Integrated Project Delivery: What AEC Project Owners and Contributors Need to Know

By Akio
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UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay IPD Construction 01

UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay: An IPD success story. 
Image source: www.ucsfmissionbayhospitals.org

What is IPD?

Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a collaborative building delivery method.

IPD integrates diverse stakeholders—owners, engineers, architects, construction companies, contractors, and government agencies—to form a collaborative team under one contract. IPD also incorporates a variety of systems, practices, and business and financial structures. It is a joint venture approach, with shared risks and rewards.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “IPD is a joint venture approach
for #AEC with shared risks & rewards”

Successful IPD has been achieved through many different approaches, including design-assist, design-build, and public-private partnership.

The goal of IPD is faster delivery of a high-quality, cost-effective project.

Traditional Delivery

A project not utilizing IPD can be a fragmented process. In traditional project delivery, various project contributors typically don’t work together efficiently.

Often, teams are assembled on a “just-as-needed” basis. The process is linear and segregated, and information, including costs, is not shared.

Risk is individually managed, while compensation—or reward—is individually pursued.

The result is an overrun budget and schedule, yielding project outcomes below expectations.

Benefits of IPD

Conversely, a project utilizing IPD allows project team members to work together as a single, virtual company. In an IPD approach, key project stakeholders are assembled early in the process.

As a result, IPD leverages the experience, talent, and input of team members from the start.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “#IPD leverages the experience,
talent & input of team members from the start”

Information is openly shared, and decision-making is faster in regards to scheduling, budgeting, and materials. With the right IT infrastructure, IPD can help manage costs, safety, and field conflicts, resulting in reduced waste and increased productivity during a project life cycle.

Coordinated IPD phases, such as conceptualization and design, result in a more efficient—and potentially shorter—construction phase than traditional delivery. The project risk is shared. Compensation is based on collaboration and tied to the project’s overall success. Individual actors have the potential to profit more than under a traditional model.

The AEC industry is faced with global market challenges, such as efficiency, productivity, and high costs. IPD can solve industry challenges and achieve successful outcomes by enabling collaboration among project experts through all phases of design, fabrication, and construction.

Case Study: UCSF at Mission Bay

A recent example of a public works IPD success story is the $1.5-billion University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (UCSF) at Mission Bay in San Francisco, CA.

The collaborative project team comprised the owner, designers, the contractor, and 17 subcontractors. The design-build challenge called for integrating three separate hospitals along one common spine within an 878,000-square-foot structure.

Additional challenges included changing legislation, workflow practices, and technology over an 8-year life cycle.

Furthermore, 18 months after construction began, UCSF added cancer-treatment services to its design, requiring an additional 175,000 square feet. The team segregated out this revised area as a new project to control overall scheduling and budgeting.

Despite the revised design, the UCSF Medical Center was completed in June 2014, one week ahead of schedule, and had a $200-million reduction in budget from the initial estimate.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “IPD enabled @UCSFMBHospitals construction
to finish ahead of sched & $200M under budget”

UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay IPD Construction 03

UCSF Medical Center Mission Bay.
Image source:  www.ucsfmissionbayhospitals.org

Overcoming the Challenges of Adopting IPD

The complexity and size of a project, as well as differences in business models, will influence how willing stakeholders are in participating in the IPD process. The idea of sharing information, balancing financial risk, and being project-focused presents an enormous challenge for companies whose previous experience is based solely in a traditional delivery method.

To be successful, AEC companies will need to overcome a fear of change and be open to collaboration, transparency, and trust. Adopting IPD also has the perception of liability. A contractual agreement assigning risk to each party, however, will adjust participant liability.

Keys to IPD success include:

  • selecting the right project delivery strategy based on project size, complexity, and schedule
  • selecting the right team
  • choosing the right contract
  • establishing an effective compensation structure
  • and implementing an operating model aligned with processes and resources.

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“5 Keys to IPD Success”

Adhering to the core principles of IPD—mutual trust, shared risk and reward, and open communication—are crucial in achieving team integration and overall project success.

Finally, a common collaboration platform, integrated project management tools, and a 3D BIM system to enable the open exchange of data are essential to the successful implementation of an IPD approach. Cloud-based programs are particularly useful for tying together project contributors from all corners of the globe.

IPD Offers a Better Collaboration Framework

Collaboration among the owner, contractors, and design professionals is based on shared information and risk/reward. In the IPD method, the entire team is communicating and is on the same page throughout the project, enabled by collaborative technologies.

The outcomes are improved efficiency and productivity, higher-quality and cost-effective design and construction, faster delivery, reduced liability, and shared profits.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Integrated Project Delivery: What AEC
Project Owners and Contributors Need to Know”


Related Resources

Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience

Civil Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction Solutions from Dassault Systèmes


References: http://www.enr.com/articles/38058-health-care-best-project-ucsf-medical-center-at-mission-bay

 

3D Technology + Construction: A High-Value Partnership

By John S.
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World-leading, innovative technology is being used successfully to make the aerospace and other manufacturing industries more responsive to demand, dynamic in development and increasingly efficient in delivery. I would argue that the construction industry is crying out for this innovation to drive efficiency, generate sustainability, improve safety and reduce waste.

The techniques of Building Information Modeling (BIM), being applied in some areas of the industry, take us part-way but the full value has yet to be realized.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “The full value
of #BIM has yet to be realized”

The technology used by the aerospace industry embraces the full spectrum: from initial design, detailed 3D digital mock-ups, to testing and proving in the virtual digital world. The 3D model is reviewed, revised, redesigned and tested to destruction without injury or damage.

The same platform of collaborative data then tracks materials requirements and the manufacturing process, following the aircraft from assembly to sale and delivery. It integrates data across the lifecycle of the program, to generate efficiency, reduce cost, cut waste, increase sustainability, improve safety and create value.

Like an aircraft, a building is a system –  superstructure, foundations, air conditioning, useable spaces, arteries providing power, water, waste processing – a system for people.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Like an aircraft,
a building is a system for people”

The building becomes more than concrete, steel, glass, bricks and mortar – it becomes a space for living, working or leisure, an intelligent space connected to other intelligent spaces – an intelligent system – an intelligent community.

This building, this intelligent space, lends itself to digital design, 3D digital mock-up, review and revision in the virtual world and the ongoing provision of through-life management.

It is a complex logistical system which is simplified, made efficient, given value and given life through data integration and collaboration.

Guggenheim MuseumFrank Gehry gave life to the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao by approaching Dassault Systèmes to use its leading-edge technology from the aircraft industry to imagine and create the impossibly fluid lines of his building.

In the architect’s own words, this was transformational, and signaled a cultural change in modern architecture.

The building was completed on-time and well within budget, achieving financial savings of 18% in the process. That act would prove to be a game changer.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “The @MuseoGuggenheim was
completed on time with 18% financial savings”

The imaginative use of this technology has the potential to make buildings not only iconic and sympathetic with their place in the landscape, but to be intelligent, energy-efficient and sustainable. The manipulation of data enables the integration of retained, legacy buildings, harmonized sensitively with the new development to create places which are special; balancing the old with the new, seamlessly merging the ideas of yesterday with those of tomorrow.

This information provides the arteries which allow the dynamism of the construction provider to flow and the imagination of the client to be realized. It harnesses the desired outcomes of the client, the strength and capabilities of the construction industry, and the power of leading-edge technology, significantly improving the quality of sustainable construction and creating assets which are fit-for-purpose, environmentally sensitive and of lasting value.

Originally published: http://blogs.3ds.com/uk/3d-construction/

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Construction: a high-value partnership”


Related Resources:

AEC Industry Solutions from Dassault Systèmes

End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3 [WHITEPAPER]

How an Industrial Mindset Helps SHoP Speed Its Design Process

By Akio
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ArchiFuture 2015 is the largest and most influential BIM strategy and technology event in Japan. John Cerone, Director of Virtual Design & Construction at SHoP Architects, delivered a keynote address on Design Delivery to the ArchiFuture conference attendees on October 23, 2015 in Tokyo. The following is a summary of his presentation:

SHoP Architects ArchiFuture2015

John Cerone, Director of Virtual Design & Construction at SHoP Architects

Since moving its design process to the 3DExperience platform, New York-based architecture firm SHoP has adopted an “industrial” attitude toward buildings. The firm uses virtual design to “fabricate” buildings, much as the aerospace industry assembles airplanes using digital models.

“In architecture every building is different, and every detail is different, but our processes are very much the same,” explains John Cerone, director of virtual design and construction with SHoP Architects.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Every building is different but our processes
are very much the same” – John Cerone @SHoPArchitects

This approach requires a new design mentality, focusing on a high level of detail and a close working relationship with fabricators very early in the design process.

Moving to a parts mentality

The most significant difference in this industrial approach is shifting to a focus on individual pieces as well as the project as a whole.

Very early on in a project, the design team works in terms of individual components and systems.

“They may not be the final systems that will be fabricated — they’re more like placeholders — but the system is setup so that when we get the accurate information we can easily swap the parts in,” Cerone explains.

A project may have hundreds of thousands of parts, but virtual tools allow the firm to structure all of that component data and access it in context of the larger system. CATIA allows the designers to easily move from a view of the entire building into separate building systems as well as the individual part.

Individual components within the larger structure

On SHoP’s largest implementation of this technology, the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, SHoP learned to create templates for component types, then use CATIA language to expand those templates into distinct pieces.

As Cerone explains, “We’re beginning to think about design in terms of which parts are reusable and which parts are different.”

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “We’re thinking about #design in
terms of which parts are reusable, which are different”

In this case, a simple panel template containing all of the design, engineering and fabrication information was expanded into a handful of panel “families,” and then 12,000 unique panels.

Barclays Center: Installation of 12,000 unique panels

Barclays Center: Installation of 12,000 unique panels

The schedule component

With every aspect of a project living in the 3DExperience platform — not just geometry but also drawings, models, schedules and other details — something so abstract as the schedule itself can become a component that is attached to a design detail as a specific line item.

“That line item has a deliverable — the detail or a model of that detail is the deliverable and that can be attached to that schedule,” Cerone explains. “The schedule can be used in two ways: the linear time, but also as an object. The task that is associated with time is also a container for these deliverables.”

The result of this is a holistic view where time is always a factor, helping keep projects on schedule.

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Viewing the schedule as a “component” attached to a design detail can help keep projects on time

A world without drawings

Because all component information is generated in the model, SHoP prefers to communicates through fabrication plans when possible, rather than passing design drawings to fabricators.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Component info in model allows @SHoPArchitects
to communicate via fabrication plans, not drawings”

In the case of the Barclays Center, SHoP provided the panel fabricator with the machine code needed to cut each panel, as well as information on the install sequence to help plan which panels to cut and deliver first.

024

Fabricators receive machine codes needed to perform the cuts of specific pieces; no drawings need be exchanged

For both fabrication and installation, Cerone notes that the laser scan becomes a critical part of the design process.

“It’s essential that we know the conditions that we’re installing to so that we can find problem areas ahead of time, before units are installed,” he says. A laser scan will reveal when conditions are out of tolerance, and ensure an accurate fit for installed components.

An evolving process

In addition, the firm has found that as new virtual processes are explored on a given project, subsequent projects move much more rapidly.

For example, as the Barclays Center neared completion, SHoP began to apply the processes it had learned on that project to a project in Kenya. Despite working with a vastly different form, using a different technique, the firm was able to reduce the design time on its new project to a couple of months.

“This leaves more time to run analysis, and to be much more specific about what we’re designing,” Cerone says.

Subsequent projects have moved from design to fabrication in a matter of weeks, while retaining a high level of complexity.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “How an Industrial Mindset Helps
@SHoPArchitects Speed Its Design Process”

Related Resource: 

Façade Design for Fabrication: an Industry Solution Experience from Dassault Systèmes


 



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