Could mining asteroids save Earth?

By Alyssa
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Natural Resources are critical to society.  Without them, virtually everything that defines the modern world would disappear, including the houses we live in, the cars we drive, the technology we use to communicate and save lives –  even the shoes we wear and the toothpaste we brush our teeth with. .  However, the future of mining natural resources is uncertain.  We have already extracted the easy-to-access materials, and those of the highest grade.  But as the population of Earth continues to grow, demand for natural resources continues to mount. There is no quick fix, but there are a lot of ideas on how to approach the challenge. One of these involves mining asteroids.

It might sound like science fiction, but both public entities and private companies are actively working on figuring out if asteroids can be a new source of the materials we need on our planet.  Scientists think asteroids hold promise because they are made of the same minerals as Earth.  NASA, for example, has created an Asteroid Redirect Mission with the goal of extracting a boulder from a Near Earth Asteroid and bringing it close to the moon so that astronauts can study what it can offer.  Private companies are also actively involved: space exploration company Planetary Resources is aiming for an exploratory launch by 2020.

The concept of mining asteroids may be capturing the most attention, but there are other paths too, such as leveraging more autonomous machinery or encouraging more conscious consumption.  This isn’t something any one group alone can accomplish.  Mining companies, communities, environmental groups, and individuals must work together to find new approaches.

“If we want a vibrant economy with globally high quality of life and also to protect Earth for future generations, we all have a responsibility to get involved and find a balance that works,” says Marni Rabasso, vice president of Natural Resources at Dassault Systèmes.

Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform can play a key role in finding new solutions, due to its ability to create virtual worlds in which ‘what-if’ scenarios can be simulated to visualize, design and explore new technologies.

In conjunction with CNBC Catalyst Content Studio, Dassault Systèmes created an in-depth look at the challenges ahead in mining our natural resources and the different options that could provide us new sources for what is needed to run our world.  Check out the videos and articles here.  Then come back and tell us: what do you think is the best approach for mining more natural resources?

Supporting the Next Generation of Designers

By Alyssa
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Youngse Kim was born in Korea, but moved to Silicon Valley where he became a celebrated designer of consumer electronics products. Bill Gates called Kim’s iriver MP3 player “a leading design product of the digital era.”

But even after more than 3 decades in California where he founded the high-tech design firm INNO Design, he never forgot where he came from.  Korea has been largely known as a manufacturer of low-cost products, but Kim knew the country was home to many great designers who needed more resources to bring their ideas to market.  To help them along, he founded Design Accelerator Lab (DXL-Lab) in Pangyo, at the heart of Korea’s Techno Valley.

Many Korean designers seek to work at INNO Design, but the firm simply can’t employ all interested applicants.  Kim found a solution with DXL-Lab, which not only helps encourage the design process but also supports other aspects of the development process required to get a product that consumers want into the market.  Key to the program is a cloud-based platform that allows aspiring designers to connect with INNO Design experts and potential investors. Every step of the collaborative process happens on the platform.

Compass recently took a look at the vision for DXL-Lab, and its “Design Together” philosophy.   Learn more about what the organization is doing, including some early successful projects like the Hycore electric bike wheel set to be released in 2017.

Kengo Kuma & Associates Adopts “Design for Fabrication”

By Akio
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China Academy of Art’s Folk Art Museum, Hangzhou, China.
Photo Credit: Eiichi Kano.

We are pleased to announce Kengo Kuma & Associates (KKAA) has selected Design for Fabrication, our BIM solution on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, to improve design speed, accuracy, and collaboration.

KKAA, Japan’s leading architecture firm, is using the AEC industry solution experience from Dassault Systèmes to enhance the quality and efficiency of its architectural designs with a cloud-based collaborative design environment.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: .@KengoKuma & Associates
Adopts Design for Fabrication

KKAA’s designs introduce organic materials that are native to an architectural site’s region—a sophisticated blend of architecture and nature that infuses bamboo, wood, stone and other resources with lengths, angles, cross-sections, arches, patterns and other parameters.

Saint-Denis Pleyel Emblematic Train Station. Photo Credit: Kengo Kuma & Associates.

Notable international KKAA projects include:

  • New National Stadium, Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Stadium (ongoing)
  • V&A Museum of Design, Dundee, Scotland (ongoing)
  • China Academy of Art’s Folk Art Museum, Hangzhou, China
  • Saint-Denis Pleyel Emblematic Train Station, Paris, France (ongoing)

The Design for Fabrication industry solution experience, based on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, provides KKAA with a reliable digital design and collaborative environment, for concept design through fabrication of any architecture project.

This BIM solution enhances KKAA’s parametric design operation and data accuracy capabilities in its design and downstream processes. It also helps KKAA handle organic materials, whose different shapes, lengths and other irregular factors make their use in architecture difficult.

In addition, because of the cloud, Design for Fabrication offers KKAA the scalability to support projects with colleagues in Tokyo, Paris and Beijing. It facilitates real-time access to a single source of project data, enabling KKAA to create more informed designs anytime and anywhere, reduce later rework, and more accurately predict project costs and timelines.

KKAA has the flexibility to improve and refine designs to reflect detailed customer requirements, and can share design models with all stakeholders.

Design for Fabrication provides us with design control capabilities that improve our design speed and accuracy dramatically,” said Toshiki Meijo, Chief of Design Division, KKAA. “Our team can access a single digital resource to better coordinate projects, gather feedback and make any necessary design adjustments. In the future, we plan to deepen this level of collaboration in order to manage multiple projects across offices worldwide while maintaining the high caliber of our designs.”

“Our industry solution experiences tailored for the architecture, engineering and construction industry provide digital continuity between design data and the fabrication model for the shop floor, to reduce redundant design, waste and rework,” said Marty Doscher, Vice President, AEC Industry, Dassault Systèmes.

“Architects at KKAA can more efficiently work with fabricators and builders across the globe to create breathtaking architectural experiences.”

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: How the @kengokuma team efficiently works
w/fabricators & builders worldwide on breathtaking #architecture

V&A Museum of Design, Dundee. Photo Credit: Kengo Kuma & Associates.

Related Resources

Facade Design for Fabrication Industry Process Experience

WHITEPAPER: Technological Changes Brought by BIM to Facade Design

Kengo Kuma & Associates



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