Louis Vuitton’s Newest Landmark: The Jewel of the Bois De Boulogne

By Akio

The following is a reprint of a Compass: The 3DEXPERIENCE Magazine article by Dominique Fidel.

Louis Vuitton Foundation for Creation by Frank O. Gehry

In Fall 2014, the Louis Vuitton Foundation for Creation will spread its glass wings in the Bois de Boulogne in Paris. This epic project is guided by two overarching themes: the celebration of visual art and the creativity of meeting a unique technological challenge.

Louis Vuitton’s Newest Landmark: The Jewel of the Bois De Boulogne

by Dominique Fidel

A spaceship, a cloud, a crystal chrysalis: Observers have found many metaphors to describe the structure under construction for the Louis Vuitton Foundation for Creation, a new art museum that will open to the public in Fall 2014.

Born from a dream shared by architect Frank Gehry and Bernard Arnault, CEO of LVMH (Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy) and caretaker of the one of the world’s largest private art collections, this glittering glass gem is the new architectural jewel of western Paris.

The foundation, officially founded in 2006 after a 15-year strategy of cultural sponsorship, supports the commitment of Arnault and the LVMH group to contemporary art.

 

“Artistic creation has always been central to the Louis Vuitton fashion house,” said Christian Reyne, the foundation’s deputy director. “With this internationally recognized venue, we offer a great cultural breathing space in western Paris. The goal is to build more bridges connecting heritage, innovation, youth and tradition.”

The artistic programming of the “glass ship” remains secret for now, but its purpose is clear. The foundation will offer permanent collections and temporary exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, plus multidisciplinary events, debates and conferences.

The collection as a whole is known to be one of the world’s largest private art collections, and the opening will mark the first time that many of the pieces have been on public display.

Breaking With Tradition

For Gehry’s second structure in the French capital (after the American Center, in 1993), the Canadian-American master architect proposed a revolutionary project, breaking with the signature style he has developed throughout his career.

Here, visitors will find no shiny metal casing or deformed, powerful volumes. Despite its imposing proportions, the foundation’s new home has an airy silhouette that seems to fly above the Bois de Boulogne by sheer force of its glass wings.

This architectural sculpture will soon house 11 exhibition galleries, or “chapels,” in a flexible, modular convention space that can accommodate nearly 400 people.

With plenty of room for reception, entertainment, leisure and research areas, the building covers an area of 145,313 square feet (13,500 square meters) on two levels and is 150 feet (46 meters) high.

Only by observing the building up close can one appreciate its structural complexity. In effect, the foundation’s home consists of two structures overlapping one another.

In the center is the “Iceberg,” the functioning body of the building, made of reinforced concrete, steel and wood and covered with a façade of approximately 19,000 white concrete wafers.

Surrounding this mass is the glass superstructure, consisting of 12 cantilevered sails of curved glass with a wingspan of 98 feet (30 meters) each. The sails have a steel-and-wood frame covered in aluminum mesh, which in turn supports the 3,400 glass panels.

Louis Vuitton Foundation for Creation by Frank O. Gehry in the Bois de Boulogne

Ongoing Innovation

The design took 13 years of development.

“This is a one-of-a-kind creation – without a doubt, one of Frank Gehry’s wildest challenges,” Reyne said. “He made an initial sketch in 2001, after his first meeting with Bernard Arnault. Three years later, the Gehry Partners teams began working on the architectural model, and the following year LVMH commissioned the Paris office of the Studios Architecture agency to manage the project in France.”

Tweet: Tweet: “13 years in the making: Gehry’s wildest
challenge yet unveils this fall”

Studios Architecture Paris was a natural choice due to its past experience working with LVMH. “We already knew LVMH because we had done the interiors of two of their office buildings,” said James Cowey, the company’s CEO. “And we had worked with Gehry on the IAC building in New York. But we never imagined what challenges were in store for us, both art- and technology-wise.”

Renaud Farrenq, the engineer in charge of coordinating the project at Studios Architecture, lists some of the challenges the team faced: “Unpredictable curves and counter-curves in the central building, extremely demanding load calculations, bending plates of glass to the millimeter, identifying industrial partners capable of carrying out work that had never been done before, and fire and wind testing.”

A Unique Collaborative Environment

Given the complexity, the team had more than 800 people working simultaneously during the study phase, and then 750 workers at the peak of construction.

 

“In this kind of project, requiring ongoing technological innovation, seamless cooperation among everyone involved is crucial,” Reyne said. “In fact, we decided to put all the teams – architects, engineers and contractor – together in one place. In addition, we all relied on a single tool: 3D design software.”

The software, built by Gehry Technologies on top of a three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design solution developed for the aerospace industry, brings together the data from all the different trades – including construction, reinforced concrete, glass, plumbing, electrical, etc. – allowing everyone to work on the same digital model and to share information in real time.

“It was the first time that this software was used on a construction site in France,” Cowey said. “So we had to adapt it to French reality, especially to French law. But it’s clear that it played a key role in the success of a project that pushed the limits as much as possible.”

In 2012, its use of the software program earned the Louis Vuitton Foundation the BIM Excellence award, bestowed by the American Institute of Architects. Since then, the building has won several prestigious awards and is now studied in the architecture school’s curriculum at Harvard University.

A Pioneer in Eco-Friendly Building

In addition to its artistic and technological achievements, the Louis Vuitton Foundation building rose to many environmental challenges.

It aims to set examples in its use of geothermal energy, high-performance insulation, recycled and recyclable materials, passive cooling, rainwater harvesting, site management and more.

 

“With its environmental design, the project took on an ambitious sustainable profile, as demonstrated by its comprehensive HQE (High Environmental Quality) certification. The Foundation is also a pioneer in adapting the HQE standard to historic buildings,” said Renaud Farrenq, engineer in charge of the project for Studios Architecture Paris.

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Related Resources

Compass: The 3DEXPERIENCE Magazine

Louis Vuitton Foundation for Creation

Dassault Systemés’ Business Process “Design Optimization”

Gehry Technologies (GT) Digital Project

Does Infrastructure Still Matter with Solutions from Dassault Systèmes?

By Matt H.

On behalf of Kay Freund, IBM NA Ecosystem Marketing, kfreund@us.ibm.com

Multiple industries

Participating in the 3DEXPERIENCE Partner Forum (#3DXforum) in early July 2014 in Paris, I saw impressive new 3D EXPERIENCEs.  What great progress, making possible another set of business-level innovations that will require a very robust computing infrastructure to assure user interactivity.  This reinforced the importance of our IBM initiatives with Dassault Systemes to make sure that the necessary infrastructure will be there for V6 and 3DEXPERIENCE solutions!  IBM provides infrastructure of servers, storage and software, listed in the Dassault Systèmes supported operating environment, which can help you get started quickly and scale as your usage needs.

Total Cost of Acquisition (TCA)

 

Why does it matter?  This infrastructure can reduce the Total Cost of Acquisition (TCA) for Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE V6 with ENOVIA, V5 with ENOVIA or SIMULIA Abaqus software.     Let’s look at several examples:

 

Just there, the infrastructure for COE V6 Discovery Project

The COE V6 Discovery project helped a number of companies’ users to discover directly how to best get started with V6.   To allow this discovery, they used the IBM smarter infrastructure of POWER7 server with DB2 and WAS.  These smarter systems are tuned to improve the performance and efficiency of the Dassault Systèmes portfolio and reduce costs by using out of the box virtualization to improve resource usage, manage risk and speed implementation so that the users can focus on their “V6 discovery”.  We knew that we could just run the COE V6 Discovery project because similar systems are virtualized to support many customers’ development, test and production environments of V6 and/or V5.  POWER8 is available.

When should you decide to use DB2 and POWER for ENOVIA?

Each V6 implementation requires a relational database so just consider DB2 when lower cost and higher performance matter. DB2 advantages include lower total cost of acquisition, lower database maintenance costs, especially when virtualization and sub-capacity licensing are used, lower staff workloads and increase scalability.  In one way, I “just” need to pick one of the supported relational data base.  However, as I look at budget, I become motivated to see license and operational savings considerations.  Specifically, DB2 uses less memory, storage and computing time from adaptive compression and faster index performance. Reduced administration is because of DB2 automatic maintenance, storage optimization, faster backup, self-tuning and self healing. DB2 has better scale-out efficiency, superior system reliability and faster set up for high availability. Because ENOVIA is compute intensive and many customers have multiple environments (i.e. development, test, production), DB2 is needed on a subset of the cores so DB2 sub-capacity licensing can significantly reduce total cost of acquisition (TCA) compared to Oracle.  See the article with embedded videos here.

Starting and scaling with 3D simulation

Does it matter for the specialty simulation apps?   Oh yeah!  That’s why we did the IBM Application Ready Solution for Abaqus, a powerful technical computing solution that simplifies and accelerates the simulation environment. This solution, developed in partnership with Dassault Systèmes, provides the system, storage and pre-integrated cluster workload and High Performance Computing (HPC) cloud management software components. This solution helps you quickly and easily deploy, run, and manage a high performance Abaqus computing environment for simulation processes including pre-processing, solving, and post-processing.  See more here.

Like the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, the infrastructure is consistently innovating.  I hope the market opportunity will continue to bring these innovations together going forward!

  • Transforming your industry requires a cloud provider who has done the same.  See www.softlayer.com .
  • POWER8 and the OpenPower Foundation break open the innovation walls, including a partnership with NVIDIA.  POWER8 provides high level of performance, security and reliability with AIX exploiting decades of IBM technology innovation.  POWER8 processor and architecture handles bigger data demands in the cloud — delivering faster insights and an expanded Linux-based open server ecosystem.  See the IBM POWER8 announcement here and the OpenPower Foundation here.

 

Getting the right infrastructure is easier that ever.  To start or deliver faster, please contact Yves Gastellu at yves_gastellu@fr.ibm.com or see the website. 

 

Increasing Efficiency by Adopting Lean Construction Practices

By Akio

McGraw Hill Construction, the Lean Construction Institute, and Dassault Systèmes teamed up to produce an in-depth report on Lean Construction. Below is an excerpt from that report on increasing efficiency through better practices.

Construction team


Practices Adopted to Increase Efficiency

While taking a formal Lean approach is relatively new to the construction industry, many of the practices that are intended to increase efficiency have been adopted for a longer period of time.

Long before they considered themselves to be pursuing Lean, firms have been using frequent, regular meetings with workers onsite, prefabrication and optimization of crew sizes, and the data reveal that a large percentage of respondents have been employing these practices for more than three years.

Advanced practices to achieve efficiency used by contractors

Practices Undertaken for More Than Three Years by Most Respondents

The wider industry adoption of these three practices is also evident among the firms that have not implemented Lean.

1. Weekly or Daily Meetings with Workers: Site meetings used to bring efficiencies to the worker level may be associated with Lean, but firms seeking to improve safety practices rather than eliminate waste may also focus on frequent site meetings.

2. Prefabrication: The 2011 Prefabrication and Modularization SmartMarket Report revealed that 84% of the contractors included in that study used prefabrication or modularization.

This is roughly consistent with the findings of this report, with 80% of contractors using prefabrication.

Tweet:  8 out of 10 contractors are using #prefab http://ctt.ec/6e0U3+ @Dassault3DS #LeanConTweet: 8 out of 10 contractors
are using #prefab

Clearly, with such a high percentage of firms, this is not a practice associated solely with Lean.
However, as the Lean expert in-depth interviews reveal, many Lean firms find prefabrication to be an essential strategy to eliminate waste in their construction processes.

3. Optimization of Crew Sizes: It is not surprising that most contractors, especially those not familiar with any Lean practices, would feel that they optimize the size
 of their crews.
However, to truly gain efficiencies, there are clear advantages to gathering additional input from approaches such as pull planning and to rely on data rather than previous experience.
Firms implementing Lean may be more likely to make this distinction, which may explain why the highest percentage that report engaging in this practice are those unfamiliar with Lean.

One additional practice reported widely by firms that have not implemented any of the key Lean practices is training workers with preparatory tools and methods. While the percentage of Lean practitioners is slightly higher, the difference is not statistically significant. A larger percentage also report having used this approach for more than three years versus those that have been using it a shorter period of time.

Again, these kinds of preparations may not always be focused on eliminating waste, even if they help achieve that. Contractors may also prepare workers for safety reasons, and some firms with an advanced green/sustainable practice may also spend additional time preparing workers to handle green technologies for maximum impact on building performance.

The one practice that has a higher level of use among Lean practitioners that is statistically significant and that has also been in use for more than three years by a larger percentage of respondents is Just-In-Time material delivery. This finding suggests that this is one of the earlier Lean practices to be adopted in the industry.

Practices Adopted by More Respondents in the Last Three Years

Not surprisingly, the practices that have been adopted more recently—studies of worker ergonomics/activities and GPS tracking of materials, tools and equipment—are also those more reliant on effective data gathering.

Tweet: Studying worker activities and GPS tracking of tools/materials rely on effective data gathering @Dassault3DS #LeanCon http://ctt.ec/d54dc+Tweet: Studying worker activities & GPS tracking
of tools/materials relies on effective data gathering

The 2013 Information Mobility SmartMarket Report suggests that the ability to gather and analyze data from the construction site has been increasing with new tools and systems supporting those efforts, although it also reveals that better tools are still needed to support these efforts.

Studies of Worker Ergonomics/Activities

Analyzing data on worker ergonomics/activities can be a time-consuming, manual task without the right tools.
It can also be critical to find efficiencies at the worker level and to find new processes, as the the Lean experts in the in-depth interviews reveal.
This may explain why 50% of Lean practitioners report engaging in this activity, more than double the percentage of respondents that have not implemented Lean.

GPS Tracking of Materials, Tools and Equipment

The data suggests that this is still an emerging practice among Lean practitioners and non-practitioners alike.
Again, to use this information to find efficiencies, it is essential to be able to analyze this data, not just to gather it on individual projects.

Practices Not Undertaken by Respondents

It is noteworthy that, even among the Lean practitioners, none of the respondents report using 4D schedule modeling or 5D cost modeling.

The Lean experts interviewed in the in-depth interviews frequently mention the importance of BIM to implementing Lean at their firms. While a few of these experts do report doing 4D schedule modeling, the larger survey results reveal that this is still a highly limited practice.

Advanced practices to achieve efficiency used by contractors

Tweet: Increasing Efficiency By Adopting Better Practices http://ctt.ec/25xf5+ #LeanCon @Dassault3DS

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Download the full Lean Construction SmartMarket Report, with our compliments.

SmartMarket Report

Related Resources

Dassault Systéms’ Lean Construction 3DEXPERIENCE® Solution

Lean Construction Institute

McGraw Hill Construction



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