How Will Automation Change the Job Market?

By Alyssa
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Since the 1970s, automation has eliminated the jobs of millions of bank tellers, retail cashiers, travel agents, airline front-desk workers and manufacturing employees.  As automation becomes more widespread across our world, more jobs such as truck drivers, airline pilots and even medical doctors are now at risk.

Business-FutureofWorkSince the Industrial Revolution began replacing workers with machines in the late 18th century, technology has been changing the nature of work. For every painful job loss, however, the economy generally created one or more new jobs in more advanced industries. Displaced workers had to retrain for the new jobs, but jobs still existed for those willing to learn new skills.

But with today’s cutting-edge technologies – artificial intelligence, robots, automated big data analysis, the Internet of Things, nanotechnology and 3D printing, among others – many experts believe the world is at an important inflection point that may change work so dramatically it will become virtually unrecognizable.

How many jobs are we poised to lose?  Is your job function at risk? What will be the impact on society?  To discover more, “The Future of Work” in the new issue of Dassault Systèmes Compass magazine.

 

JEC World 2016 and Dassault Systèmes: Composites Disruptive Technologies

By Yves
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JEC World 2016, the N°1 worldwide Composites Tradeshow which took place in Paris on March 8-10th, 2016 was an exciting opportunity for Dassault Systèmes to connect with Composites users and influencers across Industries.

Either visiting the 3DS booth or attending the Design in the Age of Experience conference cycle, they could discover the value that our 3DEXPERIENCE platform for Composites and Additive Manufacturing provide to their business:

Extend & Strengthen the Composites Value Chain

The 3DS Composites integrated solution is known to span across the entire spectrum of composites product development, from design to analysis and manufacturing on a single virtual platform, with Best-in-class Partner solutions complementing the process. This year, along with our partners Galorath Inc. on the booth and Convergent Inc. across the aisle, we demonstrated further strengthening and extension of this value chain.

Composites Thermal Assessment - CONVERGENT Inc

 Composites Thermal Assessment – (c) CONVERGENT Inc.

For early feasibility assessment at Conceptual Design stage, Galorath showcased a Cost Estimation solution called SEER for Composites, while Convergent Inc. delivered Composites Thermal Assessment in the hands of Designers for quick decision making. Downstream in the process, several Manufacturing Design solutions were proposed to ensure seamless interaction with Shopfloor Systems, including the new Laser Projection Operator role from Dassault Systemes, increased interaction with JETCAM for output to Nesting and Cutting Systems, and Coriolis integrated CATFiber for Automated Fiber Placement.

Laser Projection - DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Laser Projection – (c) DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Drive disruptive technologies for Clean Energy

In line with its mission as charter member of IACMI – Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation – Dassault Systemes is also committed to develop lower-cost, higher-speed, more efficient manufacturing processes for advanced composites.

Composites Thermo-Forming - DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Composites Thermo-Forming – (c) DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Dassault Systemes recently released a dedicated solution for Composites Braiding and showcased during the show the upcoming capabilities for Thermo-Forming. These both position Manufacturing Simulation at the heart of the Design process to provide enhanced Experiences about manufacturability, increased trade-off for design exploration and in fine, to help drive clean energy product development & manufacturing.

Composites Braiding - DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Composites Braiding – (c) DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Enable Industrial Adoption of Additive Manufacturing

We also received a huge interest for our new Additive Manufacturing solution. This integrated value stream from science-based functional generative Design to Manufacturing process and Simulation really aims at solving some of the key challenges slowing down the industrial use case adoption of 3D Printing.

We demonstrated that combining Modeling, Simulation and Optimization in the hands of a Designer, we can remove the traditional barriers and provide huge gains in productivity. And that with digital continuity, from Generative Programming to Manufacturing Simulation & Optimization, we allow to regain control over the Manufacturing process and reach expected quality and repeatability.

Functional Generative Design - DASSAULT SYSTEMES

Functional Generative Design – (c) DASSAULT SYSTEMES

At the heart of Innovation with Partners Ecosystem

As an acknowledgement of this thought leadership, Dassault Systemes received during the event the prestigious JEC World 2016 Innovation Award for its accomplishment on Large-Scale Composites Additive Manufacturing innovation with OAK Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Cincinnati Incorporated.

JEC World 2016 awarded DASSAULT SYSTEMES

JEC World 2016 awarded DASSAULT SYSTEMES 

ORNL, Cincinnati and DS developed a revolutionary platform called Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) which makes possible to 3D-Print large products like the Shelby Cobra in a few hours. Material is added 200 times more quickly than with existing systems and production costs can be cut by 95%.

JEC 2016 award to Dassault Systèmes

For those who missed us at JEC World 2016, you can still connect with Dassault Systemes on these Composites and Additive Manufacturing topics, amongst many more Experiences, during the DESIGN In The Age of Experience event on April 11th-12th, 2016 in Milan. And we will soon make the recording of our JEC conference cycle available on the 3DS Composites Community. Stay tuned …

Additive manufacturers lead a design revolution

By Catherine
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Written by Catherine Bolgar
3D printer

Additive manufacturing—industrial-strength 3D printing—is shaking up the world of industrial design.

The global market for additive manufacturing (AM) grew 35% in 2014, as companies increasingly find new ways to use the process. AM builds up objects layer by layer, as opposed to conventional, or subtractive, manufacturing methods, which cut or grind down a solid piece to the desired form.

As a result, AM is capable of producing new shapes that would have been difficult to create using conventional methods. It can also fashion new internal architecture that’s hollow or contains lattices, instead of being solid. This not only reduces the amount of material used, it also makes the end product lighter. And it allows us to rethink design.

Additive technology has opened up the door for us to conceive shapes and designs,” says Joshua Mook, engineering manager, additive technologies, at General Electric Aviation in Cincinnati. “Shapes are now free, complexity is free, so we can go satisfy the physics and the shapes in the way they want to be satisfied.”

Cooling devices, such as car radiators or laser cooling systems, can now be designed with interior channels that aren’t possible when using conventional manufacturing tools.

3D printer concept“Designers can take technologies that were mature before and now can add functionality,” says Matt Wraith, group leader, defense technologies engineering division, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. “A good designer is going to think about the manufacturing process when designing a part, but you have [far] fewer restrictions with additive. It’s a challenge for some technical staff, because they have to forget all the things they learned in the past.

The new mindset is leading designers to seek inspiration from nature rather than manmade structures.

“Historically we have handled problems like high loads by transferring some of the load to another member or out into the airplane,” Mr. Mook says. “All our solutions used to look like textbook solutions, with beams, right angles, things that are easy to cut.

In the future, ”they’re going to look more like bones in the human body,” he adds. “They’re not going to have constant cross-sections or predictable or recognizable shapes. They’re going to look much more freeform.”

AM is particularly suited to evolutionary structural optimization, a design idea from the 1990s based on removing non-load-bearing materials, allowing structures to be hollowed out as much as possible.

These new geometries can affect a material’s properties.

Engineer working on a 3D printer“In many cases, you go from molten to solid very quickly. That has negatives and positives. If you truly understand it you can use that to your advantage and generate materials that are stronger than in the past, like in a cast that solidifies very slowly. If you don’t understand it, it can lead to cracking and weakness,” Mr. Mook says. “Just as forging and casting are different, we treat AM materials differently from materials from other processes. We do extensive testing.”

Internal passageways also can alter a part’s performance. GE Aviation used AM to make a jet-engine fuel nozzle, which has many passageways for air, fuel and thermal isolation. “Fuel comes in ice-cold from the wing tanks,” Mr. Mook explains. “Inside the jet, it’s extremely hot. When you have extreme cold and extreme heat next to each other, it produces thermal stress. That has limited designs for a long time. Now, we can do a better job of getting fuel where we want it and air where we want it, and the parts can have longer lives.”

AM also offers the unique ability to change the density of a material within a single piece, though the technique is still at the research stage.

On a simpler level, AM is democratizing design. “You can reverse-engineer an item,” says Mr. Wraith of Livermore Lab.

If you have an existing part, you can just scan it. There’s no need to design it.”

Online databases contain open-source designs, while other designs can easily be bought.

“That’s the future,” Mr. Wraith says. “You download the design for a part and print it and you’re good to go.”

 

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe. For more from Catherine Bolgar, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion on LinkedIn.

Photos courtesy of iStock



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