What Is BIM Level 3?

By Akio

The following is an excerpt from End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3: An Architecture, Engineering & Construction Industry Solution Based on Manufacturing Best Practices.

Download the full paper here.


Building Information Modeling (BIM) has been the Design & Construction industry’s answer to improve the flow of data through the building process, and, therefore, help to create efficiencies.

Industrialized practices work well when design information is structured appropriately for downstream application by builders, fabricators, and operators. BIM data standards have been gradually maturing to meet this purpose.

Building owners and operators are driving the industry to achieve higher levels of BIM maturity by demanding process improvements and technological innovations that reduce costs, increase value from suppliers, and increase sustainability.

Much of the industry is now moving from BIM Level 1 to Level 2, thanks in part to a directive by the U.K. government to adopt BIM practices by 2016.

An Updated Building Information Modeling (BIM) Maturity Model

From Computer-Aided Design to Building Lifecycle Management

BIM Maturity Model, Updated

Tweet: An updated #BIM Maturity Model: From CAD to BLM @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/7pz2C+Click to tweet: “An updated #BIM
Maturity Model: From CAD to BLM”

Some companies are trying to find efficiencies with BIM Level 2 processes, traditional workflows, and point solutions.

The industry innovators are rethinking collaboration and leveraging integrated BIM Level 3 technologies to become more competitive.

Construction teams that successfully adopt BIM Level 3 processes benefit from strategic advantages: they create less waste, deliver in less time, and produce a better outcome while retaining a healthy profit margin.

BIM Level 2 vs. Level 3

In 2013, the U.K. government mandated that all government projects utilize BIM Level 2 by 2016 in order to reduce information ambiguity. While BIM Level 2 has indeed brought significant benefits to architects, Level 2 tools tend to focus on design coordination problems, and do not maintain much of a role in construction processes.

Models produced using Level 2 point solutions are ultimately exported and imported into disconnected systems. This handoff can create unintended consequences: data silos, errors, version control problems, and rework.

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data, creating data silos, errors, rework, etc.”

Data produced by the design team at the beginning of the project does not flow seamlessly through to the rest of the project delivery.

Architects ultimately miss the opportunity to adjust for means and methods, lose control of their design intent, and are pulled into a reactive process of responding to Requests for Information (RFIs).

Under Level 2, with no integrated system to leverage BIM data, builders and suppliers are removed from fully collaborating on the model and are left to absorb the cost of rework.

BIM Level 3 is the only approach that fully connects the data chain from start to finish, helping to create end-to-end efficiencies.

In a Level 3 system, BIM data is not converted into files and emailed or sent via FTP sites to various parties. A Single Source of Truth is established, stored in a database on the cloud, and accessible by all project contributors through web services.

BIM Level 3 allows data to be transactable for construction, fabrication, and even facility management purposes, enabling open collaboration and building lifecycle management.

A robust Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) system creates an efficient environment for coordinating complex Architecture, Engineering & Construction data.

Adding BIM data to a PLM system creates a Building Lifecycle Management (BLM) system, which enables BIM Level 3.

BIM + PLM = BLM

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“#BIM + PLM = BLM”


Cover: END-TO-END COLLABORATION ENABLED BY BIM LEVEL 3 An Industry Approach Based on Best Practices from Manufacturing

Related Resources

Download the Dassault Systèmes whitepaper, “End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3: An Architecture, Engineering & Construction Industry Solution Based on Manufacturing Best Practices”

Modul’Air: Design Thinking and Simulation Technology Help Redesign Public Transportation

By Akio

Tweet: The Future of #UrbanMobility: Pods, Cables, and In-Building Stations #AEC @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/VqLwR+

Click to tweet: “Designing a #Sustainable and
Painless Public Transportation System”

Modul’Air, a finalist for the prestigious International Design Excellence Awards (IDEA), offers a radical rethink of the urban mobility experience.

A central goal of the new public transportation system redesign was to harmonize human activity and nature in the French city of Grenoble.

The result is an innovative system of pods, transporting passengers and freight, which seamlessly connect, scale up and down according to volume patterns, and integrate with ground transportation modes.

The resulting passenger experience is extraordinarily painless and transparent—an obvious solution in hindsight. By design, Modul’Air lowers the barriers to utilizing public transportation and frees up ground space for a healthier environment and higher quality of life.

ModulAir-Experience-copy

redesigntransport

Eiffage’s Foresight Lab, Phosphore, and Dassault Systèmes Design Studio collaborated on the development of the Modul’Air experience.

In the process, Eiffage forged strategic partnerships with new business partners, in particular cable infrastructure builder POMA. Modul’Air project contributors leveraged the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform, which is now available on a cloud environment.

The Dassault Systèmes Design Studio provides holistic design innovation and implementation services for any industry. Design Studio partners become actors of innovation, bringing human understanding to the design process through advanced visualization, social collaboration, and decision-making applications.

3DEXPERIENCE Forum 2014

The Design Studio will be presenting alongside Kerenza Harris and Becher Neme at the upcoming 3DEXPERIENCE Forum in Las Vegas, November 11-12, 2014.

Learn more or register for this event.

Tweet: Designing a Sustainable and Painless Public Transportation System #AEC @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/2a0K6+

Click to tweet: “The Future of #UrbanMobility:
Pods, Cables, and In-Building Stations”

 


Related Resources:

International Design Excellence Awards

Industrialized and Collaborative Construction

3DEXPERIENCE Forum, Las Vegas, November 11-12

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Spotlight on Morphosis Architects’ Kerenza Harris: Teaching the Value of Parametrics from Concept to Fabrication

By Akio

Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas

 

Morphosis ArchitectsFounded in 1972, Morphosis took its name from the Greek word meaning “to form or be in formation.” While the name alludes to the firm’s “dynamic and evolving practice,” today it might also apply to its innovative use of parametric design tools.

Since joining the firm in 2008, Kerenza Harris has been a key part of Morphosis’ development and integration of these new technologies into design work.

Today, she is helping Morphosis to develop automation systems and parametric tools that can be integrated from the earliest concept design stages through fabrication.

Raising Expectations

Owners, fabricators, and contractors are expecting highly specific information earlier than ever. “It is a bit of a challenge because it forces us to have more complex models earlier on,” Harris notes.

Tweet:

Click to tweet: “Higher expectations from
owners require more complex models earlier”

In addition, some owners are beginning to expect highly sophisticated models as a baseline for design presentations. While Harris notes that modeling makes it easier than ever to show owners precisely how a project will work, it is creating new expectations about the designer-owner relationship.

Lost in Translation

Embedding such sophistication into models so early can also prove challenging later in the process—should the model need to translated into another format.

“Every time we need to communicate with someone, be it a contractor, fabricator or client, there has to be a phase of translation,” Harris explains.

When this translation occurs, there is always the risk that embedded information could be lost in the shuffle. By bringing contractors and consultants onto the same software and encouraging closer collaboration, such shuffles can be reduced.

The Intelligence of Parametric Design

Having detailed information from the earliest stages is the beauty of parametric design, Harris notes. Using one program from the first line creates an intelligent model with a history.

“We go from simple geometry; a line, a surface, a plane, a solid, to architecture; a room, a building, a door, a window. As we move forward, the window, for example, becomes embedded with additional information: it has a certain size and uniform specification,” Harris says. “As the idea becomes more cemented, it becomes architecture.”

Tweet: #ParametricDesign turns simple geometry into #architecture. @Dassault3DS @M0rphosis #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/4v3PB+

Click to tweet: “#ParametricDesign turns
simple geometry into #architecture.”

Along the way, models are imbued with an “intelligence” that can be linked to methods of fabrication, specific materials, assembly processes and so forth. This can prove especially valuable, Harris notes, when changes are necessary.

When information is imperfect or incomplete, it is possible to embed new information into the model without breaking down the entire system.

The Tools Make the Design

Tools such as CATIA have given Harris an edge in explaining the need for specificity to the students she taught in her former position at Texas Tech University, as well as in her lectures today.

Such software allows students to begin working with simple forms and shapes, and then develop those shapes into complex projects with specific materials and systems.

“We then have a model that has history, which allows us to add information without having to start over,” she points out. Having the right tools in the classroom also has helped Harris to emphasize the importance to students of moving from the “big idea” to the materiality of the future assembly.

“The idea has to be complete and you have to use these tools to develop it and make it a reality,” Harris says. She adds, “That’s how we’re able to have a lot of our projects built in the end: because we are very conscious of the materials and assemblies and reality of what these things are. If that can work with the big idea, that’s perfect for us.”

A Big Idea Realized

AIA seems to agree with Harris’ philosophy. Morphosis Architects won the AIA 2014 BIM Award in the categories of Stellar Architecture Using BIM and Delivery Process Innovation for its work on the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.

Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. Photo credit: Roland HalbePerot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. Photo credit: Roland Halbe

Morphosis used parametrics in creating the museum’s façade, which is comprised of pre-cast concrete modules that are repeated and reorganized to form a highly complex geometrical pattern.

The software enabled the team to achieve an effect that appears random and unpredictable, but in actuality emerges from a rationalized, pre-fabricated system allowing for a more efficient construction and installation process.

The AIA jury noted that the project stood out “by how it leveraged BIM not just in design but in the shop drawing process, and in the fabrication and installation they achieved things in a time that would have been unimaginable otherwise. BIM assisted in fabrication, documentation, and implementation. The submitter had a willingness to share their digital files to better improve the project.”

In its submission, the project team revealed that the museum’s success depended on this integrated process. The accuracy of the early design allowed the team to share highly detailed 3D models with the owner, fabricators, and contractors who used them to develop shop drawings and even a framework for installation.

The result: a world-class museum delivered on budget and ahead of schedule.

3DEXPERIENCE Forum 2014

Kerenza Harris is a featured speaker along with Becher Neme at the upcoming 3DEXPERIENCE Forum in Las Vegas, November 11-12, 2014.

Learn more or register for this event.

Tweet: The Value of #Parametrics: from Concept to #Fabrication @Dassault3DS @M0rphosis #AEC #BIM  http://ctt.ec/Qz4UC+Click to tweet this article

 


Related Resources

Morphosis Architects

Watch an 8-minute demo of the Dassault Systèmes Industry Solution Experience Façade Design for Fabrication

Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience

3DEXPERIENCE Forum Las Vegas, November 11-12, 2014

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