How a leading Furniture company can implement design-for-cost strategies and launch products faster?

By Lauriane
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Nowy Styl Group is a European leader in comprehensive furniture solutions and the third largest manufacturer of office furniture in Europe. They have selected “My Product Portfolio”, a Dassault Systèmes industry solution experience, to design, develop and deliver more innovative products and accelerate new product introductions.

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“Dassault Systèmes’ industry solution experience helps our technical departments, personnel, partners and suppliers better communicate and monitor and detect issues early in the development process to optimize product quality. These capabilities reduce development and manufacturing time and costs and improve our time to market.” said Tomasz Bardzik, CTO Nowy Styl Group.

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To understand how Nowy Styl Group can implement design-for-cost strategies and launch products faster and in compliance with sustainability targets and safety norms, Watch the video and Listen to Tomasz Bardzik, CTO of Nowy Styl Group

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Read the Full Press Release

Watch the video and Listen to Tomasz Bardzik, CTO of Nowy Styl Group

Discover more about “My Product Portfolio” Industry Solution Experience

Find more about Dassault Systèmes’ in the Consumer Goods & Retail industry

 

3D Won’t Replace Traditional Fashion Design (It Will Make it Better)

By Lauriane
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dressmaking still life - pink measure tape, pins, thimble, shears on fabrics

There’s something about fashion apparel that inspires people. It is, perhaps, the oldest craft, art form, and profession in the world, evolving from the simple utility of animal skins to the modern, purpose-built, tech apparel of today. People are passionate about their clothes: the fit, the color, the style, and the way it compliments their form. And why not? There are so many aspects to enjoy about apparel. There is the coziness of fleece or the comfort of a tee-shirt. Fabrics that, because of the thread construction, shimmer like fluttering fall leaves. There is the bliss of finding those pants with the perfect fit that seem to effortlessly compliment the human form.

Apparel is a fundamentally physical experience, so how can we hope to improve the experience with the cold preciseness of digital technology?

black-and-white-modelHumans tend to be binary in nature: plus or minus, black or white, either/or. The reality is that there is so little in life that is totally clear cut. The truth is generally found all along the line between the extremes, and so it is with physical and digital fashion design. Fashion design is, and always will be, about how a physical garment looks and feels on the body. But the fact remains that there are certain things that are either difficult, or impossible, to do in the real world. Many of these things, however, can be extremely easy to accomplish in the digital domain.

For instance, when creating a physical garment, there is no way to instantly change its color, material, or shape. Further, it takes a massive amount of effort to rearrange a physical retail space in order to try different assortments, layouts, and fixtures. However, making these types of changes are nearly instantaneous in the digital world. And although the digital realm is very good about showing options and allowing you to make changes, it can tell you very little about how a garment feels and nothing about the quality of its construction. And it’s because of this last flaw in digital tools that many in the fashion world often throw these tools out completely.

But is there a middle ground? Is it possible to have the benefits of digital while retaining the authenticity of physical?

joshua-black-whiteMany industries have moved to the concept of the “virtual twin.” A virtual twin is a digital version of something that exists in the real world. This virtual twin often has many of the same attributes of its physical counterpart, such as size, weight, bendability, stretchiness, color, texture, etc. The idea behind this virtual twin is that different scenarios can be tested on the digital version far more quickly and efficiently than having to take the time to construct and test versions physically. This is done routinely in aerospace and automotive industries where real mechanical physics are applied to digital vehicles, which are flown or driven many times before a single physical part is ever created.

So, can this idea of a virtual twin be applied to apparel and fashion? Many companies now make the tools that allow fashion brands to create an apparel virtual twin in order to gain a great number of benefits.

Learn more about 3D in Consumer Goods, Fashion and Retail:

3D Design and Validation for CTO Products (eBook)

By Matthew
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Customizing products to customer requirements helps manufacturers differentiate and drive higher margins. Creating variants of a single, global product to meet local needs and preferences helps them get to market fast on a global scale. But offering multiple product variants in either of these scenarios creates a tremendous amount of complexity. This complexity results in overburdened engineers, slow quote response times, and costly mistakes. What if companies could take advantage of configured products without having to invest so much time and effort in designing custom-engineered orders?  Or put so much time and energy into creating a quote with a reasonable level of confidence? Or suffer from errors?

As discussed in the new eBook from Tech-Clarity‘s founder and President, Jim Brown, 3D Design and Validation for Configure-to-Order, there are ways to make life easier at order time.  The eBook shares best practices uncovered by Tech-Clarity’s research and practical experiences from GE Power’s Jeff Erno. The answer is to shift as much design and validation as possible “left,” or earlier in the product development process. This helps resolve a lot of the headaches that happen when quotes or orders require engineering effort to estimate costs, create designs, and prepare manufacturing documentation.

CTO-imageThe eBook discusses the value of a configure-to-order (CTO) approach. While there are many products that have to be produced using engineer-to-order (ETO) techniques, and many more that have some elements of ETO, companies that can move the bulk of the workload earlier in the process can create an advantage by responding more rapidly to customers. They also give themselves better insight into costs so they can develop more accurate, confident quotes.

CTO comes with its own complications, of course. One approach that companies use to configure products to order, for example, is creating multiple CAD assemblies in advance. Unfortunately, this is very time-consuming and makes incorporating changes a nightmare. Instead, companies can design across configurations using an approach called the “150% BOM” or “max case” design. This includes all possible combinations in a single CAD model. With the right ability to filter based on configuration options, this can help companies reduce design and validation complexity without having to create a library full of assemblies. Our research also suggests that using a modular design approach leads to better results, and makes this “shift left” easier.

CTO-J-BrownIn addition to designing in a configured context, there are other things manufacturers can do to reduce time and effort when it matters most – when the customer is waiting. Our research shows that rules-based design, design automation, and configurators help manufacturers achieve better financial performance. As the eBook concludes, “Using the right processes and 3D configuration technology, manufacturers can improve efficiency, streamline order processes, reduce errors, and develop accurate quotes much more quickly.”

CTO-J-ErnoManufacturers of “to order” products should investigate the ability to shift design left and leverage automation to streamline quotes, orders, and manufacturing.  While not all products are CTO candidates, and many will have “specials” that require engineering at order time, a shift left can result valuable quote and order performance improvements.

Read the eBook, 3D Design and Validation for Configure-to-Order to find out more about how manufacturers can leverage best practices and technology to improve CTO results.



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