How Microsoft Devices Group Streamlined its Global Development and Manufacturing Processes

By Estelle

 

Microsoft phone devices

Mobile devices and phones are a ubiquitous part of our daily lives.  Various manufacturers have come into the scene, offering differentiation on anything – from features, design, price and everything else in between.

Microsoft Devices Group has one goal in mind: to come up with technologically advanced products that are also something that you would want to have and proudly show off to the world.  Not only do their products have to be beautiful and technically superior, these also have to be functional: helping people do more while enjoying great experiences with their devices.

It is an interesting time for Microsoft.  With increased competition, the company needs to have that phone that would surpass all of its previous releases.  And design is one of the most crucial factors.

Being a multinational corporation, Microsoft has design talents in different parts of the world, and they needed to simplify the way they designed and developed their devices.  This involved changes to their process and organization on a global scale as they had people in different countries that needed to share ideas and work on these ideas.

At that point, Microsoft Devices Group was using third-party applications that they have to heavily customize to fit their needs.  As a result, they were incurring huge costs to maintain the software.  The company realized that they needed to standardize the installation of software at all their developmental sites in order to achieve the following:

  1. to make sure that they have shorter design cycle times for their products,
  2. to enable every stakeholder to access updated and accurate information about these products and
  3. to make their manufacturing and R&D units more efficient.

In the case of Microsoft Devices Group, they are able to leverage the Smarter, Faster, Lighter Industry Solution Experience and the HT body Industry Solution Experience to meet their needs.

 Easy design navigation and review with the 3DEXPERIENCE platformConcurrent Hardware Design with Smarter Faster Lighter solution

 

 

 

 

 

Those solutions used by Microsoft Devices Group currently for their design processes are working so well that the company plans to include other stakeholders into the mix.  Rather than limiting it to the design, engineering, manufacturing and other teams, they are now thinking of letting suppliers and similarly interested key parties get access of the information available on these platforms.  This way, it will be easier to send and receive information back and forth, while also allowing these key stakeholders to participate in the design process.   This would help the company come up with phones and devices that fit with their own goal of helping their customers “do more”.

Find out how Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE® platform and its High Tech industry solutions helped companies like Microsoft Devices Group get a lead on their design process by downloading the case study  and the video now  or by visiting the High Tech Ressource Center.

CATIA 3DEXPERIENCE, the Winning Partner for the DUT Racing Team

By Thierry

Dutch university students from TU Delft had only nine months to design and build a new version of their electric car that they hoped would once again lead them to victory in the 2014 edition of the Formula Student competition.

The team used design and simulation technology from Dassault Systèmes’  3DEXPERIENCE platform to design the DUT14, an electric car featuring numerous improvements over last year’s model.

Global Design Competition

Every year, some of the world’s brightest engineering students pool their talents to design what they hope will be the winning car in the annual Formula Student competition. It is an opportunity for 500 teams from all over the world to put their skills and imaginations to work during their free time, including evenings, weekends and holidays, for a good portion of the school year. In addition to the challenge, it is a tribute to the engineers who founded this competition over 30 years ago. “This international design competition was the idea of the Society of Automotive Engineers who thought that students graduating from engineering school did not have sufficient practical design experience, nor the right project management and team-working skills,” explained Tim de Morée, team leader, Formula Student team at TU Delft in the Netherlands. “So they designed the Formula Student competition to enable them to acquire all three.” Students must design, build, test and drive a formula-type racing car as well as create an associated business plan for potential investors. Contestants’ entries are judged based on a series of tests that include speed, design, safety, reliability, and cost.

Delft University of Technology is a repeat participant in this competition and winner of numerous Formula Student races in the past.

Tim de Morée is this year’s leader of TU Delft’s 86 students team. Once again the students attempted to outperform the other teams in three key races – Formula Student United Kingdom (FSUK), Formula Student Germany (FSG) and Formula Student Austria (FSA) – with their new and improved DUT14. “You may think that after designing 13 cars that we benefit from our past experiences and know-how,” de Morée said. “This is not entirely true since 80% of the team is new to this competition. The other 20% are the few alumni who participated in this year’s adventure providing us with their design and project management expertise.” As a result, de Morée’s team completely redesigned a vehicle from scratch. The four-wheel drive car has four equal motors that enable the car to accelerate even faster and to regenerate energy on all wheels while braking. “This constant reuse of energy allowed us to choose a much smaller and lighter battery package,” de Morée said.

Engineering Firm.com

The team is run like a small engineering company with students working in one of five departments: electronics, powertrain, vehicle dynamics, chassis and aerodynamics. “Team members are responsible for designing a part, for example the steering system or electrical wire harness. Only the most standard parts such as dampers or sensors were purchased from suppliers but we tried to do as much as we could by ourselves.”

The DUT14 was designed and tested using solutions from the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Every “department” completed its objectives using the 3DEXPERIENCE solutions. For example, students used CATIA for their design work and the analysis and simulation solution SIMULIA to test their design concepts. “This was very beneficial due to our tight schedule and limited resources,” Marinus van des Meijs, chief engineer, said. “We had only nine months to complete the project, of which three were dedicated to design.”

Lighter, More Energy Efficient

One of the team’s objectives this year was to make the car lighter than last year. “With a lighter car we improve energy efficiency and performance when accelerating or braking,” van des Meijs explained. “The DUT14 weighed 155 kg, down from last year’s model, which weighed an already light 179 kg. We owe this success in part to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and its integrated simulation solutions, which enabled us to test each design iteration with amazing speed and precision. “All five departments of our company shared the same designs so when one group made changes, the others saw the updated design in real-time,” van des Meijs said. “Moreover, design history was capitalized, which allowed us to go back to previous design versions if needed at the push of a button.

Most of all, potential design problems were detected early on and not when we were physically assembling the car, which would have hurt our timing.”

Also new this year were the tires for the DUT14. “We designed them ourselves this time and made them wider, with a smaller outer radius and lighter than last year,” van des Meijs said. “We believed it would improve performance. Here again, without the 3DEXPERIENCE platform we would not have been able to test if our design caused interferences when steering. We were able to look at 55 different design iterations with CATIA before finding the right configuration.

The electrical department used the CATIA Electrical solution to define the wire layout, splice positions and wire lengths. “CATIA helped us to position our wiring in the most efficient way while keeping total mass on par with last year’s model,” van des Meijs said. “It is also important to allow slack where the connectors are and not in the rest of the wire harness. CATIA helped us place them exactly where we wanted. One key value of CATIA Electrical is its ability to quickly produce a precise design for routing. We used the Flattening feature to create the wiring drawings at a scale of 1:1. This made it easier to visualize every detail, which was very helpful,” he said.

CATIA, a Winning Partner

The Society of Automotive Engineers would have been proud to see how the design competition they imagined provides participants with valuable engineering skills. The TU Delft team put these skills to good use winning the championship title at the Silverstone competition and receiving numerous awards at the Hockenheim race in Germany including the Audi ultra-award for best lightweight concept. “It was a heart-stopping few days of ups and downs but we did it,” de Morée exclaimed.

With CATIA we had confidence in our design and in our ability to come up with the best vehicle possible in a very short timeframe.”

Discover the full story in video on 3ds.com

CATIA, the Winning Partner for the DUT Racing team

Designing for the Medical Device Industry: Holistic Solutions

By Helene

This post originally appeared at Core77.

A Multi-Faceted Approach

Bringing a consumer product to market is a challenge in and of itself—taking an idea through concept development, business analysis, beta testing, product launch, and beyond. Add the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) to the mix, and it’s a whole ‘nother story. This is the challenge faced by medical device and product firms, which not only have to make a fully functioning, well-designed product but also have to put it through several rounds of rigorous testing by the FDA and other regulatory bodies.

The AliveCor heart monitor, designed by Karten Design.

“They’re parameters. They don’t stop you from doing anything, but they do make you do it in a way that you, as a user, would probably think is a good thing,” says Aidan Petrie, Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Ximedica,

an FDA-registered product development firm with an exclusive focus on medical products. On any given day, Ximedica is running 40 individual programs, overseeing the steps required to bring these products to market. “We don’t do anything that isn’t a FDA-regulated product,” says Petrie.

The timelines for these projects can run anywhere between two to six years. While time-to-market is not the primary driver, finding ways to close that gap can make a big difference in profitability. For companies like Ximedica and HS Design, closing that gap meant becoming International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 13485 certified. “There are so many regulatory and quality metrics that had to be put in place to satisfy those requirements that it made us a better and stronger company,” explains Tor Alden, Principal and CEO at HS Design (HSD). “It also put us to a level where we couldn’t just accept any client. We had to become more sophisticated as far as who our clients were and how we could say no or reach a point of compliancy.” By building those regulations into the design process, these companies are able to anticipate and plan for any potential timely obstacles from the get-go.

As the products become increasingly complex, so do the regulations around how they’re developed. Traceability of every decision is required for ISO and FDA compliance, ensuring that medical device firms have a standardized quality management process that they follow and document every step of the product’s development. Depending on the type of product, specialists are often brought in to advise different aspects of that process. “There are so many parts to the puzzle,” says Petrie. “We have a hundred and forty people, but we still need specialists all over the place. We have regulatory people on staff, but we also bring in other pieces that we need. While all the people we have in the building are experts in medical device development, when we need someone to develop some optics, we go outside for that. It’s very collaborative because nobody can do it all by themselves.”

As an FDA-registered developer and contract manufacturer, Ximedica takes products all the way through to clinical trials—a part of the process that comes with its own set of requirements all its own. Even a product as benign as a toothbrush, for example, calls for regulations under HIPPA (Health Insurance Privacy and Accountability Act) if it is being tested by people over the age of 65, under 18, or those living with certain medical conditions. Being able to connect these requisitions to product features in the beginning would allow a project manager to track deliverables and foresee any hurdles before the final design goes to Verification and Validation.

Concept design of a smartwatch

Companies like Dassault Systèmes hope to offer a holistic approach to these problems. Similar to how Ximedica has positioned themselves as the one-stop-shop for all of the components needed to bring a medical product to market, Dassault Systèmes’ Ideation & Concept Design for Medical Device creates a space for designers, marketers, specialists, and collaborators to bring an idea through all the phases of the design process. Powered by their 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, Ideation & Concept Design for Medical Device brings together automated market listening, 3D-drawing to 3D-design integration, traceability, and project management together in one program—in the cloud.

“It’s very challenging to get a medical product to market in less than two years,” explains Alden. “A lot of it has to do with how challenging it is from the FDA standpoint and getting it through the regulatory bodies, but a lot of it is making sure that everybody is working with the same sheet music. Most important is to capture the user needs upfront and translate them into quantifiable attributes.  Additionally we need to combine these user needs with the technical issues into a product requirement specification.  Managing all these aspects of a project, understanding all the players, and the regulatory milestones is vital to shortening the time to market.”

Check out Beyond the design of the Medical Device to dig deeper into this topic and access the “Ideation & Concept Design for Medical Device” information kit here, over on Dassault Systèmes’ site: Ideation & concept design for medical device.



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