3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea BIM Momentum

By Akio

 

Global adoption of BIM is proceeding with great momentum, and within Asia many are rapidly adopting BIM practices. Korea is one country leading the way with BIM adoption, with dramatic growth year over year.

Dassault Systèmes recently made speeches at two events focused on driving adoption of BIM in Korea. Building on the strong interest in the region, the company delivered these two talks on BIM.

Digital Tools for Sustainable Cities

Ingeborg Rocker, Vice President, GEOVIA 3DEXPERIENCity | Globe, Dassault Systèmes, presented “3DEXPERIENCITY” at buildSMART Forum 2015 Seoul, Korea on April 16.

With a soaring global population, vast numbers of people face living in cities that are decades or centuries old, built for much smaller populations with very different needs. This puts our environment at risk by wasting resources such as land, water, and energy, and makes cities harder to manage logistically.

A diverse range of disciplines are helping to solve these challenges, aided by a suite of digital tools. These tools allow scientists and city planners to see and explore the futures we are creating and their effects on their inhabitants and the planet as a whole.

Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCity | Geosphere project aims to create holistic, virtual models that enable urban planners to digitally study and test ideas. This will allow them to consider the impact urbanization has both within the invisible boundaries of their city.

This approach could lead to our reimagining of the entire discipline of architecture—With a focus not just on the resulting structure but also the impact a building will have on the entire planet and its resources.

Tweet: See how digital tools are leading to sustainable cities @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @3dsEXALEAD #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/0a43N+Click to tweet: “See how digital
tools are leading to sustainable cities”

 

BIM’s Evolution to Building Lifecycle Management

Dongkeun Jang, Business Experience Consultant, 3DS Value Solutions, Korea, delivered a speech at the buildSMART Forum 2015 on April 16 and the 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM Korea on April 29.

Dongkeun Jang, Business Experience Consultant, 3DS Value Solutions, Korea

Industrialization techniques have been commonly used in manufacturing industries for decades, and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) has also been widely utilized. Now the use of Industrialized Construction is expanding in the Architecture, Engineering & Construction industry to help improve planning, design, construction, and assembly.

The benefits of this include increased sustainability, optimized operations, lower costs, and greater safety.

Tweet: optimized operations + sustainability + lower costs + greater safety = Industrialized Construction @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/Yde6H+Click to tweet: “optimized operations + sustainability +
lower costs + greater safety = Industrialized Construction”

With the growing adoption of BIM, companies can further benefit by implementing a Building Lifecycle Management (BLM) system. BLM puts into practice a BIM Level 3 approach that enables a highly efficient extended collaboration model based on PLM and manufacturing industry best practices.

 

To set the stage for true BLM, intuitive 3D design helps owners and architects communicate to confirm design directions and articulate design intentions.

It also builds a bridge to construction partners. 4D Virtual construction planning enables VDC mangers to evaluate better resource assignment and plan more efficient construction sequences.

EXALEAD OnePart helps owners and facility managers access specific facility information, whenever they want. Dongkeun demonstrated how projects can be managed by the 3DEXERIENCE Platform:

  • Segregated work break-down structures articulate project configurations
  • Project members can access dashboards of the latest information and project status
  • All communication is shared, communicated and recorded through the 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform

Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE® platform applications can be part of an integrated extended collaboration process, bringing together all project design and delivery elements for more productive projects.

 

Tweet: #3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea #BIM Momentum @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @3dsEXALEAD #AEC http://ctt.ec/u4qi1+Click to tweet this article

 

Akio Moriwaki

Akio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes’ head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART.


Related Resources:

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction

End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3

Spotlight on 3-im: Bringing a World View of BIM to Italy

By Akio

 

Edmondo Occhipinti founder and Director of 3-im

In some ways Edmondo Occhipinti, founder and director of BIM consultancy 3-im, is starting from the ground up—again.

Occhipinti spent more than eight years with Gehry Technologies, working from his role as a consultant to ultimately manager of the company’s European and South American divisions.

During that time, he grew from an individual with strong technical knowledge of 3D technologies to a manager who taught others how to apply these tools.

Now, in his new role with 3-im, Occhipinti is teaching a whole new group of players how advanced modeling can solve some of the most complex challenges facing the AEC industry.

Tweet: @treiemme is teaching players how 3D modeling can solve the complex challenges facing the #AEC industry @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/UOVub+Click to tweet: “@treiemme is teaching players how 3D modeling
can solve the complex challenges facing the #AEC industry”

Tech-Created Challenges

Many of these challenges are created by the technology tools used most widely today.

For example, on the project management side, one of the greatest problems Occhipinti sees is the fragmentation among systems.

“Every single department is on its own system,” he explains. “There is no integration among planning, procurement, etc., and everything is spread out on a thousand different documents that are really not connected at all.”

This fragmentation leads to problems in communication, errors and emailed updates that are outdated almost before they are sent.

Then, there are issues of scalability.

Many façade contractors already are using 3D technologies. The challenge, however, is finding a scalable solution that allows them to grow their business beyond one scope. Products suitable for coordinating the sizing of 300,000 cladding panels haven’t always been able to handle the highly detailed engineering of smaller components — or smoothly interface among these details.

3-im, a Dassault Systèmes partner, has heard time and again the surprise of clients who realize a solution already exists that can improve coordination among trades and components.

A New 3D Market

That surprise often comes because the Italian industry is relatively new to 3D design possibilities.

The country is home to some of the strongest construction companies in the world, particularly in the field of infrastructure. Many of these players have branched out worldwide and have led to the rise of smaller supporting players.

The painful irony, however, is that many of these companies are struggling in the regional market, even as they grow internationally, due to the ongoing economic crisis inn which Italy is mired.

It’s within this unique contradiction that Italian contractors are beginning to ask about 3D technology. Occhipinti notes that as a result of these economic forces, Italy has been moving much slower than some of the Northern European countries into its use of technology tools.

“What we’re seeing is these companies that are now technically very strong, but technologically very weak,” Occhipinti says.

That is about to change.

A Partner in the Process

Because many of these contractors have offices around the world, these Italian companies are comparing their capabilities to joint venture partners that are prepared to bid on projects requiring 3D delivery.

This recognition is leading many regional projects to seek out partners such as 3-im.

“They are looking at partners in Italy and thinking ‘if I want to get more competitive abroad, where my main market is, I need to be able to compete with the others and bring myself to another level. How do I do that?’” Occhipinti has found.

It’s a question that 3-im is well suited to answer. The company is made up of Italians whose careers have been built on technologically complex projects entirely outside of Italy. Since arriving in Italy in 2013, the company has established work with several major contractors, and is setting out to wow the rest by way of example.

A Complex Example

Among those examples is 3-im’s current work with Morphosis Architects on the San Donato Milanese headquarters of Eni S.p.A., the Italian oil company with worldwide operations.

05.CDE_02 (1)

The 117 million EUR complex will feature three buildings covering 120,000 square meters. Each building will be connected by various platforms. The double-skin façade is designed with a level of geometric complexity that made 3D design a near necessity.

Tweet: The geometric complexity behind this €117M, 120K-sq-meter complex made 3D design a necessity @treiemme @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/3SL01+Click to tweet: “The geometric complexity behind this €117M,
120K-sq-meter complex made 3D design a necessity”

During its design development, Eni decided to implement a BIM process for the design allotment, construction documents and tendering process. “It was looking for a partner that had the experience to run this particular process,” Occhipinti said.

At the start of this project, 3-im found a partner in Dassault Systèmes, finding the company’s 3D technology the perfect product for defining the scale and complexity of the Eni project.

For nine months, 3-im experts have worked to build a dense 3D model for the project, bringing it to LOD 350, which not only represents the shapes and sizes of specific object, but also the interfaces among building systems.

05.CDE_01.000

Occhipinti explains that using 3D helped ease three key areas:

  • Coordination of systems: 3D allowed 3-im to model the work of the different trades that would be involved. Occhipinti notes that many basic 3D programs would not have been enough to handle this coordination — because of the changes that were happening on an almost daily basis.
  • Geometric complexity: The double-skin can be complex to fabricate on its own, but this one employs some fairly unique geometry. In addition, each entry is made up of a double-curvature glass reinforced concrete panel that will ultimately be carved one by one due to their individual designs.
  • Data structure: The model was structured so that all of the necessary materials and specifications, and all of their information and features, was included and could be effectively pulled out of the model as needed. This not only proved helpful with scheduling, but with cost control.

A Fresh Opportunity

Despite the challenges facing Italian design and construction companies, and their partners around the world, Occhipinti sees major opportunities.

“We are living in an extremely complex moment where the global economy is shifting from one phase to the next, and this shift is a great opportunity for every industry to think about itself and propose new ways of improving processes,” he says.

As he points out, the construction industry is infamous for its inefficiency, so at this point there are no wrong answers — except for maintaining the status quo.

“Things like this don’t happen quickly,” Occhipinti adds. “When I started in this industry more than ten years ago, people were saying ‘in five years BIM is going to be standard.’ Five years later we heard the same thing. Things take time to change — and that’s good for us. We have the time to bring new value to the market.”

 

Tweet: Spotlight on @Treiemme: Bringing a World View of #BIM to Italy @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/3alyT+

Click to tweet this article

 

Akio Moriwaki

Akio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes’ head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART.


Related Resources:

White paper: Technological Change Brought by BIM to Façade Design

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction 

Façade Design for Fabrication  Industry Solution Experience

The Case for Industrialization of the Construction Industry

By Akio

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

Like many other industries the construction industry is under constant pressure to improve productivity, reduce cost, and minimize waste in the operation.

While the productivity in the manufacturing industry has improved by four hundred percent (400%) over the last century, the construction industry’s productivity has, in the best case, stayed flat or turned negative.

Tweet: Problem: Over the last 100 yrs productivity in the #AEC industry has, in best case, stayed flat. Solution: http://ctt.ec/mf0SU+ @3DSAECClick to tweet: “Problem: over the 100 yrs productivity in the #AEC
industry has, in the best case, stayed flat. Solution: industrialization”

One main reason for the improvement of the manufacturing and other industries’ productivity is the “Industrialization” of those industries. Industrialization of any industry will rely on the following five factors:

  1. Management of Labor
  2. Management of work
  3. Lean Operations
  4. Modeling and Simulation
  5. Feedback from the source

The driver for establishing and applying industrialization in manufacturing was the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Currently no known association is leading this mission in the construction industry.

A marked result of the advancement in productivity of the manufacturing industry is the relative price of an automobile.  Whilst the cost of an automobile has gone from 140% in 1910 of the average national per capita income in the United States down to 33% in 2012, the cost of an average dwelling has gone up from 333% to 619% of per capita income during the same period.

Tweet: Since 1910 automobile production cost decreased 75%. The cost of a dwelling has doubled. Time to industrialize @3DSAEC http://ctt.ec/Urcfa+Click to tweet: “Since 1910 automobile production cost decreased
75%. Production cost of a dwelling has doubled. Time to industrialize”

This post is an excerpt from the white paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Dr. Heather Moore. Commissioned by Dassault Systemes and prepared by MCA Inc., this whitepaper focuses on industrialization of construction industry. It maps out the construction industry challenges, relates the history of industrialization in the manufacturing industry, and summarizes five critical aspects and approaches.

Download the whitepaper and start accelerating the “Industrialization of the Construction Industry” through lessons learned from manufacturing and other industries.

Tweet: The Case for Industrialization of the #Construction Industry @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/Uz_OK+Click to tweet this article

 

Akio MoriwakiAkio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes’ head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART

Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Download Lean Construction Solution Brief

White Paper: Industrialization of the Construction Industry

MCA® Website



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