Intelligent Rainscreen Façade Video

By Akio
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Originally published on the Desktop Engineering blog. Written by Geoff Haines.

At Desktop Engineering, we aim to help our customers find ways of doing design or manufacturing quicker and of higher quality using software technologies.

Geoffrey M. Haines, Desktop Engineering

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

One of the approaches we can use is to use a rule based approach to capture knowledge to allow it to be re-used.

Rules are those simple set of instructions, something as simple as a cooking recipe, that one follows that determines an outcome. So it is with engineering. Capture those rules and then reuse them in software and then you have design automation.

We have done this with the design of Rainscreen Façades using the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

By taking the elements of a façade rainscreen, encapsulating the design process as a set of rules, we have created an Intelligent Rainscreen Façade solution.

We can vary any parameter within the rules to automatically recreate a complete assembly.

As every part in the assembly has an associated fabrication drawing, then those are automatically recreated too. Preset reports then create a full schedule of parts, cutting lists and cost information.

So when your architect decides on a different variation in grid or material, it’s simple to recreate a design, determine a cost, and create full fabrication details.

We have a short video demonstration to highlight this process:

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: Intelligent Rainscreen Façade Video @Desktop_Eng @3DSAEC #AEC #3DEXPERIENCE

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WHITEPAPER Technological Changes Brought by BIM to Façade Design

AEC and the Future of Design

By Akio
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Design In the Age of Experience

DESIGN IN THE AGE OF EXPERIENCE™ is happening April 4-5, 2017 in Milan. This gathering of members of the global design community is an exciting opportunity to exchange best practices and explore industry trends.

AEC professionals attending in person or following along online will benefit from the conversations and experiences we have planned.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: #AEC & the Future of Design:
Apr 4-5, 2017 | #3DEXPERIENCE https://ctt.ec/Te1nf+

Trends in Design

We will explore 4 major forces driving the evolution of design today:

Designing Experience

Virtual reality enables designers to model complex products, buildings, infrastructures or even cities within their own virtual environment, and experience them before they even exist.

Design is Tribes

Design is social and collaborative. We draw inspiration from the wealth of talent and creativity in the ecosystem, driving co-creation for identity-changing experiences.

Design is Science-Driven

Automation and generative design technologies mimic the beauty of nature to accelerate and sustain the innovation process.

Design is the Business Plan

Design affects the way consumers interact with products, giving rise to new business models in which modern ecosystems reinvent product purpose and a range of new applications.

AEC Session Content

Live sessions particularly geared toward urbanists and architects will include:

Mapping the Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna. (Day 1 Keynote Address)

Parag Khanna

clicktotweetTweet: Design In the Age of Experience, Milan 2017
feat. @paragkhanna #3DEXPERIENCE https://ctt.ec/Iu5nq+

Putting Science at the Heart of Design to Generate and Simulate Innovation, featuring SHoP’s John Cerone, Associate Principal and Director of Virtual Design & Construction. Algorithms, data-driven analysis, simulation: generative design technologies are playing key roles in creating products, systems and experiences for a more sustainable world. (Day 1 breakout session: Design is Science-Driven, 5:40 p.m.)

Designing Experience breakout session, featuring architect Toshiko Mori, IED Director Riccardo Balbo, and Hiroshi Kobayashi. (Day 2 breakout session: Designing Experience, 10:30 a.m.)

Designing the Construction Experience breakout session, featuring CadMakers CEO Javier Glatt. (Day 2 breakout session: Designing Experience, 11:30 a.m.)

Biomimicry and Generative Design Strategic Discussion, featuring Martin Tamke of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation, and Chief Designer Toshiko Meijio. (Day 2 breakout session: Design is Science-Driven, 1:35 p.m.)

Disrupting Business Models in the Construction Industry, featuring CadMakers CEO Javier Glatt (Day 2 breakout session: Design is the Business Plan, 4:00 p.m.)

Download the full agenda for Design In the Age of Experience 2017

AEC Design Hackathon

Meanwhile, an exclusive 36-hour AEC Hackathon—a collaborative session between CATIA R&D experts and participants representing some of the world’s most progressive architecture firms—will culminate in prizes for the best designs created with CATIA on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

The results of the Hackathon will be revealed on Day 2 at 9 a.m.


Learn more and register for: Design In the Age of Experience

Design in the Age of Experience 2017 floor plan

Related Resources

AEC Industry Solution Experiences on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform

SHoP Architects Customer Case Study

Leading Japanese Architect Foresees Computers Unleashing an Era of Design Freedom

By Akio
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clicktotweetClick to Tweet: Computers are unleashing an era
of #design freedom in #architecture -@KengoKuma

Kengo Kuma’s architectural designs range from the whimsical (Asakusa Cultural and Tourism Center, a wildly stacked pillar of houses) to the dramatic (the steamship-shaped Victoria and Albert Museum rising in Dundee, Scotland), to the deceptively simple (Great (Bamboo) Wall, a house in China).

Through them he has discovered his calling – celebrating natural materials and creating human connections – and learned that a computer can be an architect’s best friend.

China Academy of Art’s Folk Art Museum (Image © Eiichi Kano)

In the years after World War II, Japanese architects grappled with building homes and businesses to replace what the conflict had destroyed and accommodate booming post-war growth. Japan needed fast recovery as its top priority, and its “first generation” architects delivered.

Kengo Kuma, founder of Kengo Kuma & Associates (KKAA) and one of today’s most celebrated Japanese architects, reveres that generation.

“The first-generation architects basically had to reconstruct Japan, and that sense of responsibility had a big bearing on everything they did,” he said.

Kenzo Tange, who designed the Yoyogi National Gymnasium built for the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games, the building that inspired Kuma to become an architect, is a particular first-generation hero.

Thanks to Tange and those who came after – Arata Isozaki and Fumihiko Maki of the second generation, and Tadao Ando and Toyo Ito of the third generation – Kuma said he feels empowered to pursue a design freedom his predecessors never had.

“Japan’s a wealthy country now, rivaling the United States and Europe,” Kuma said in a wide-ranging interview. “For our generation, I’d say the main thematic question is what kind of architecture we can create in that context of comfort. I think this generation is trying to redefine architecture as a medium for people to connect with each other.”

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “#Architecture is a medium for
people to connect with each other” -@KengoKuma

REDISCOVERING NATURE WITH A COMPUTER

Soaring buildings with swooping curves and awe-inducing metal façades – the type of architecture that has dominated for nearly two decades – create a sense of wonder, but don’t promote human intimacy or comfort. Instead, Kuma believes that natural materials create the peace that humans instinctively crave.

His most iconic designs – beginning with his award-winning guest house in China known as “Great (Bamboo) Wall” – prominently feature wood and bamboo.

Even the stadium he designed for the 2020 Olympics in Japan – the first Olympic stadium built in his country since Tange’s 1964 project – is defined by its wooden details.

Ironically, however, Kuma’s transition from the concrete, steel and glass of the Industrial Age to the traditional, natural materials that define KKAA’s newest and most iconic projects has been enabled by the leading symbol of the modern age: the computer.

Celebrated Japanese architect Kengo Kuma (Image © K.K. Human Centrix)

“It’s really difficult to use natural materials, to be honest,” Kuma said. “There is so much variability. No two pieces are the same, first of all, and you always have to deal with each material’s size restrictions. The challenge is figuring out how to get all those pieces to fit together and create a functional structure, and that’s where computers are so helpful. It seems to me that you need computer technology to bring natural materials to architectural fruition. Otherwise, they are just too diverse and complicated to orchestrate.”

AUTOMATING THE ROUTINE RELEASES CREATIVITY

By managing many of the critical but routine and time-consuming tasks – from verifying structural integrity to compiling precise lists of materials to managing budgets – advanced computer technology, especially Building Information Management (BIM), actually frees architects to focus on creativity, Kuma said.

“Technological progress had had a big impact. We use CAD to design things in 3D now, for example. With computers, we can dream up virtually any architectural space and convert those ideas into actual drawings. As technology continues to liberate our imaginations, it’s cool how the digital advances in the architectural world have gone step-in-step with a renewed awareness of ‘the real thing.’”

Modern architects tend to spend most of their time finding solutions to engineering, scheduling and budget problems, not creating great designs, Kuma said.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: #Architects are spending time engineering/scheduling/
budgeting, not on creating great designs @KengoKuma @3DSAEC #BIM

“When you call on what BIM can do, it becomes possible to balance out engineering- type solutions with creativity. For example, people used to balance the budget at the end of the project to see whether the costs fell in line with the projections. Those days are now gone. Now you must have your budget in mind right out of the gates and work under those preconditions the whole time, gathering feedback and adjustments as you go. That’s why it’s almost impossible to manage your budget without BIM.

“Achieving a balance of solutions and creativity is one of the biggest issues in the architecture industry. If we can find a way to put these two things together, then I feel we can massively transform the architecture industry.”

DEMOCRATIZING DESIGN

While computers give architects more freedom, however, they also create an environment in which they will face more challenges to their authority, Kuma said.

“Computers democratize architecture,” he said.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Computers democratize
#architecture” -@KengoKuma @3DSAEC

“For example, someone who is a complete newcomer to architecture will be able to design their own house. Architects who have enjoyed privilege up to now may be opposed to this, but ultimately I think that architecture will belong to everyone. When that happens, I think we will be in for a very interesting future.”

In this new era, Kuma envisions architects being valued less for their engineering prowess and their ability to bring projects in on time and budget and more for their creativity and ability to create harmony, both in the buildings they design and in the working environments they create.

“If you try to make architecture more complicated, there is no end to how complicated it can get,” Kuma said.

“For that reason, I make sure to keep a model right in front of me. Everyone gathers around the model and talks. I feel that’s the key to not getting complicated. Everyone is actually very interested in architecture. So I think that if we keep things simple, a number of different people can take part in it.”

Sunny Hills Japan (Image © Daici Ano)

NURTURING AN OPEN, CREATIVE ENVIRONMENT

Part of keeping the working environment open involves avoiding hierarchical structures so that everyone’s ideas can be heard, Kuma said, even as KKAA expands beyond Japan with offices in China and Paris.

“I try to maintain a flat organizational structure,” Kuma said. “We want people to understand that they must take on a certain amount of risk when they assume responsibility for something, so we try to stay away from building too much of a hierarchy. That structure lulls you into thinking that someone else higher up on the ladder will always be there, ready to take responsibility for whatever you do. We want everyone to feel responsible for themselves and know that they are creators.”

In addition to encouraging a sense of responsibility, he encourages cultural diversity in KKAA’s staff.

“This diversity doesn’t dilute the character of KKAA; it strengthens it,” he said. “Our organization should be structured so that all of these people can really participate. That is what makes the identity of the organization stronger.”

Kuma’s philosophy is consistent with his definition of leadership.

“I think how qualified you are as a leader really depends on how easy of an environment you can create for everyone to speak up,” he said. “If you create an environment where everyone can easily speak their mind, different opinions will come forth and from those opinions you can find a balance. If nobody expresses their opinions, there’s really nothing you can do.”

A LONG-TERM VIEW

In a world that is rediscovering the beauty of natural materials and human connections, of sustainability and long-term value, Kuma believes that architects are well positioned to lead.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: #Architects can lead us into an era of human connections,
#sustainability & long-term value -@KengoKuma @3DSAEC

“The advantage the architecture industry has is that it can think over longer timespans, as much as 10 years from the start to the finish of project,” he said.

“We are entering an age that is going to be all about taking longer periods of time to think about what will make people happy, rather than shooting for short-term increases in profit.

“Architects are accustomed to listening to people about things. They are accustomed to thinking about things over long periods of time. Architects are people with universally applicable skills.”

Originally published in COMPASS: The 3DEXPERIENCE Magazine

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