where a shorter timeline means putting that product in the hand of focus groups for that FMOT and SMOT that much sooner. In a field where design is the differentiator [PDF], that time can make all the difference in the success of a product. “With a consumer electronic product, you have to create something that somebody wants. You have to steal the show,” says Karten. “That’s the first moment of truth.” If a product doesn’t deliver on that first moment of truth, it might be the last.

Want to create your Connected Object  ? Register to the new edition of  MADEin3D™ contest, “Cup of IOT”, the theme is Internet of Things !

CupofIoTThis time again, we are lucky to have cool sponsors & partners with us to organize this worldwide competition: Withings, Nodesign.net, Prodways, ES Numérique, and CapDigital. The winner’s will thus be nicely rewarded !

Register to the community to enter the contest now!

 

Flip the Script: Ask Planning Questions in This Order for Better Project Outcomes

By Patrick
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Architect in field

When architects and planners work with owners, they usually accept a proposed site and think about how to arrange and orient a building on that site.

They develop ideas about what the building should look like in some detail before engaging builders or construction managers in ideas about how the building will be delivered.

Then, if the project cost cannot be brought in line with the budget, another site or an existing building renovation is considered.

AEC teams tend to think first about what to build, then how to build, and finally where else they should think about building.

Perhaps this is the wrong sequence of decision-making and engages the team members in the wrong order.

Tweet: Owners too often rely on recommendations based on experience rather than objective data. #AEC #BIM @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/j72pJ+

Click to Tweet: “Ask AEC planning questions
in a better order for better project outcomes”

What happens if we reversed the sequence? Can a where-how-what sequenceconsidering multiple sites, new and existing buildings, and logistical delivery issues before thinking about the appearance of the buildingdeliver a better result?

(In manufacturing, how a product will be made is just as important as what it looks like, therefore delivery issues are considered from early in the design stage.)

The minimum information required for considering alternative locations and options are:

  • the owner’s requirements, or the space program
  • code and zoning constraints that might differ by location
  • construction cost differences and schedule implications by location

To find the best location, we need a data driven decision-making process that updates space program alternatives against multiple locations with multiple code constraints.

Note: This is a process enabled by an interoperable BIM Level 3 system; it is not possible with disparate data across multiple BIM Level 2 point solutions.

where-how-what approach allows the focus to be on the process of delivering the project, not primarily what it could look like.

With sufficient data to determine if a certain location will permit a facility to be delivered more quickly, or managed more efficiently, an owner can make an informed decision to prioritize project value over the appearance of a building.

Owners rely heavily on the recommendations of their design and construction team, but this advice has traditionally been based on experience rather than objective data.

Tweet: #AEC teams might need to reconsider their decision-making sequence. #BIM @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/4GPBJ+

Click to Tweet: “AEC needs a data-driven process to update
space program alternatives for multiple location options”

When building owners collaborate with finance teams, they benefit from data clearly presented in models that can be updated instantly to compare different scenarios.

Design and construction delivery decisions, by contrast, are made mostly on faith that the opinion of the planning team is correct. In this sense, owners have not been able to directly participate in a truly rational and objective decision making process.

Construction projects that leverage cloud collaboration, 3D models, and interoperable data can predict implications of choices early in the process, enabling owners to make the right where-how-what decisions to support their long-term objectives.

Tweet: Flip the Script: Ask Planning Questions in This Order for Better Project Outcomes #AEC #BIM @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/lq721+

Click to Tweet: “Flip the Script: Why AEC project owners should
switch from What-How-Where to Where-How-What”


Related Resources:

Integrated Planning – An AEC Industry Solution from Dassault Systèmes

CATIA Building Space Planning

Building Space Planning on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform



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