The Cities of our Future

By Alyssa

Future city

It’s rush hour in the city. People make their way home after a hard day’s work. Driverless cars pass by as cyclists stream along purpose-built lanes, safe from motorized traffic and unpredictable pedestrians.

As the city unwinds into the evening, indoor sensors adjust the ambient temperature and turn lights on; televisions, radios and even baths are operated with a gesture from an armchair.

Outside, sensors monitor atmospheric irritants, ready to alert those at risk should dangerous levels be reached. A computer planning the city’s waste collection receives data about foul-smelling and full bins. Traffic systems constantly check and adjust, ensuring jams and accidents are a thing of the past. Unbeknown to its citizens, every function of the city is silently optimized to make life simple and efficient.

City jungle

This is a common vision imagined for smart cities of the future: efficient, responsive hubs consisting of vast, interconnected technological systems. But can and should technology alone have the power to tackle one the most acute challenges of our time: how a soaring population can live sustainably on Earth.

By 2050, the World Health Organization predicts that 70% of the population, or 6.4 billion people, will be urbanites. Many of these will live in cities that are decades or centuries old, built for vastly smaller populations with very different needs. As these new metropolises gestate and grow, they risk becoming sprawling, inefficient sinks, wasting precious resources such as land, water and energy, and becoming harder to manage logistically.

Now a diverse range of disciplines are stepping up to help solve these challenges, aided by a suite of digital tools that allow scientists and city planners, for example, to see and explore the futures we are creating and their effects on their inhabitants and the planet as a whole.

Ingeborg Rocker is one of those leading this charge.  As the head of the GEOVIA 3DEXPERIENCity project at Dassault Systèmes, which aims to create holistic, virtual models of cities, Rocker believes that to build for the future we need to take a new approach to designing our cities.

small planet

Traditional planning is built on the idea that efficiency is achieved by standardizing every element. Make every road, streetlight, junction and building the same and you drive down costs and make cities easier and quicker to build, expand and repair.   But, much like medicine has come round to the idea that no two humans are alike and therefore need personalized care, Rocker believes that no two cities can be considered the same. Instead, she says that cities need to be viewed and planned as living entities, where every element and every citizen is part of a whole. Changes – no matter how small – cannot be made without examining their impact on the entire organism and its environment.

Studies of the interaction between people and systems have revealed patterns that are anything but standard,” says Rocker, who is also an associate professor of architecture at Harvard University. “If we analyze the patterns and interactions between people and systems – such as transport and waste management – we can develop cities that are still robust while also being highly efficient and sustainable – but in new terms.”

This approach is at the cutting edge of architecture and could lead to a reimagining of the discipline, focused not just on the resulting structure but also the impact a building will have on the planet’s resources. New technology like that in the 3DEXPERIENCity project allow urban planners to digitally study and test ideas, empowering them to constantly consider the impact urbanization has not just within the invisible boundaries of their city, but also on the entire planet and its resources.

“Even the most remote regions of the Earth are affected by urban lifestyles. In the name of sustainability, we must seek new ways to limit the impact urban growth has on our entire geosphere,” says Rocker.

green wall

Discover more about new ways we can develop our cities!  The video below not only gives a glimpse into new technology that city planners can leverage, but tells an interesting story about a project MIT’s SENSEable City Lab ran to track the path and impact of trash across the US.

YouTube Preview Image

You can also read more about in an article that also looks at ideas like Hollywood’s role in envisioning the future.

NOTE: The video and article were first published as an Advertisement Feature on bbc.com running from 27th June 2014 to 5th September 2014, and was created by the BBC Advertising Commercial Production team in partnership with Dassault Systèmes.

How Our Demo at IMTS Will Shape How You View Machining

By NC

Hi, I’m NC Kishore, Senior Technical Specialist at DELMIA. This blog is the first of many Manufacturing posts that you’ll see from me on the topic of Machining.

Let me ask you this. When you think of machining, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Is it images of your high school shop teacher’s class or simply the stark environment where machine tools are cutting, shaping and drilling metals, plastics and more? Today’s modern machine shop can be, and is, so much more. We would like to show you why that is at the Dassault Systèmes booth at the upcoming International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS).

IMTS Machining

The 4th Industrial Revolution Has Started. See It At IMTS, Booth E-3125.

At the booth, you can expect to see a Single Source for Speed—an Industry Solution Experience for industrial equipment companies that need to manage their entire product development process – from idea to design, production and servicing – across all geographic locations. Our DELMIA representatives will be there to support this experience with our own DELMIA Machining demonstration.

We will be featuring the 3DEXPERIENCE for Machining. During our demo, find out why DELMIA Industrial Equipment Machining enables manufacturers to program, simulate and optimize machining processes through tight integration of tool path programming with machine tool simulation. Come see how NC programmers, for example, can identify and resolve errors in tool paths earlier and reduce programming lead times. With capabilities to capture and reuse best practice knowledge, NC programmers can program smarter and faster while maintaining the quality of the programs and precision on parts machined.

Does this sound like something you would like to see? Let me know in the comments below.

Just be sure to join us at IMTS 2014 September 8 – 13 at the McCormick Place in Chicago and stop by the Dassault Systèmes  Booth, #E-3125 for more information on DELMIA IE Machining.

If you would like to continue the technical conversation on machining, go where all the experts are. Join the conversation at the DELMIA Machining Community!

Facade Design and Fabrication: The Expensive Disconnection

By Patrick

Facade design

Most BIM (Building Information Modeling) technologies today disconnect the production of permit drawings from the processes for fabrication and installation. When owners include subcontractors in preconstruction services (as they often do with general contractors) they have the ability to coordinate these activities and reduce errors.

What is needed then is a data backbone to connect the building design to the fabrication detailing and installation sequences. It is common practice to have architects design a facade, independently from the manufacturer who fabricates the facade, and also independently from the general contractor and subcontractors who install the facade system.

Construction projects have included waste levels of more than 25%, and a major portion of that waste is related to the building envelope and facade. Waste consists of redundant document production, unused stored materials, idling workers, rework of installations, and other factors.

Tweet: A major portion of construction project waste is related to the building envelope and façade #LeanCon @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/3_aQU+

Tweet: “A major portion of construction project waste
is related to the building envelope and façade”

Owners and general contractors need to understand how much waste is connected to facade design engineering and planning processes.

New Contract Structure

The Design-Bid-Build relationship is the traditional contract model. Unfortunately, it makes it difficult for owners to drive project efficiency because of a lack of transparency in business processes and cost management systems.

In these circumstances, no one can take ownership of cost management over the entire life of a construction project. The Design-Build-Operate relationship is one answer to this issue.

In this form of agreement owners have the ability to coordinate the work of general contractors, subcontractors, building product manufacturers, operation and maintenance companies, and other stakeholders, in order to find a better way to deliver projects.

This approach makes building construction more like large scale product manufacturing, which historically has had much less waste.

Tweet: #LeanCon makes building construction more like large scale product manufacturing @Dassault http://ctt.ec/eu94e+

Tweet: “#LeanCon makes building construction
more like large scale product manufacturing”

Information Exchange Problems

When facade design engineers make fabrication documents, information exchange is a critical issue. If a building has a complex facade shape, it is important to seamlessly generate accurate 3D geometry and to produce specific 2D drawings for CNC cutting machines.

Current BIM software has limited capability to produce 3D geometry appropriate to fabrication. Therefore it makes sense for architects to access libraries of parts used by a manufacturer rather than creating similar information from scratch.

It is hard for facade design engineers to adapt to frequent design changes and reproduce facade production documents on the fly, unless they are directly connected to the architect’s model.

Installation Planning

Installation is, of course, an important perspective from which to improve productivity. If the unique types and shapes of facade panels grow in number and variety, it becomes increasingly difficult to manage onsite installation.

If delivery sequence and installation processes of panels are not managed well onsite, it is hard to understand which panels should be installed in which positions. This could result in a large waste of time and resources.

To compound this problem neither manufacturers nor architects include cranes, scaffolds, and other installation equipment in the documents. This third data source must also be included to optimize the delivery process.

In summary, we need new contracts, new processes, and new tools to address the massive amount of waste in building construction. The separate processes of design, fabrication detailing, and installation planning need to be combined into a single environment to properly understand costs and risks in building projects. A promising solution for such an environment is on the cloud.

Tweet: Façade Design and Fabrication: The Expensive Disconnection #LeanCon @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/wrjsU+

Click to Tweet this article.


Related Resources

Watch an 8-minute demo of Dassault Systèmes’ technology platform dedicated to Façade Design for Fabrication, Integrated Planning and Façade Detailing

Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience

Industrialized and Collaborative Construction

#CATIAcloud



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