Not Your Father’s Drafting Table

By Cliff
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delmia post3D post 3D draftsight cocreation crowdsourcing soliworks 3DS dassault systèmes systemes systems catia enovia simulia 3Dvia delmia 3D modeling PLM 2.0 CAD simulation digital manufacturing design engineering regulations collaboration co-create product creation innovation

WARNING: Old-School Alert! This article will be talking about old-school design work… yes, designing before the use of 3D software…when we drew on paper, and created prototypes by hand.

Long before 3D Printing…before I was in the 3D software industry, and even before I used 3D software on a regular basis, we built prototypes by hand.  I can vividly remember one project, in my first job fresh out of college.  I was freelancing for a very small product design firm.  We were up against a deadline on a proposal for a potentially large project, working late nights on a scaled model, which would have taken us probably 2 days, or less, if we had a 3D Printer.  I remember finishing this fragile model the night before it had to be shipped across country.  The prototype sat in my back seat, cushioned with blankets, as I drove it to the airport to ship, because this was after delivery truck hours.

I’m sure plenty of old-school Product Designers out there remember these stresses, the smells of the model glue, and countless Xacto knife cuts on your fingers.

The Evolution of Prototyping…

Then along came 3D CAD, which made designing must faster, and being able to see products in 3D, on the screen.  Rendering these 3D models was usually an overnight computing process, but it was better than markers and pens (and more headaches).  The next step in visualizing 3D models, was 3D Printing.  Seeing a live model in your hand was a huge advantage to a rendering, however, 3D Printing often requires Xacto blades and painting.

Today, I rarely use an Xacto knife, and have many less headaches from the model glue, and NEVER have to run to the FedEx for overnight prototype shipping.

In 2011, almost every designer uses a computer. Shipping a prototype across country, or the world, can be replaced with placing a 3D design on the web, and sharing a link.  The ability to share data instantaneously is a huge advantage for business.  However, for Product Designers, seeing a model on the web is still not as pragmatic as seeing a design in person.  Being able to walk around a new product and seeing it from every angle requires a physical prototype.

This was the reason 3DVIA created Post3D.  It is the first product which allows Product Designers, and Consumer Product companies to see a product in-context, in a real setting, before any physical prototypes have been built.

If you haven’t had a chance to try Post3D yourself, I encourage you to go for it!

And if you have, what did you think? Does it match our old glue smell memories?

Best,

Cliff

From a PLM challenge to a 3D Serious Game

By Marc
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After having helped Michel Desjoyeaux in his PLM challenge by designing and building his 60ft monohull boat in less than 6 months, we made it possible to discover the strategic aspects of racing, learn how to handle a boat (even in difficult weather conditions!) and understand the main maneuvers to perform on a boat…

How? With a 3D serious game called “Offshore racing with Michel Desjoyeaux”! All within the context of a fun online game, it is possible to experience Michel’s life, accompanied by Mister Desjoyeaux himself who will give you some clues as well as anecdotes about his personal experience in a similar race. ;)

At this occasion, we decided to launch an online contest open until May 28th 2011.

michel, desjoyeaux, marc, pavageau, race, online, game, serious, experiential, innovation, customer, value, PLM, PLM2.0, V6, social, LifeLike, CATIA, Solidworks, enovia, 3DS, 3Dvia, Simulia, swym, Dassault, Systèmes, Systemes, system, delmia, customer, value, engineer, engineering, design, industrial, draftsight

Prizes go from a day with Michel Desjoyeaux (limited to French participants only… sorry non-French people!) to winning high quality sailing jackets, bags, DVDs…

The goal is to be the fastest… So here are some tips for you guys:

  1. The race strategy: find the best balance between the shortest route and the strongest winds… and remember the shorter may not be the better!
  2. The life on board: manage properly the various stages of life on board the ship, it is as important as sailing!

Come on guys, it has to be a 3DPerspectives reader who wins!!

Tell us if you rocked the sea! ;)

Best,

Marc

Marc Pavageau is Dassault Systèmes’ online marketing and communication director.

Digital Pathfinder in 3D

By Michael
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innovation, customer, value, PLM, PLM2.0, V6, social, LifeLike, CATIA, Solidworks, enovia, 3DS, 3Dvia, Simulia, swym, Dassault, Systèmes, Systemes, system, delmia, customer, value, engineer, engineering, design, industrial, draftsight

My first car was a red Volkswagen Beetle which I bought as a student with my grand-father’s budget for 3900 German Mark (equivalent of 1900 Euro).

Money was scarce those days and therefore I happily performed the generic service checks and overhauls myself using a do-it-yourself book called “How to maintain your Beetle”.

I never forget the effort and hassle it was for me changing the four spark plugs on the rear side of that Boxer engine. It was necessary that I literally dove into the engine hood (that is at the backside of the car) and over-stretched my arm in reaching the position where the plugs were found, then blindly fiddled around to set the wrench tool for unscrewing them. My whole body hurt after this services session!

Of course the engineers who developed the famous Beetle engine did not have yet 3D PLM at their hands, neither they had our partner Kineo’s Path Planning application which integrates with Dassault Systèmes’ CATIA, DELMIA and 3DVIA solutions.

So they were not yet able to digitally simulate during their design stage how assembly and service tasks can be performed, in an early stage of the product development using a 3D digital mock-up.

If they could have tested this they would have found out that the body stretch of a person servicing the spark plugs was too difficult and they probably would have redesigned their positions to make them easier to be accessed.


Today’s engineers have the possibility to let Kineo’s 3D intelligence do this magic on their designs, to find collision free motion paths in a 3D assembly environment under given constraints, e.g. how a human body can cope with a given geometry, also how a robot can be dimensioned and programmed to perform specific tasks.

Tests show that dynamic collision detections are performed as fast as 0.8 milliseconds on large 3D models of more than three million polygons. With this it is possible to verify a large number of design alternatives and case studies.

innovation, customer, value, PLM, PLM2.0, V6, social, LifeLike, CATIA, Solidworks, enovia, 3DS, 3Dvia, Simulia, swym, Dassault, Systèmes, Systemes, system, delmia, customer, value, engineer, engineering, design, industrial, draftsight

Kineo is a Dassault Systèmes partner since 2005 with the CAA V5 program, and has now extended this cooperation to offer their technology on the V6 platform.

One major use case is in simulating manufacturing assembly processes to forecast accessibility issues in the virtual simulation which could create costly bottlenecks in production. As a result, optimized designs and assemblies result in better manufacturability and the abilty to perform services.

Airbus is using the Kineo solution integrated with DELMIA for final assembly check for example in the A350 program (read whole story).

A second use case lies in the optimization of servicing procedures, where the Kineo application integrated in 3DVIA Composer finds the best way to assemble or disassemble parts while avoiding collisions. Watch this video that explains how this works.

YouTube Preview Image

What do you think of this capability? Do you like what you see?

Soon more from the wonderful world of engineering.

Best,

Michael



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