How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3

By Cedric
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georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

So in the previous article we discovered how eddies in certain conditions can be used with great benefit by the iceberg convoy.

Today, we’ll keep on looking at the technical issue of towing an iceberg, but from a general perspective, that is at the scale of the global trip across the Atlantic Ocean:

  • How many tugs are needed?
  • How powerful do they need to be?
  • How much fuel will they consume?

Will the biggest bollard-pull prove to be the most efficient in economical and ecological terms? Naturally, you might expect that the bigger bollard-pull, the quicker you reach the destination point.

In the case of transporting an iceberg, things are not that simple.

The critical success factor is actually to be able to find the perfect ratio in-between the convoy speed and the relative melt of the iceberg and fuel consumption. Only as such will you be able to minimize the energy spent and reduce the carbon footprint.

The power of simulation allows you to repeat the experience as much as you like, by changing whatever relevant parameter: this is what we did regarding the bollard-pull.

I won’t hold you longer. The simulation results are quite surprising: one tug with 130 ton traction would be sufficient to tow a 7 million ton tabular iceberg – the equivalent of a nutshell next to the ice mountain.

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

How is that possible?

Well, above all, the idea is to harness the power of the prevailing currents to transport the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort”. Please refer to the previous article for an explanation of the principle of assisted drifting.

The only cases where you need to use several tugs (two or three, it varies) are the ones where you need to be able to maneuver with great accuracy and where prevailing currents are not necessary here for you, in other words, the departure and arrival phases of the transportation operation.

Fascinating right? Please feel free to leave a message if you have any questions! :-)

Best,

Cédric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experientialCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.

C-Level Systems Engineering

By Kate
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systems engineering 3DS dassault systèmes system systemes catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3Dvia draftsight CAD CAM PLM product lifecylce management 2.0 engineer

Whether you’re a CEO or child, systems engineering is worth understanding because it’s strategic for things important to our everyday living.  Think power plants, trains, planes and cars . . .

I learned something in making this video, and I hope you will too in watching it!

So without further delay, here’s an animated definition of systems engineering, elementary style:

YouTube Preview Image

Sooo, does it pass the C-test?

Best,

Kate

3D Modeling and Printing for All

By Remi
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mass production end 3DS dassault systèmes systemes 3D printing catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia 3Dvia draftsight CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management 2.0 lifelike experience systems engineering

As you know I’m pretty much all the time on Twitter and I found a very interesting tweet the other day I wanted to share with you (it’s from @_victorien):

Will 3D Printing End Mass Manufacturing? http://on.mash.to/h9MPzc

I was actually surprised to see how far people could look when facing an idea. Ending mass manufacturing? Where does 3D printing take us?

Personally, I couldn’t help noticing that everyone is focusing on the cost of 3D printers… but does it matter when people can’t design their own 3D models? Because if they can’t, it’s not different from mass market production from a consumer’s point of view: they buy something they did not create, that others will have as well. In other words it won’t be unique.

So your dear blogger (hmm… me!) went across the Web to check out what was going on, if there was a solution. And to be honest I was disappointed! When you learn about that kind of big news (3D printing), you expect results (printing in 3D right away).

And when you live in the present, you expect these results to be open: available for everyone to share, modify and create.

What’s the point of having a personal printer if you can’t use it? (i.e. you don’t have a software to control it)

But guess what? We’re on it! :-)

Making it easier and for everybody, that’s the goal. So 3Dvia people published a book (in French at the moment) to provide users with an official guide to 3Dvia Studio. If you prefer English, you also have loads of resources on the 3Dvia website:

3Dvia logo 3DS dassault systèmes systems catia solidworks delmia enovia simulia CAD CAM PLM product lifecycle management lifelike experience systems engineering

  • Project examples with the source code available (here)
  • Tutorials (here)
  • Official documents to get started with the software (here)

Of course, this is only the beginning: there’s not only 3Dvia Studio to turn to something available to neophytes and it’s a long-term effort to educate people to this whole new approach to product consuming but it’s definitely worth it!

I was talking with people on Twitter and they told me it would take less than 5 years to see 3D printing started commercially speaking. It feels like a short time to me… What do you think?

Cheers,

Rémi



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