Watch the “Optimized Planning” Industry Process Experience at work for AEC Project Managers and Construction Planners [VIDEO]

By Akio
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JUST RELEASED: a 5-minute video illustrating just a few common use cases for Optimized Planning powered by the 3DEXPERIENCE platform from Dassault Systèmes.

Optimized Planning demo video

In this video, you will see how the Project Execution System helps a project manager resolve discrepancies between a construction plan and the actual execution plan.

The project manager manipulates a 3D view of the supply, status and delivery schedule of materials. He or she also uses Last Planner methodology to validate parts, materials, and contractor supply availability.

Two proposed construction plans are handed off to the construction planner, who evaluates the scenarios in a 4D environment.

Using the Assembly Evaluation application, the construction planner sees that key parts aren’t delivered on time. Also, there’s a problem with how a prefabricated staircase is supposed to be installed. The planner changes the EPC request to deliver staircase in 3 pieces, and updates the work package.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: #OptimizedPlanning use case:
foreseeing late delivery of key materials avoids onsite delays

Then, the construction planner uses the Resource Simulation application to see how forklifts and various types of cranes will move materials around the site. He or she is notified of a discrepancy in crane deployment: a crane is scheduled to be in use on two different tasks at the same time.

The Resource Balancing application helps resolve the clash, and the Auto Placement feature helps to best position the crane.

Finally, the general contractor takes the input from the project manager and construction planner, and creates a fully-optimized construction schedule.

Watch these scenarios and more play out.
(Registration required.)
Optimized Planning demo video

Optimized Planning is part of the Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience, powered by the 3DEXPERIENCE platform from Dassault Systèmes.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: [VIDEO] #OptimizedPlanning at work
for #AEC Project Managers & Construction Planners

Related Resources

Optimized Planning Industry  Process Experience

Optimized Construction Industry Solution Experience

Collaborative, Industrialized Construction Solutions from Dassault Systèmes

Calling in Sick

By Catherine
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Written by Catherine Bolgar


One day, your phone might detect that you have cancer and alert your doctor. It’s among the new diagnostics being developed to spot health problems faster.

Cancer cells, bacteria and certain non-infectious diseases give off volatile organic compounds which the blood eventually transports to our lungs to be expelled into the atmosphere, explains Hossam Haick, professor at Haifa’s Israel Institute of Technology. He is part of a team developing a handheld device with gold nanoparticle sensors that can detect volatile organic compounds in breath samples.

Each disease has a unique breath print, he says. The team’s sensors can detect 23 diseases, including cancers of the lung, breast, ovaries, head and neck, lung, stomach, kidney and prostate, as well as pulmonary hypertension, tuberculosis, and even Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

Cancer “exists in humans for five to 15 years before we start to see its effects,” Dr. Haick says.

If we want to detect cancer early, we have to do it when people feel good. That’s why we want to detect it by exhaling. It’s painless, so people will be willing to do it.”

Dr. Haick started with lung cancer in 2007. “If you detect lung cancer early, the survival rate is 70%,” he says. “If the cancer is at advanced stages, the survival rate is 9%-15%.”

Today, X-rays and computerized tomography scans detect tumors, but only a biopsy (i.e surgery) can determine if they are malignant—and 96% are not, Dr. Haick says. The sensors can distinguish between benign and malignant cancer, thus reducing the need for biopsies.
Dr. Haick hopes to produce a handheld device for around $800, affordable for clinical doctors. He’s also working with a European consortium to integrate the device into smart phones. “When we speak on the phone we exhale a lot of breath, and we can use that to monitor disease,” Dr. Haick says. The phone would alert the owner’s doctor, who would decide how to manage the results.

Similarly, a team at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is working on a noninvasive screening for several cancers simultaneously, by detecting DNA markers in a blood or stool sample.

While cancer lurks for years, infections can become serious in hours. On TV dramas, doctors examine samples under microscopes and find the solution in minutes. In reality, samples are sent to a lab where they are cultured—which can involve growing bacteria or viruses for six to 24 hours—or undergo polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a complex process that takes about six hours.

Emergency room patients with an infection can’t wait that long, so doctors immediately administer a range of antibiotics. But overuse of antibiotics has led to resistance, and in any case the drugs don’t work on viruses.

Jeong-Yeol Yoon, professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering and biomedical engineering at the University of Arizona in Tucson, has found “a whole new way of doing PCR” utilizing interfacial effects, that’s cheaper, easier and much faster—the whole process takes less than 10 minutes.

Normally, PCR identifies the pathogen by looking at the DNA in the sample. The DNA is first extracted and purified, which can take three or four hours. The amount of DNA is tiny, so it’s amplified by an enzyme and heated and cooled repeatedly. Each cycle doubles the DNA, so “if you repeat the cycle 30 times you’ll have about a million copies, theoretically,” Dr. Yoon explains.

Dr. Yoon’s team instead uses an approach called droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR). The method can identify infection after just three to eight cycles. And the process uses water droplets, which separate contaminants, eliminating the time-consuming step of purifying the sample. The entire process, from sample to answer, can take just five to 10 minutes.

Regular PCR requires expensive equipment and trained lab personnel. But Dr. Yoon hopes to make a fully automated DOTS qPCR device for under $1,000, so it can be used in poorer countries where diseases such as Ebola, MERS, SARS and bird flu require speedy quarantines to prevent epidemics.

Genetics play a key part in other new early diagnostics methods. For example, Stanford University researchers have identified a pattern of gene activity that could lead to a quick blood test for sepsis, which kills 750,000 people annually in the U.S. alone. Meanwhile, a University of Utah team has found DNA anomalies that predict how an ovarian-cancer patient will respond to platinum-based chemotherapy. And scientists at the University of Toronto are using next-generation sequencing to match a sample against a database of thousands of bacteria and viruses, eliminating the need to test one by one.

 

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe. For more from Catherine Bolgar, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion.

Photos courtesy of iStock

Harvesting data to feed the world

By Catherine
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Written by Catherine Bolgar


iStock_000018520587_Small
 

In the 1950s and ‘60s, the green revolution sharply increased crop yields, thanks to fertilizers, pesticides and new seed varieties. But with a billion more mouths to feed by 2025, how will we reap more food without harming the environment? Big data might help.

The global agriculture biotechnology market is forecast to grow to $46.8 billion by 2019, with the bulk focused on transgenic seeds and synthetic biology products such as DNA synthesis and biofuels.

“Technology could improve yields and reduce waste,” says David Lobell, associate professor of earth system science at Stanford University in California. “One of the biggest impacts will be to bring down input costs. That will help not so much in terms of yields but in the price of food and the environmental impact—bringing down water use and fertilizer use.”

As you have better knowledge of what you need, you can reduce the margin of error.”

Genetics: Just as big data has helped scientists tease apart genetic traits in humans, so it is doing for agriculture.

Researchers are mapping the genomes of fungi, parasites, pathogens and plants, which can speed up breeding for traits such as salt tolerance. (About three hectares per minute become too salty for conventional farming.)

“The main idea of genomic selection is that effects of abiotic stresses like heat are controlled by lots of different genes,” Dr. Lobell says. “Those types of things can be better identified by more and more data for lots of different varieties. You can start to statistically pull out smaller effects with larger data sets.”

iStock_000047221908_SmallBig data is analyzing plant populations to understand better why some plants thrive in certain environments and others don’t. The Compadre database is a collection of more than 1,000 plant population models across 600 species, while the similar Comadre database is for animals. The data are difficult to collect, with researchers visiting the sites several times, notes Yvonne Buckley, professor and head of zoology at the University of Dublin.

By looking, for example, at how big and efficient leaves are, scientists hope to be able to predict whether a species will become extinct. “It’s important for food security, which populations might be vulnerable to disappearing,” she says.

Precision agriculture: Big data can also help farmers decide which seeds to plant, whether to apply fertilizers or whether to irrigate. With sensors, they can measure conditions such as soil moisture, while drones can provide a close-up view of far-flung fields in real time. Moreover, technology required to collect this data keeps getting cheaper.

“By monitoring what’s really happening, you can give people information and boost their food security,” says John Corbett, founder and chief executive of aWhere Inc., a Broomfield, Colorado, agriculture intelligence company.

aWhere analyzes temperature, rainfall, humidity (which can affect fungus and mold), solar radiation, wind and agronomic modeling. Its high-tech methods aren’t restricted to developed countries.

Farmer or agronomist in soy bean field with tabletThe cell phone is by far the most influential technology for dispersing information,” Dr. Corbett says. “The penetration of cell phones in sub-Saharan Africa is phenomenal. Any farmer can be connected to the world’s data bank. Without changing anything like seed or fertilizer, they can improve yields 30% just by using better information.”

aWhere delivers information to farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. In Kenya, for example, aWhere supplies weather data to iShamba, a for-profit agricultural advisory company that also produces a hit reality TV show, “Shamba Shape Up” (shamba is Swahili for “farm”) to answer subscribers’ questions and update commodity prices by SMS.

Cell phones can also collect data—aWhere surveys farmers by SMS. As the Internet of Things moves to the farm, tractors and other machinery will be able to transmit data from the field.

“If you can get on-the-ground information, and if you process it and push it back to the person, there’s an enormous amount of optimization and efficiency that will come to the agriculture value chain. Farmers can plan what will sell. They can form cooperatives, which make selling more efficient,” Dr. Corbett says. “If you do it across the value chain, the whole chain strengthens.”

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe. For more from Catherine Bolgar, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion.

Photos courtesy of iStock



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