Speed Dating @ DS Campus

By Michael

What happens if you gather 150 business people from various partners and from Dassault Systèmes to let them explore joint sales opportunities? My answer : this very much depends on their openness to share information and on the confidence they bring aboard.

Last week we hosted our community of partners at the DS Campus in Vélizy. After we experienced technology innovation during the DS developers’ conference for two days, the “Connecting Partners” Summit day focused on business collaboration for go-to-market. I was thrilled to see the intensity and depth of exchanges taking place everywhere: during coffee breaks, round tables and as part of a meeting format that we called “business speed dating”, where people can test out “if they want to get something going together”.

A collaborative approach to business is very sensible as any cooperation contains certain elements of competition. In a purely economical approach to business you want to get more than you give. However more and more we see a new way of starting business opportunities in an open exchange of information and ideas based on trust. Here you can take your chances and re-mix the ingredients to find the successful cocktail.

What are the benefits from participating in open-hearted communication : be well known, win followers, be influential and respected by peers. My thesis : active participants in professional communication forums get the pole position for being part of winning business collaborations.

I’m curious to hear your opinion. You are invited to complete all phrases where you agree (multiple choices apply).

Please note that for technical reasons you can take this poll via the perspectives.3ds.com site only (not via the email notification).

Thanks. Results of this poll will be discussed in a week from now.

@++
Michael

P.S.: related posts on this subject Community Spirit, Community Mobility

Sustainable Enterprise Backbone with Green PLM

By Brian

It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything on PLM as an Enterprise Backbone. With the global economy the way it is, it is a good time to be alive, economically speaking. This blog post covers the third pillar of the PLM enterprise backbone: sustainable development and regulatory compliance.

The core product and design data managed in PLM is crucial for today’s businesses to manage for their environmental impacts as well as their ability to comply with regulations.

Eco-Design / Sustainability and Regulatory Compliance require integration of the design and development systems with the extended enterprise to manage product impact across engineering, supply chains, manufacturing, distribution, after-market service and maintenance, as well as end-of-life processes (disposal, energy conversion and / or recycling).

Suppliers and engineering can be incorporated into the material compliance evaluation process to ensure the component library contains the most current material compositions and compliance certifications for supplied parts, such as RoHS (Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances) and WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) in electrical and electronic equipment, IMDS (International Material Data Systems) reporting and ELV (End-of-Life Vehicle) in automotive, and REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals), across many discreet and process manufacturing industries.

Working from a PLM basis, companies can explicitly manage their environment posture, from straight compliance-based, to systematic management, all the way to being full pioneers on the leading edge of industry.

PLM enables companies to implement Design for Compliance functions as an integral part of product development. With PLM solutions, product development teams can check material content information from any design early on and throughout the product development cycle. Reports can be generated to compare the compliance of manufacturing equivalents, list recyclable content, or evaluate best and worst manufacturing locations. This information can be cross-referenced against multiple regulations in all geographies, allowing designers to make changes sooner rather than later.

In medical device markets regulatory compliance also needs to be validated to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements throughout the product introduction process. These regulations cover Corrective and Preventive Actions (CAPAs), Nonconformance Reports (NCRs), Product Complaints, Design Control Deliverables, Design History Files, and Quality Audits. Enterprise-wide change control needs to be in place to manage modifications to all documents, specifications, procedures and product configurations to minimize the risk of FDA audit driven plant shut-downs.

From a regulatory compliance standpoint, PLM needs to be managed as a mission-critical enterprise system.

Product companies can avoid late-stage design changes and explore ways of improving product designs while still meeting compliance requirements. Companies can also reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials and substances in their products, thereby avoiding problems such as launch delays, recalls, fines, poor customer satisfaction and a damaged public image.

In addition to regulatory compliance, PLM systems are critical to a company’s overall environmental performance. More than 80% of the ecological impact of a product across manufacturing, usage, maintenance and repair, and end-of-life disposal is determined during initial product design.

Upcoming regulations may even impact the energy efficiency of an entire value-chain, as well as its carbon footprint. This will require companies to manage a portfolio of eco-design initiatives for a product’s material, energy and carbon impacts, necessitating lifecycle analysis and product management through design, sourcing, manufacturing, distribution, and end-of-life processes.

Figures 1 and 2, below, depict a large complex enterprise framework for managing a portfolio of project for sustainable development. Other PLM backbone capabilities come to play including Project and Portfolio Management, Direct Material Sourcing, and Extended Enterprise Collaboration capabilities.

Figure 1: Corporate Level Integrated Environmental Management

Figure 1: Corporate Level Integrated Environmental Management

Figure 2: Lifecycle Analysis (LCA) across a cradle-to-cradle mapping of the industrial ecosystem

Figure 2: Lifecycle Analysis (LCA) across a cradle-to-cradle mapping of the industrial ecosystem

Just a blog article doesn’t really give the space to treat this topic in-depth, but Dassault Systemes is making major investments and initiatives in solutions for Sustainable Development. Those wishing to read further on our company’s approach can review our new corporate report.

The last pillar of PLM as an enterprise backbone will complete the innovation spiral enabled by PLM in a discussion of Integrated New Product Market Launch, as facilitated by PLM.

More later about the fourth pillar of PLM as your enterprise backbone . . .

Best,

Brian

Related posts:

PLM as the Enterprise Backbone: Emerging with Advantage

PLM Enterprise Backbone Pillar 1: Product Portfolio Management

PLM Enterprise Backbone Pillar 2: Working with the Supply Chain

Chasing the Vision of the Virtual Product

By Robert

In my first job two and half decades ago, the notion of a “virtual product design” would have been as remote a thought as the transporter from Star Trek. But over time we’ve all seen a lot of changes in technology, business processes and business models. Some of these trends started as a wave, but became a tsunami that transformed the Hi-Tech industry landscape.

The first evolution that seemed to me big at the time was the move from MRPII to ERP, and the fact that business processes from HR, Manufacturing, Quality, and Finance were all interconnected to produce good results to the bottom-line.

The second wave seemed to be the move from vertical to horizontal business models (remember when Solectron was a small start-up in Silicon Valley?) leading to the $150 billion USD out-sourced manufacturing model we take for granted today to produce our electronics products at the lowest cost. In addition to manufacturing, Electronic Manufacturing Services (EMS) companies are now also supporting Original Design and Manufacture (ODM) and Joint Design and Manufacturing models as a part of the business. These new models continue the wave for horizontal business evolution.

Now for me, I think I am seeing the start of a transformation as revolutionary in PLM 2.0. This starts with the ability to capture requirements, functional descriptions of features, models of system behavior and finally the engineering and physical product on a single platform. This Requirements to Features to Logical to Physical (R-F-L-P) model allows for us to begin the journey to create the ‘virtual product’.

Now product concepts can be reviewed, modeled and tested perhaps before we even invest in any ‘design resources’, let alone a physical ‘golden’ version of the product. The high costs of avoiding physical prototyping or finding ‘issues’ based on physical prototypes (translate this as ‘it’s not working) are revolutionary in my opinion. We can already see this type of innovation starting to occur in the ‘high-fashion’ consumer electronics industry, where several global Dassault Systemes customers are modeling and configuring product features and platform technologies prior to investing in expensive traditional design resources.

Many customers we talk to want to also find ways to eliminate the frustrating and manual processes required to track issues in the final product to the original requirements. This is where the RFLP model can be used in reverse, like a “Where-Used” function in traditional PDM (hey, where is this part or item used), but now much more effectively and with greater impact. Now, we can trace with PLM 2.0 and Dassault Systemes V6 from end-product, to design, to systems (features) and finally to the signed-off requirements for the product in a single platform, database, and system.

Of course, this journey will be a winding road, but like every major transformation the end result will be more customer intimacy and satisfaction, fewer products that miss the mark. Along the way, I believe companies on the leading edge of this vision will have greater efficiencies, greater long term success and the margins and markets that define winners from losers.

Best,

Robert



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Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.