Three questions to Toshiko Mori

By Remi
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Toshiko Mori Dassault Systemes Board Administration architecture design award

I met Toshiko right after her introduction to the board of administration of Dassault Systèmes. She held a conference here at the Vélizy Campus the same day and I thought you’d like to hear her thoughts on Design and its near future…

You’re now member of the board of administration of Dassault Systèmes, congratulations! It’s a first of a kind for you… how does it feel?

That’s true yes! I served in non-profit boards in the past, mainly focused on arts and architecture. I’m currently part of the board “Architecture for Humanity”, advising them on design excellence quality.

So this is my first time in a corporate board.  It’s a very humbling experience, I’m learning a lot and I hope I’ll be able to contribute.

During your presentation this morning you talked a lot about how Architecture and Design will have evolved by 2050. Can you give us the three key points that will embody this revolution?

One of our major issues right now is food. We call it energy, water and food crisis as they’re interdependent on each other.  What’s underlying is the uneven distribution of population and the rapid urbanization problems. How to provide these people with food, water and energy? It’s not so much about water scarcity but how to make it available according to the population density.

So my three items would be: jobs, water and food. We already have a job shortage which triggers instability in the developing world. In Middle East and Northern Africa, young people don’t find jobs and thus rebel. It’s as simple as that and unfortunately it will not happen in 2050 – it’s already happening.

So, if you build something, it automatically brings in jobs. Then, if it attracts attention, it will also bring in tourists, which means income. So designers have to make sure that whatever they do, they make the best design, so that people notice it and want to come. Second step is to think about the opportunities your design has created for next generations, whether it is in terms of job growth, making buildings, designing a city, etc.

Native Americans say that for every act you do, you have to think about its impact seven generations down the road. So if you always think that way in design, it really is a sustainable practice but it’s also a much more global thinking.

Does this revolution in the way you think as an architect lead to a revolution in the way students learn architecture? Do we need renewed teaching models?

Definitely. We tend to think of teaching in architecture and design as a building or a product: it’s an object-based teaching. But now we’ve got to teach students the context as well.

For example, if we’re talking about a building, what’s surrounding it? Which city or town are we dealing with? What’s its relationship to nature? What’s its overall location? What about the geopolitics? How does it relate in terms of global issues?

The world we’re living in is very complex and consequences can affect much larger parameters. I’ve been teaching a course called Global re-Design Project for the last two years. I’m also about to teach another course centered on Global Risks and Management, i.e. how can design have a built-in resilient system so that buildings can withstand natural catastrophes for example.

The way you think about contextual issues, away from designing objects, is to know the parameters of different possibilities for both negative things (from terrorist attacks to tsunamis, earthquakes and so on) and good opportunities (bringing educational opportunities and healthcare to the children in Africa).

The key is to turn the teaching model into something highly contextual: have larger parameters, be accessible and inclusive.

——————–

Any thought that pops up in your mind? I had a thousand ones when I interviewed her! :)

Cheers,

Rémi

Exclusive 3D Reconstruction of the Djedi Robot Findings in the Great Pyramid

By Mehdi
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As part of our Passion for Innovation sponsorship program, Dassault Systèmes partnered with Scoutek and Leeds University, UK, in 2009, supporting the Djedi Robot Mission to explore the mysterious shafts in the Great Pyramid.

If the Passion for Innovation initiative allows us to provide financial support for this innovative project our strength lies, above all, in our ability to add our 3D engineering competency and cutting-edge 3D technology to such missions.

My team and I are proud to be a part of this cross-disciplinary and innovative team, selected by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities to send a robot probe named Djedi into the Queen’s Chamber shafts and explore parts of the Great Pyramid hidden from human eyes for 4,500 years.

Last week stories from New Scientist, Discovery, CNN and others broke the news that the Djedi robot had revealed some previously undiscovered hieroglyphs in one of the shafts and relayed these never seen before images.

These images and mission reports were published in the 84th edition of Annales du Service Des Antiquités de l’Egypte (ASAE), the official publication of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities.

The robot has been designed and simulated in 3D to make sure it would work on the field right from the start and would be easily maintained in operations.

But 3D is not only a tool for engineers and we believe that the best way to experience this adventure for yourself is through 3D experiences we are able to deliver. We spent this weekend capturing images in real-time, in a virtual 3D world, to help the public -all publics- understand what the robot has seen.

You’ll see the robot and its environment in full context.  Without need for words, you’ll understand the technical challenge as you’ll see Djedi navigate itself through a 20cmx20cm tunnel in the pyramid.

Djedi Queen chamber great pyramid giza dassault systeme

We would like to remind the public that, as exciting as this work is, it is a work in progress.  We still have much to learn from Djedi, and Egyptologists still must interpret the meaning and significance of the hieroglyphs.

“Red-painted numbers and graffiti are very common around Giza,” says Peter Der Manuelian, an Egyptologist at Harvard University and a Passion for Innovation partner. “They are often masons’ or work-gangs’ marks, denoting numbers, dates or even the names of the gangs.”

3D has a way of turning question marks into exclamation points, and we enjoy sharing this with you.

Best,

Mehdi

Dassault Systemes 3DS Giza Pyramid Djedi Mehdi is the Interactive Strategy Director at Dassault Systèmes.

Three Years of 3D Perspectives

By Kate
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There are moments in life that call for particular reflection:  birthdays with a zero, weddings, etc. 

As I’m experiencing one of these moments, moving on to new professional adventures, I’d like to share my perspective on some topics we’ve been discussing on this blog the past three years. 

How have the worlds of 3D and product innovation evolved since 2008?

3D
For sure 3D has become more mainstream, although the ultimate sign will be when kids use 3D software to design their Mother’s Day decorative vase gifts and print them—both actions from home.  Some signs that we’re getting closer to widespread adoption, take LG’s recent Optimus 3D announcement.  Optimus 3D is a smartphone with a glasses-free 3D screen and 3D recording camera.  

Or what about 3D food printing?  And I’ll bet you at least thought about asking Santa for a Sony 3DTV last year . . . but you probably changed your mind because the quantity and quality of 3D content isn’t ready yet.  Rest assured it will be as soon as enough creatives have embraced 3D as their expression medium. 

Innovation
I’m not sure innovation is something that can evolve, but I do feel comfortable saying that the processes to capture and manufacture innovation have progressed.  With social computing platforms bleeding into the workplace, new fangled ideas are digitally captured, commented on, morphed into even crazier but ingenious concepts, and sometimes, when a business model can be agreed upon, produced and sold. 

As Orange Labs Sociologist Dominique Cardon said at our recent Design in Life event, “Bottom-up innovations must be local and personal, and because they are personal, their inventors are driven to share with others.  This is when the innovation process begins.”  Personal innovations for the greater good. 

With mobile technology conquering our hearts and pocketbooks, smartphones and tablets are slowly replacing the pulp-constituted idea notebook.  Armed with them at all times, we can now plug our ideas directly into the digital grid, rather than first writing them down on that sheet of paper that may get lost with our socks. 

Reality
I’d say how we consider reality has definitely changed.  Virtual is no longer considered fake or marginal.  We’re starting to trust it.  So much that we’re opting to test agricultural innovations, the safety of new mobility concepts, and Dr. Seuss-like building designs as real-life dress rehearsals.  Lifelike experience

We’re using devices to augment our physical world experiences and obtain complimentary information, even as urban tourists in some cases.  Digital has changed our notion of what’s really possible, and what you see is not only what you get.  Your cereal box is not just about cereal. 

PLM
When the likes of Oracle start taking interest in Product Lifecycle Management, I’d say we’re up to a new level.  This technology is no longer just for IT geeks. 

PLM is C-level strategic.  And once the boardroom decides to go for it, designers, engineers, purchasing, marketers, the supply chain, consumers, and, IT geeks all find their place and solution within the PLM network.  PLM, the united colors of making stuff.

I will miss you once I’m gone.  But rest assured there are great people that will keep 3D Perspectives alive and feisty.  And most important there’s YOU. 

Like my High School Principal Dr. Jewel always said at the fall welcome assembly, “What you get out of Needham B. Broughton is a direct correlation to what you put into it.”  So replace my alma mater with 3D Perspectives and go for the purple and gold.  Oops, sorry, a pep rally slip.  Just go for the gold. 

I wish you the best and look forward to our next encounter, online or offline.

Warmest regards,

Kate

Twitter @KateBo



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