Smart Facilities: The Next Generation of Sustainable Management and Operations

By Akio
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Sustainable Management and Operations #smartcities”

Rhomberg Group, Zumtobel Group, Bosch Software Innovations, Modcam AB, and Dassault Systèmes collaborated on a landmark smart office building project, in order to introduce more sustainable management of homes, commercial buildings and factories to smart cities of the future.

The pilot project at the LifeCycle Tower (LCT) ONE building in Dornbirn, Austria was presented during the 2016 Bosch ConnectedWorld event in Berlin, Germany.

The modern LCT ONE, owned by Rhomberg Group and equipped with a state-of-the-art Zumtobel lighting solution and smart controls system, is ideal to turn into an innovative connected building targeting the highest standards of sustainability and user comfort.

The LCT ONE project is the latest from 3DEXPERIENCE® City to virtually represent, extend and improve the real world and manage data, processes and people of sustainable cities.

This initiative addresses architecture, infrastructure, planning, resources and inhabitants so that stakeholders can virtually explore a city’s future and its effects on its citizens and the planet.

In this context, the 3DEXPERIENCE platform offers a unified virtual environment for design, simulation and seamless exchange of information between electronics, mechatronics and sensors of each system in smart objects, buildings or vehicles.

Real-time monitoring and analysis of Internet of Things (IoT) components and systems operations can help optimize the next generation of design.

In the LCT ONE project, the 3DEXPERIENCE platform provides real-time insights into the building’s usage and technical health to optimize energy efficiency and occupancy.

LCT ONE Außen © 2012 Norman A. Müller

LCT ONE Außen © 2012 Norman A. Müller

These include energy usage and savings per luminaire, per floor or for the entire building, 3D visualizations of presence data and a heat map that shows occupancy to help optimize usage.

Maintenance insights include luminaire failure notifications, operating hours and the usage history of the lighting system.

Knowledge about preferred lighting scenes helps optimize light settings and, as a result, increase end-user satisfaction.

“The IoT is evolving into the ‘Internet of Experiences,’ where devices are digitally connected to the physical world around them to become part of a living experience shaped by interactions among people, places and objects.

By cooperating with Bosch Software Innovations and other innovators in their respective industries, we can demonstrate how sensor information can be easily harnessed from any big data repository in real time and linked to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform’s realistic representation of a virtual environment.

In this case, the 3DEXPERIENCE building actually becomes the master reference for planning, simulating and operating the estate.

Sustainable cities can become a reality sooner than we think.”

— Monica Menghini, Executive Vice President,
Chief Strategy Officer, Dassault Systèmes

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sooner than we think” -@monicamenghini @Dassault3DS

For more information about the 3DEXPERIENCE City initiative, please visit:

http://www.3ds.com/stories/how-can-technology-shape-future/imagining-more-sustainable-city/

http://www.3dexperiencecity.com/

 


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Soon, artificial human organs may be used to personalize drug prescriptions

By Alyssa
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By: Quartz creative services

 

A team in Luxembourg has developed a machine that can mimic the physical and biological conditions inside your digestive system. Just add a pinch of your personal microbiome and watch how your body would react to certain foods or drugs. Is this the future of personalized medicine?

At a microscopic level, about 100 trillion bacteria live in and around your body, with a large proportion residing in your gut. The kind you find in yogurt and fermented tea, Lactobacillus acidophilus, is one of the most common, but there are hundreds of varieties. Each individual has a slightly different mixture of bacteria, and it’s known as your “microbiome.”

Medical research has begun to pay more attention to these gut flora since 2012, when the NIH, FDA, and DARPA began funding studies into machines which might explore the link between your microbiome and your risk for diseases like diabetes, obesity, IBD, and Crohn’s. Even some neurodegenerative diseases have been shown to have some link to your bacterial cocktail, and research suggests these critters have an effect on your everyday cognitive functions, too.

Until recently it has been impossible to actually use these gut flora outside the body—to simulate a real human reaction to a drug compound, for example. If put in just the right environment, such a simulation could help doctors predict an individual’s response to pharmaceuticals, foods, allergens, supplements, and environmental factors, opening up the promising possibility of creating personalized treatments that could drastically reduce the likelihood of disease, drug interactions, and costly post-hoc treatments.

The implications for drug personalization are particularly profound. According to the FDA, adverse drug reactions are the fourth largest cause of death in the United States, causing over 106,000 deaths annually. Stimulated human organs, such as a machine-based human gut, offer the opportunity to run predictive pharmaceutical tests on the efficacy and safety of various drug compounds. The findings from such tests could inform which drugs doctors choose to administer to patients and reduce the likelihood of drug interactions in individuals being treated for more than one condition.

 

What’s so hard about simulating a human organ?

“In the gut, you have really strict requirements in terms of the oxygen concentrations,” says Pranjul Shah, PhD and cofounder of Orgamime, the Luxembourg-based biotech startup whose gut-on-a-chip machine received wide acclaim in June 2016 following the publication of its white paper in the journal Nature.

The challenge, Shah says, is reproducing the exact bacterial habitat as it exists inside the intestines, a complex task. “Human cells need oxygen to survive and thrive, [but] the bacteria need to be in a steep, zero-oxygen environment,” says Shah. In the gut, two environments—aerobic and anaerobic—exist within a few microns of each other. It’s hard to build a machine from plastic and simulated mucous that can do the same thing. “This gradient is so steep that many other systems which have tried to do that have failed to achieve it,” he says.

Plus, the machine needs to reproduce the physical changes caused by food material passing by, an effect called “shear.” “The bacteria are used to some kind of shear in the gut because it’s a constantly pulsating environment,” says Shah.

 

Will gut-on-a-chip machines change what you choose to eat?

The food industry, rife with pseudoscience, will also be transformed. While machines like Orgamime’s can facilitate personalization of drug compounds, they could also be used to verify food manufacturers’ health claims, or definitively prove whether ingredients like high-fructose corn syrup are actually bad for humans.

“There have been a couple of papers which came out very, very recently that say that artificial sugars—not natural sugars, but artificial sugars—are really a big problem,” says Shah. The true link between high-fructose corn syrup, gut flora, and diabetes might be deduced using gut machines like Orgamime’s. Shah, whose family has a history of diabetes, has already stopped consuming high-fructose corn syrup. “If you get the Mexican Coca-Cola, it’s real sugar,” he says. “Even when I’m traveling in the US, if I have an option, I ask for the Mexican Coke.”

Also on trial will be yogurts, the health claims of which will have to be substantiated with data, Shah predicts. “We’re getting a lot of requests from companies which are selling off-the-shelf probiotics which claim to boost your memory or help you lose weight,” he says.

Straight-up bacteria might even become a food group, of sorts. Bacterial transplants, already shown to be effective for treating the GI tracts of immuno-suppressed individuals, might become commonplace for all patients after a surgery or bout of illness. Family members might lend you their strains, or doctors might mix up completely artificial cocktails as substitutes and test their effects in a machine. The point is, it will be highly customized to you.

“A most suitable donor could be chosen based on your genetic makeup, the current system of bacteria that you have, and your diet, your stress level, your lifestyle, and the environment that you live in,” says Shah.

 

How can we prove the gut-on-a-chip actually works?

Shah began working full time on his machine in 2011 alongside Orgamime’s cofounder Sivakumar Bactavatchalou. Though it began while Shah was a PhD student in life sciences, the project now incorporates recent advances in electrical engineering, IT, and 3D printing. It is comprised of eight computer-controlled bacteria chambers, each of which mimics a different segment of the human intestinal tract.

To prove their simulation was accurate, Shah and Bactavatchalou conducted two published clinical studies (one in Europe, one in South America) to see if they could predict human subjects’ reactions to probiotics. Patients were first endoscoped to take a sample of gut material, then given six weeks of probiotic therapy with a live culture known as Lactobacillus rhamnosus, or LGG, commonly found in yogurt.

In gut science, one marker of impact for a probiotic supplement is your body’s secretion of proteins called cytokines, which send signals to other cells. Whether or not these cytokines are pro-inflammatory—a sign the body is being attacked, and invoking an immune response to deal with the threat—can be assessed by looking at the RNA excreted by the cytokines.

When Shah tested his patients’ RNA secretions alongside the Orgamime simulated gut, the results were identical. “We took the same bacteria, same type of cells, same conditions—and we see exactly the same genes to be influenced in our system at the molecular level,” Shah says.

 

What this means for existing drugs

About 30 percent of new pharmaceuticals fail in human clinical trials despite promising animal tests, according to the NIH. Orgamime’s technology could call into question every compound discarded by drug companies over the past 50 years. Those compounds can now be re-assessed for usefulness as a result of the more accurate simulated-human testing that has become available. Anywhere from 300,000 to 500,000 discarded compounds could be re-tested.

“I expect every pharmaceutical industry will open up their closets to startups,” says Shah.

But first, the FDA must approve the validity of machines like Orgamime’s. The department has announced it will begin clinical trials sometime in 2017. “If something like this happens,” says Shah, “it’s going to be the biggest game changer in the field of medicine, at least in the drug testing and development, in the last 50 years.

 

To discuss this and other topics about the future of technology, finance, life sciences and more, join the Future Realities discussion on LinkedIn.

This article was produced by Quartz creative services and not by the Quartz editorial staff.

How virtual reality will dramatically redefine architecture

By Alyssa
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By: Quartz creative services

 

 

 

As we construct future buildings, we will start to see more mingling between architecture and virtual reality.

Imagine you’re a hotelier. Your newest property—let’s call it a high-end resort in the south of France—has gone into construction, but is not yet fully designed. Your firm is based in New York. The old way of designing the property would have involved several transatlantic flights and PDFs sent between you, the architecture firm, your marketing team, and any other stakeholders. Choosing the layout of the hotel rooms, making furniture selections, even just picking out materials and a color scheme, “can be a long and expensive process,” says Benoît Pagotto, a co-founder of IVR Nation.

IVR Nation is one of a few companies championing a new approach to making these kinds of architectural decisions. In the new way, clients need not fly back and forth. They simply strap on a virtual reality headset and “step into” a digital version of their new property. Once the client is there—virtually, at least—she has a spatial understanding of how a furniture layout feels, or how a floorboard material meshes with the textiles chosen for bedding. Without leaving the VR experience, the client can make changes and collaborate with her partners in real time. What once took weeks can now happen in an afternoon. “It’s a real game changer for what the architecture industry has been doing,” Pagotto says.

VR is a place
Architects have come a long way from drafting plans on big sheets of royal blue paper with dotted white lines. The analog blueprint is, by now, practically a cartoon of an architectural rendering—but for years, they’ve still lacked the tools to bring their work into the third dimension. Most architects today will use CAD software to create computer-rendered mockups of a physical space. Some will even augment them by 3D scanning a property and feeding that data into the rendering. One particularly advanced design method is called building information modeling; with BIM, architects use meta-data about projects to create interactive, digital prototypes of buildings. This allows for a new degree of precision and efficiency during the design process. But even in sophisticated BIM and CAD programs, architects and clients can only see abstracted versions of a project.

This makes architecture a particularly fitting application for VR. Technologists, filmmakers, and designers are still making sense of exactly how VR will fit into mainstream culture, but in its simplest form, VR is a place. So, too, is architecture. Pagotto and his IVR Nation co-founder, Olivier Demangel, recognized this a couple years ago and launched their studio in January 2015. Pagotto comes from the world of luxury retail design; Demangel is a veteran of the video game world. The combination is important: IVR Nation provides a service-for-hire for developers and designers, and the experience needs to simulate materials, finishes, and colors to work. To do that, IVR Nation treats 3D models a bit like video game design. Pagotto and Demangel take information from clients—either an existing 3D model or one they create from scratch based on the architect’s plan—and build the experience in Unreal Engine, a game design platform Pagotto says they chose “because it’s the most advanced in terms of photorealism.”

Hardware for our architects of the future
IVR Nation uses the Vive headset to show clients spatial renderings. Pagotto says they chose the Vive over, say, the Oculus Rift, because the Vive can track your body’s position (so if you lie down in the real world, you’ll also lie down in the virtual world) and since it comes with dedicated controllers that help users control their experience, it cuts down on common VR side effects like motion sickness.

TruVision VR, another company working at the intersection of VR and architecture, also uses the Vive. It also offers clients experiences via the Samsung Gear VR or the Oculus Rift. This is partly because TruVision has a wider sliding scale for its projects. Some clients come in at the very initial stage of design, while others come in to make some final nips and tucks, says Connor Handley-Collins, a co-founder and sales and marketing director of TruVision. Like Pagotto, Handley-Collins says these new models allow for clients to make design decisions more efficiently than in the past. That cuts down on mistakes, and therefore, costs. “For us, the biggest part of the design process is the ability to change the objects and colors in real time,” Handley-Collins says. “Before we may have looked at colors in 2D, and then you do them one way, and they’re stuck.” These efficiencies are particularly desirable for large-scale projects that will use one template to design many rooms, like micro-living units, hospitals, schools, and hotels.

Looking ahead, the ability to make these changes ahead of time will become even more powerful when they’re part of a larger, virtual decision-making process. This could include, for instance, construction worker training ahead of putting stakes in the ground. Dassault Systèmes’s Optimized Construction lets designers and builders create virtual animated scenarios that act out how to use equipment, or how to handle a given terrain. Once these become available, they’ll become part of a string of VR experiences that help buildings go up more efficiently.

Right now, the design-oriented VR experiences come as services created by third-party studios like IVR Nation and Tru Vision. But Pagotto says soon, it will be a standard offering. “In the coming years architecture firms will integrate this in-house,” he says. “You can put your headset on and look directly at what you modeled.” That may be happening already: global architecture firm Gensler just launched its Gensler VR app, which combines with the Microsoft HoloLens to start showing clients work created in-house. Gensler will use the new technology to do things like adjust office layouts to encourage collaboration, move indoor infrastructure to make spaces more pleasant, and reconsider the sightlines in arenas to give sports fans the best view possible. For smaller firms like IVR Nation and Tru Vision, that could signal opportunity for consulting, or acquisition. Either way, soon, Pagotto predicts, “The whole architecture world is going to be working in real time.”

 

To discuss this and other topics about the future of technology, finance, life sciences and more, join the Future Realities discussion on LinkedIn.

This article was produced by Quartz creative services and not by the Quartz editorial staff.



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