3DEXPERIENCE FORUM: AEC Industry Track Recap

By Akio
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AEC leaders gathered in Las Vegas this week to take part in the Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM, a unique event that explores innovation across a number of industries.

It was valuable to listen to real practices.”
– 3DXForum AEC track attendee 11/11/14

Collaborative Design and Industrialized Construction

The AEC track on the afternoon of November 11, 2014 inspired participants to take on industry challenges such as providing a high quality experience for tenants while completing under budgets, maintaining sustainability, improving project productivity and efficiency, and ensuring construction worker safety.

Attendees were also encouraged to envision the future of their firms by understanding how Owners, Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Product Manufacturers, and Fabricators can collaborate using the 3DEXPERIENCE platform in a cloud environment to achieve efficient, industrialized construction practices and BIM Level 3 adoptions.

In the opening session, speaker Marty Doscher (Vice President, Architecture, Engineering and Construction, Dassault Systèmes) discussed how 3D adoption has spread through the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry and that now is the time to evolve to BIM Level 3.

This session explained how 3DEXPERIENCE Business Solutions provides the new and innovative scheme of design and construction processes delivering Building Life Cycle Management.

Industrializing Construction: Industry Solutions Based on Best Practices from Manufacturing

Peter Terwilliger (Solution Experience Director, Architecture, Engineering and Construction, Dassault Systèmes) demonstrated Dassault Systèmes Industrialized Construction solutions, featuring project modeling applications built on the cloud-based, collaborative 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform interface is beautiful and looks like easy to use”
– 3DXForum AEC track attendee 11/11/14

The comprehensive project management and execution solutions leverage the power of 3D to efficiently and consistently cover construction project requirements end-to-end, from planning to fabrication.


Related Resources:

Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience

Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Process Experience


Advanced BIM Coordination and Delivery Practices

Speaker Becher Neme (Principal and Lead consultant of Neme Design Solution) led Advanced BIM Coordination and Delivery Practices, which outlined how Designers and Contractors can preserve design intent, lower risk, and improve efficiency during construction on complex project through the expert application of the latest 3D technologies.


Read more:

Spotlight on Becher Neme: BIM Expert Pushes a Zero-Change-Order Approach


From Concept to Fabrication, BIM Implementation Practices: Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Speaker Kerenza Harris of Morphosis Architects illustrated the application of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to enable new collaborative environments in her session, From Concept to Fabrication, BIM Implementation Practices: Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

The team at Morphosis continually seeks new ways to implement BIM technology, from early design development to final fabrication and shop drawings.

With a specific emphasis on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Harris spoke about the integration of Advanced Computation and BIM platforms into project workflow.


Read more:

Spotlight on Morphosis Architects’ Kerenza Harris: Teaching the Value of Parametrics from Concept to Fabrication


Parametric Tendencies and Design Agencies: Preparing For the AEC Industry Through Design Centric Collaboration and Performance

Dr. David Gerber (Assistant Professor of Architecture, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Southern California) presented the evolution of CATIA-based teaching, consulting, and research in his session, Parametric Tendencies and Design Agencies: Preparing For the AEC Industry Through Design Centric Collaboration and Performance.

This discussion highlighted the importance of bottom-up and top-down educational and research strategies, and linked these strategies to meeting the needs of AEC industry challenges and value propositions.


Read more: 

Spotlight on Dr. David Gerber: Building a Storied Career Around Easing Design Complexity


Mobility Services to Gain Quality of Life in 2030: the Modul’Air Experience

Stephan J. Clambaneva (Design Business Consultant Director, Design Studio, Dassault Systemes) presented Mobility Services to Gain Quality of Life in 2030: the Modul’Air Experience, a seminar on the power of 3DEXPERIENCE for future city development.

Modul’Air, a radical rethink of the mobility experience, is based on an innovative system of seamlessly connected pods transporting passengers and freight. These pods scale up and down according to volume patterns, and integrate with ground transportation modes.


Read more: 

Modul’Air: Design Thinking and Simulation Technology Help Redesign Public Transportation


Related Resources

Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Process Experience

Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction

Spotlight on Dr. David Gerber: Building a Storied Career Around Easing Design Complexity

By Akio
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Paradigms in Computing

“Paradigms in Computing: Making, Machines, and Models for Design Agency in Architecture”
by David Jason Gerber and Mariana Ibanez

Today Dr. David Gerber serves as assistant professor of Architecture and Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Southern California, but the title he claims is far simpler than his multi-disciplinary research aims.

The son of an engineer and a computer scientist, Gerber has called many countries (and at one point, a sailboat) home, and his work today reflects that blend of technological interests and global perspectives. A design architect by training, Gerber has worked for some of the world’s most innovative architecture and technology firms, including Gehry Technologies and Zaha Hadid Architects.

Since then he has served as professor, lecturer, author, and founder of several technology startups, but his work revolves around one theme: the intersection of architecture, design with computation, and technology.

Tweet: Building a Storied Career Around Easing #Design Complexity @Dassault3DS #BIM #AEC http://ctt.ec/1Tf11+Click to tweet: “Building a Storied Career
Around Easing #Design Complexity”

Finding A Better Way

It was during his time with Zaha Hadid Architects more than 14 years ago that Gerber says he discovered the lesson that would set his career trajectory.

That path, as he describes it, has been “to develop parametric skillsets, technologies, and knowledge to better equip designers to handle real-world complexity, while maintaining the highest level of quality in design possible.”

Gerber had won the title of project architect and manager for a massive new project: the One North master plan in Singapore. The design called for a 30-year master plan for a city of 200,000 people, with 5 million square meters of gross floor area over 200 hectares of land.

At that time, parametric design wasn’t a term ever heard in architecture, but the connection of information it allows was greatly needed by such a complex project.

“There weren’t any tools for me to appropriately manage my responsibilities, which was to link the data to my geometry while my geometry was changing on an hourly basis,” Gerber recalls. “And the data sets were enormous.”

Ultimately, Gerber developed a program that linked this information. However, he left the project thinking, “There has got to be a better way to enable good design, while not losing the bidirectional impact from geometry to data, and data to geometry.”

Exploring Parametrics

The Singapore master plan was a project with a painful lesson, learned under a tight schedule and cost constraints, among other challenges. Yet Gerber knew the tool he had commissioned while working on the project—what he calls the first parametric urbanism tool—was a first step toward smarter design.

 From Zaha Hadid Architects, Gerber went on to Harvard’s Graduate School of Design to pursue his doctorate. It was in a class taught by his advisor that Gerber discovered CATIA®.

It was among the first classes in which architects were instructed on CATIA, and it was eye-opening for Gerber to realize that there already existed technologies in engineering disciplines that he and his colleagues had tried to duplicate in the architectural setting.

“This became the 4-year trajectory of my PhD studies, in which I wrote one of the first PhDs in architecture on parametric design,” Gerber says.

His early experience in CATIA, through classes and work at MIT’s Media Lab where he was appointed as a research fellow, became an asset that helped Gerber earn an internship at Gehry Technologies, where he was able to further develop this knowledge for architecture.

Since then, through lectures, teaching and publications, Gerber has set out to help others realize the “better way” of delivering highly complex projects.

Removing Uncertainty

Gerber believes that parametric design tools and the shift to 3D design have become so valuable to designers because they help address the problem of uncertainty that is characteristic of design.

“As designers, we have a huge amount of responsibility because our visions carry with them 100- to 200-year lifespans and life cycle costs,” Gerber says.

Tweet: Our #AEC visions carry 100- to 200-year lifespans and life cycle costs @Dassault3DS #BIM http://ctt.ec/dawBd+Click to tweet: “Our #AEC visions carry
100-to 200-year lifespans and life cycle costs”

Given this duration, he sees design as inherent with enormous uncertainty. As a result, Gerber says, “It’s our duty to enhance the design process, and therefore the design product, with more and more intelligence.”

Parametric and generative design systems are one key for linking otherwise fragmented expertise in the AEC industry and applying it to accurately achieve the complex aims of today’s projects.

Parametric design mode, image courtesy of David Gerber

Image courtesy of David Gerber

Of course, there is room for more innovation in this new approach toward integrating project expertise. Gerber describes his world today as being about solving the problems that lie at the intersection of architecture, engineering and construction through an emphasis on the humanistic expression of design and integrating the innovations in the computer science field.

“My ultimate aim is to provide higher fidelity information, and capture higher fidelity knowledge to better equip the architect and designer,” Gerber says.

3DEXPERIENCE Forum 2014

David Gerber is a featured speaker along with Becher Neme and Kerenza Harris at the upcoming 3DEXPERIENCE Forum in Las Vegas, November 11-12, 2014.

Dr. Gerber will present the evolution of CATIA-based teaching, consulting, and research through the lens of 12 years of experience. The talk will highlight the importance of bottom-up and top-down educational and research strategies, and will link to the needs of AEC industry challenges.


Related Resources

Learn more about David Gerber’s work

Learn more about Façade Design for Fabrication

Register for the 3DEXPERIENCE Forum Las Vegas, November 11-12, 2014

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What Is BIM Level 3?

By Marty R
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The following is an excerpt from End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3: An Architecture, Engineering & Construction Industry Solution Based on Manufacturing Best Practices.

Download the full paper here.


Building Information Modeling (BIM) has been the Design & Construction industry’s answer to improve the flow of data through the building process, and, therefore, help to create efficiencies.

Industrialized practices work well when design information is structured appropriately for downstream application by builders, fabricators, and operators. BIM data standards have been gradually maturing to meet this purpose.

Building owners and operators are driving the industry to achieve higher levels of BIM maturity by demanding process improvements and technological innovations that reduce costs, increase value from suppliers, and increase sustainability.

Much of the industry is now moving from BIM Level 1 to Level 2, thanks in part to a directive by the U.K. government to adopt BIM practices by 2016.

An Updated Building Information Modeling (BIM) Maturity Model

From Computer-Aided Design to Building Lifecycle Management

BIM Maturity Model DASSAULT Building Lifecycle Management

Tweet: An updated #BIM Maturity Model: From CAD to BLM @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/7pz2C+Click to tweet: “An updated #BIM
Maturity Model: From CAD to BLM”

Some companies are trying to find efficiencies with BIM Level 2 processes, traditional workflows, and point solutions.

The industry innovators are rethinking collaboration and leveraging integrated BIM Level 3 technologies to become more competitive.

Construction teams that successfully adopt BIM Level 3 processes benefit from strategic advantages: they create less waste, deliver in less time, and produce a better outcome while retaining a healthy profit margin.

BIM Level 2 vs. Level 3

In 2013, the U.K. government mandated that all government projects utilize BIM Level 2 by 2016 in order to reduce information ambiguity. While BIM Level 2 has indeed brought significant benefits to architects, Level 2 tools tend to focus on design coordination problems, and do not maintain much of a role in construction processes.

Models produced using Level 2 point solutions are ultimately exported and imported into disconnected systems. This handoff can create unintended consequences: data silos, errors, version control problems, and rework.

Tweet: #BIM Level 2 still requires exporting data, creating data silos, errors, rework, etc. @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/MCe44+Click to tweet: “#BIM Level 2 still requires exporting
data, creating data silos, errors, rework, etc.”

Data produced by the design team at the beginning of the project does not flow seamlessly through to the rest of the project delivery.

Architects ultimately miss the opportunity to adjust for means and methods, lose control of their design intent, and are pulled into a reactive process of responding to Requests for Information (RFIs).

Under Level 2, with no integrated system to leverage BIM data, builders and suppliers are removed from fully collaborating on the model and are left to absorb the cost of rework.

BIM Level 3 is the only approach that fully connects the data chain from start to finish, helping to create end-to-end efficiencies.

In a Level 3 system, BIM data is not converted into files and emailed or sent via FTP sites to various parties. A Single Source of Truth is established, stored in a database on the cloud, and accessible by all project contributors through web services.

BIM Level 3 allows data to be transactable for construction, fabrication, and even facility management purposes, enabling open collaboration and building lifecycle management.

A robust Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) system creates an efficient environment for coordinating complex Architecture, Engineering & Construction data.

Adding BIM data to a PLM system creates a Building Lifecycle Management (BLM) system, which enables BIM Level 3.

BIM + PLM = BLM

Tweet: #BIM + PLM = BLM @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/ZOAd7+Click to tweet:
“#BIM + PLM = BLM”


Cover: END-TO-END COLLABORATION ENABLED BY BIM LEVEL 3 An Industry Approach Based on Best Practices from Manufacturing

Related Resources

Download the Dassault Systèmes whitepaper, “End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3: An Architecture, Engineering & Construction Industry Solution Based on Manufacturing Best Practices”



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