GM & PSA Create Buzz in Barcelona

By Karen
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SCC 2011 customer conference Dassault systèmes 3DS DS4 system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3dvia exalead swym 3Dswym draftsight 3Dperspectives 3Dperspective 3D CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 PLM2.0 lifelike experience system engineering sustainable development design digital era

Bon Dia from beautiful Barcelona!

When  J. (Siva) Sivakumar, the Engineering Group Manager for General Motors Powertrain, opened the  23rd annual international SIMULIA Customer Conference on Tuesday, he showed a slide with the names of dozens of engineering simulation software products that  his team uses. Siva joked that Abaqus was at the top of the list because the list was in alphabetical order, but he then stated it was also true that Abaqus is the most used simulation software used by his group!

Siva got a good response from the crowd of engineering analysis experts by showing a quote from a 1980’s poster that read; “Everybody believes the test results except the test engineer, and nobody believes the analysis results except the analysis engineer.”

I could tell that many of the 400 engineers in the session had heard this statement before as they laughed and murmured in acknowledgement of this long-held belief.  He then presented a slide on how GM has turned this adage around, and now Computer Aided Engineering is driving the development process, while physical testing is now mainly used as final validation tool.

Sivakuma SCC 2011 customer conference Dassault systèmes 3DS DS4 system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3dvia exalead swym 3Dswym draftsight 3Dperspectives 3Dperspective 3D CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 PLM2.0 lifelike experience system engineering sustainable development design digital eraHe gave many highly-visual examples on their use of Abaqus and other simulation tools being used to achieve designs with the right ‘first-time’ performance.  In addition to improvement in quality through upfront use of CAE, GM has also achieved significant time and cost reduction by reducing pre-production hardware builds, engineering test vehicles, and warranty costs.

Siva made it clear that, while the CAE vendors have made vast improvements in their simulation software over the years, that is ultimately the users, like those in the audience, that are at the heart of making the realistic simulation an invaluable tool for driving product development.

The rest of the day was jam-packed with 35 customer presentations and 8 complementary technology sessions.  Some highlights include analysis of high speed train disc brake systems by Nabtesco Corporation, drop tests on printers by Xerox Corporation, composites analysis at Fokker Landing Gear B.V. and pedestrian protection analysis by EDAG GmbH & Co. KGaA.

The last presentation of the day was a general lecture on SIMULIA SLM, which included a guest presentation by Benoît Guillaume, numerical Operations Specialist, PSA Peugeot Citroën.   For the past 3 years, Benoît and his team have worked to deploy their Automation and Optimization Platform which aims at improving operational efficiency and capitalizing on best practices.

The hard work of our conference team is paying off at the conference, as the smiling faces and loud conversations of the more than 400 engineers at the conference are clear signs that the event is a real highlight of everyone’s year as they are able to reconnect with long-time acquaintances, make new friends and share their ideas for driving improvements in realistic simulation technology and methods.

The Sangria and tapas served at the Partner Reception hosted by 21 exhibiting partners was a relaxing way to top off a great day at the 2011 SIMULIA Customer Conference!

Stay tuned for more from the conference!

Hasta Mañana!

P.S.: I really think the Sangria, tapas, and sites are definitely worth a future visit to Barcelona! ;-)

Karen

SCC 2011 customer conference Dassault systèmes 3DS DS4 system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3dvia exalead swym 3Dswym draftsight 3Dperspectives 3Dperspective 3D CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 PLM2.0 lifelike experience system engineering sustainable development design digital eraKaren Curtis works in customer referencing for SIMULIA.

Design in Life Pt. 1

By Remi
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dominique cardon stephane vial pierre musso mette thomsen martin tamke dassault systèmes 3DS DS4 system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3dvia exalead swym 3Dswym draftsight 3Dperspectives 3Dperspective 3D CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 PLM2.0 lifelike experience system engineering sustainable development design digital era ayse birsel alain renk frédéric jentgen anne asensio

Dominique Cardon, Stéphane Vial, Mette Thomsen and Martin tamke

As promised I was at Strate College to give you feedback of our event Design in Life. The talks were pretty interesting as there is quite a wide scope of professionals here!

Philosopher Pierre Musso, followed by sociologist Dominique Cardon, focused on “bottom-up innovation”: what is it, and how we can use it? It was mainly about shifting our vision of innovation but let me explain…

Our (humanity’s) usual pattern seems to go: “I imagine something but it’s only possible for me to co-create something with people that share the same mindset. Only next will I open this to a wider audience.”

According to Mr. Cardon, innovation can be fostered if you look at it conversely: “I imagine something and immediately share it with the widest audience. Only then will the co creation begin.” And it’s because the thing imagined was done for a local context and problem that the desire to share arises. The innovation is personal.

The idea behind this new pattern is to give an unexpected direction to the original creation: a way that wasn’t the initially thought one. How many times did you do or say something that was not interpreted as you wanted to? This is the same concept! :-)

And what followed these two presentations was a perfect illustration! Philosopher Stéphane Vial talked about design and what it can do in the digital era from a philosopher’s point of view. And next, digital researchers Mette Thomsen and Martin Tamke did the same… but from a designer’s standpoint.

What happened is that they talked about the same topic but so differently it felt like they were from Mars and Venus. What does that mean? It means that design, just like any other field, can benefit from others’ thinking (philosophers, economists, journalists, etc.) to co create!

This way, design professionals would do what Dominique Cardon said: submit an idea to a wider audience so that co creation reaches new unexpected territories. This is the objective of Design in Life.

Personally I tend to think that what’s missing is to filter the brand new ideas to help those that are most interesting from a societal and economic point of view rise to the top. Another new approach just for the sake of it is useless… so what are our options? What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi

How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3

By Cedric
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georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

So in the previous article we discovered how eddies in certain conditions can be used with great benefit by the iceberg convoy.

Today, we’ll keep on looking at the technical issue of towing an iceberg, but from a general perspective, that is at the scale of the global trip across the Atlantic Ocean:

  • How many tugs are needed?
  • How powerful do they need to be?
  • How much fuel will they consume?

Will the biggest bollard-pull prove to be the most efficient in economical and ecological terms? Naturally, you might expect that the bigger bollard-pull, the quicker you reach the destination point.

In the case of transporting an iceberg, things are not that simple.

The critical success factor is actually to be able to find the perfect ratio in-between the convoy speed and the relative melt of the iceberg and fuel consumption. Only as such will you be able to minimize the energy spent and reduce the carbon footprint.

The power of simulation allows you to repeat the experience as much as you like, by changing whatever relevant parameter: this is what we did regarding the bollard-pull.

I won’t hold you longer. The simulation results are quite surprising: one tug with 130 ton traction would be sufficient to tow a 7 million ton tabular iceberg – the equivalent of a nutshell next to the ice mountain.

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

How is that possible?

Well, above all, the idea is to harness the power of the prevailing currents to transport the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort”. Please refer to the previous article for an explanation of the principle of assisted drifting.

The only cases where you need to use several tugs (two or three, it varies) are the ones where you need to be able to maneuver with great accuracy and where prevailing currents are not necessary here for you, in other words, the departure and arrival phases of the transportation operation.

Fascinating right? Please feel free to leave a message if you have any questions! :-)

Best,

Cédric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experientialCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.



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