Spotlight on buildingSMART: Driving an open approach to design and construction evolution

By Akio

When Richard Petrie joined buildingSMART as chief executive officer in 2013, he took on the goal of driving the standards-writing organization’s growth — in order to drive change across the entire architecture, engineering and construction industry.

RichardPetrieBuildingSmart_03.2015

Richard Petrie, CEO of buildingSMART

Having worked in construction as both contractor and client, Petrie has seen firsthand the frustrations of a slow-to-evolve architecture, engineering and construction industry. From within buildingSMART — a not-for-profit organization that has been working to standardize the language and processes of BIM (Building Information Modeling) users since 1995 — Petrie has observed an increasing emphasis from several European governments on improving construction efficiency.

“All of those governments have very serious social needs that they have to fulfill with increasingly limited budgets,” Petrie says. “Completing these projects in the best way possible is very important, and you can’t do that if you don’t have accurate and clear data.”

buildingSMART is setting out to provide that data by leading the entire building industry into the digital economy.

Overcoming Fragmentation

There are two key challenges in architecture, engineering and construction industry that buildingSMART is seeking to address.

First is the fragmentation of the supply chain.12 As designers, builders and owners expand their focus to the entire life cycle, it becomes increasingly important to understand how each component and system impacts others. While savvy suppliers are integrating vertically, providing inter-related products, services and knowledge, many designers are finding the information they need through sharable information made possible by BIM.

Second, Petrie finds, construction clients are rarely well informed about the construction, building management and asset ownership process, which means they are also fragmented. For example, the efficiency to which buildings are designed isn’t always met in operation. This is in part because product data isn’t easily transferred from designers and builders to owners and facility managers.

“Altogether, this disjointed relationship with clients and the fragmentation of the supply chain is a great drag on the transformation of the industry,” Petrie says.

Tweet: The #AEC industry is plagued w/ fragmentation & miscommunication. @openbim & @buildingSMART offer a solution. @3DSAEC http://ctt.ec/dP4ea+Click to tweet: “The #AEC industry is plagued w/ fragmentation &
miscommunication. @openbim & @buildingSMART offer a solution.”

 Creating a Universal Approach to Construction

buildingSMART describes openBIM as a “universal approach” to the collaborative design, realization and operation of buildings based on open standards, such as its IFC family of standards. This approach allows all project members to participate in modeling, regardless of the software tools they use; it creates a common language for widely referenced processes; and it provides one system for housing asset data over its entire life-cycle.

Petrie sees openBIM as a solution to the industry’s fragmentation challenges and buildingSMART as a path to the significant opportunities for improvement in building and infrastructure cost, value and environmental performance.

“I believe those opportunities are only truly available with open international standards and, in order to create those open international standards, a neutral entity for the development and promulgation of those standards is needed,” Petrie explains. “That is the role buildingSMART International is taking on.”

With its newly defined vision, the volunteer-driven organization has made major headway in the past year. From creating new standards to defining data to the harmonization of processes across the supply chain, the group has demonstrated real progress and results.

The Push for Interoperability

The group’s push for progress aligns with demand from several governments. As a case in point: Petrie indicates the UK government’s push for interoperability as an example of where openBIM is heading.

While the UK has had requirements for open data since 2012, in 2016 the government will formally launch a program in which procurements must use BIM Level 2 documents.

This set of methodologies is designed to introduce the construction supply chain to trading and operating in a data environment, allowing the government to focus on the strongest leaders and drive value for its spending programs.

It’s a demand driven not by technology, Petrie says, but a cultural shift resulting from seeing real change in how each construction dollar is spent. “That is the reality that will provide the real driver to ensure that this program moves forward the way we hope it will,” he says.

Petrie adds that thus far the group is achieving its predicted targets in the UK, and work is underway for a Level 3 program slated for 2020-2025.

Tweet: Demand for #BIM L2 is a result of seeing change in how each construction dollar is spent @buildingSMART @3DSAEC #AEC http://ctt.ec/o1bHe+Click to tweet: “Demand for #BIM L2 is a result of
seeing change in how each construction dollar is spent”

The Smart Future of Building

To expand the organization’s work, Petrie is seeking to build a community of experts to ensure that future standards accurately reflect the needs of real-world users. Volunteers work at both the international and chapter level, in an integrated process for developing new standards and deploying them into user communities.

buildingSMART graphic_03.2015

Membership in buildingSMART International is open to companies, government bodies and institutions from around the world. Dassault Systèmes joins buildingSMART as an International Member, with full voting membership rights on the new Standards Committee and membership rights with buildingSMART chapters.

The company joins other leading proponents of openBIM that recognize the benefits from openBIM can achieve the greatest impact and momentum by working together in a common community.

Members benefit from the collective activities of other members locally and internationally, and play an active role not only in identifying issues, but also in the development of solutions.

The nature of buildingSMART is that it is a voluntary organization where solutions are developed on a mutually supportive co-developed basis, and so we need members to be active in our community,” Petrie explains.

Petrie acknowledges that it will take time to develop and communicate the organization’s mission, but, he adds, “The changes that we are hoping will be available as a result of these new standards will not only affect the technical communities, but will have implications for the way in which companies function.

Tweet: Spotlight on @buildingSMART: Driving an open approach to design and #construction evolution @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/dfNk2+Click to tweet this article.

 

Related Resources:

Dassault Systemes Architecture, Engineering and Construction Solutions

buildingSMART website

White Paper: End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3

Dassault Systèmes and EXPO 2015: Partnering for A More Sustainable Future

By Amy P.

Expo Milano 2015The World Expo happens only once every five years and therefore, when Dassault Systèmes had the opportunity to sponsor the 2015 World Expo – focused on key eco-sustainability themes – it was natural for us to participate. The 2015 World Expo will take place in Milan, Italy from May 1 to October 31, 2015 and will examine the challenges of balancing nutrition for mankind with respect for the planet’s resources. To support this focus and make the event accessible to all, Expo Milano 2015 has created an online, virtual model of the one million square meter exhibition site. As the leader in 3DEXPERIENCE®, Dassault Systèmes is pleased to be named the Official Expo Sponsor of this effort. Now, virtual visitors can immerse themselves in a real-time 3D universe and explore the venue’s buildings at their own pace and throughout the event’s duration. The first version of the Virtual Tour went live in December 2014 and will continue to be enhanced with interactive 3D features, 360° views, sound effects and high definition images, bringing the event to life in a visual, vibrant and informative manner, and helping to contribute to the global awareness of the planet’s nutritional resources. (New version will be announced in May – stay tuned for more!)

“Expo Milano 2015 is expected to be one of the largest international events of the decade and the subject of nutrition and sharing sustainable solutions resonate in any corner of the globe. Reduction of waste and eco-friendly food choices are sample topics that will be featured during the event. In parallel, creating a 3D tool that offers access to virtual visitors who otherwise would not be able to attend or who wish to complement their visit makes what will take place that much more compelling.”

~ Giuseppe Sala, Commissioner of the Government of Italy for Expo Milano 2015 and CEO of Expo 2015 S.p.A.

“Society as a whole is placing increasing demands for its survival on a planet with diminishing resources, and we must address this reality or risk the well-being of future generations.  Only through seeing and experiencing can society fully discover how a harmony between product, nature and life can positively impact the planet. By offering visualization tools that provide meaningful 3D experiences, we can help inspire imagination and innovation that will meet this challenge and create a more sustainable future.”

~ Bernard Charlès, President and CEO, Dassault Systèmes.

At Expo Milano 2015, over 20 million attendees will experience cultural and culinary traditions and technologies involved in food production from over 140 exhibiting countries, in addition to participating in events, shows, conferences and meetings that address the environment and urbanization.

Click to learn more about EXPO 2015.

To explore the EXPO virtually, click here to visit the Virtual Tour.

Robotics MEGA-Trends at School

By Tony

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 As I posted recently in this manufacturing blog, robotics is trending in a big way, but not just in industry. And schools across the globe are making sure that students are well prepared for this huge wave of automation, robotics and technology coming in the very near future. Schools are not only teaching technology in the classrooms, but are organizing teams and having students compete in different robot competitions. These competitions help students learn and excel in science and math through teamwork and competition. Students learn real-world problem solving by building and programming a robot to compete against other robotics teams. Programs such as FIRST Robotics and FIRST Lego League help to propel students forward. They also support the schools underlying initiative called STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

It takes all kinds of community support

Professionals from many different walks of life have chosen to take on the challenge of coaching these after school teams to help young scientists and engineers further their skills. These robotics teams are very popular with the kids today. In fact, they are so popular that most schools don’t have enough teams or coaches to support the number of students that are interested. While Robotics is definitely mega-trending,, there is a shortage of adult leaders to coach and mentor these young scientists.

Remember why you became an engineer?

Coaching a team gives me such a great feeling of achievement that I cannot understand why anybody would not want to become a coach or support one of these teams in their own community. These young people are so eager to learn and grow, and technology comes to them so naturally. After all, they have been raised around technology their entire lives, so building and programming devices comes easily to them. I love helping these young engineers grow and thrive using technology. I also like being a role model. Because I have a career in robotics, you could say I have Rockstar status. When the team gets tired or frustrated, I’ll try to shift their focus away from the challenges and look at the bigger picture. I start telling stories about my experiences and what it’s like to work with robots. I show pictures and short videos about all the exciting things that robots can do. I love to see their eyes open wide when their brains start imagining the mechanical wonders that computers and mechanical devices can achieve. Dreaming is a lot of the fun for kids, and science and technology teaches us that dreams can become reality. When it comes to the field of robotics, there’s no end in sight. When I see technology stories in the news, I think about all these fine young students that have the technology bug. It occurs to me that technology and the robotics industry definitely have the best days ahead. So I am truly excited when I talk to school kids about technology. I tell them with the utmost confidence that robotics, science and technology have a lot to offer and they should reach for the stars and dream big. That’s what I did.  I have been very fortunate to have a career in robotics, automation and technology. There truly is nothing more exciting than working in a high technology industry that’s so strong and innovative. It’s also refreshing to know that the growth in this industry seems to be finally hitting its stride.

To see more about trends in robotics, visit our community at:
https://swym.3ds.com/#community:179
To see the report The Rise of Robotics by the Boston Consulting Group, visit:

https://www.bcgperspectives.com/content/articles/business_unit_strategy_innovation_rise_of_robotics/



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