Retailers juggle selection, convenience and speed

By Catherine
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By Catherine Bolgar

Asian woman signing receipt of delivered package

The rise of e-commerce has left brick-and-mortar retailers struggling to catch up. In the latest escalation, the introduction of same-day delivery is further transforming online shoppers’ expectations of serviceyet this development ultimately might be a boon for traditional retailers.

It’s all about the customer. It’s always about the customer, about being able to adapt to the marketplace to satisfy the customer,” says Robert L. Williams, Jr., assistant professor of marketing at Susquehanna University, in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.

Since 2005, when the U.S.’s biggest online retailer launched a membership scheme, with customers paying a monthly fee for services like streaming and for free two-day delivery—same-day delivery in certain markets—competitors have scrambled to keep up. Just between January 2014 and May 2016, shipping times fell 46% to 3.4 days from 6.3 days, according to an average of 238 merchants and online sellers surveyed by Slice Technologies Inc., a Palo Alto, California, shopping and package-tracking application. As a result of new technology making tracking easier, “Customers recognize they have that power, and they want to exercise it,” Prof. Williams notes.

Woman shopping online on laptop computer with credit cardA key objective, says Kenneth Cassar, Slice’s principal analyst, is “challenging consumers to think differently about the online channel. In the past, online was the place to go for low prices and broad selection. Increasingly, people are looking to the e-commerce channel for convenience. Convenience is creeping up on price and selection for importance.

Any retailers aiming for same-day delivery face the same problems, according to a white paper published by Quintiq, a supply-chain optimization firm owned by Dassault Systèmes. The usual methods of assigning slots are unable to satisfy both cost savings and customer satisfaction. With regular rounds, customers don’t have enough choice for delivery time, but with dynamic slots, drivers waste time and fuel delivering a package at a certain time for one customer and then, hours later, a package next door for another customer. Quintiq uses forecasts to allocate delivery slots dynamically, updating in real time. That minimizes driving while giving customers maximum choice of delivery time.

Same-day delivery doesn’t apply to all of the millions of items for sale by online retailers, meaning even e-commerce behemoths must juggle convenience vs. selection. They must also invest in warehouses in order to get goods close enough to population centers for quick delivery, notes Daphne Carmeli, chief executive of Deliv. The Menlo Park, California, company works with retailers and businesses to provide same-day delivery in 17 U.S. markets using crowd-sourced drivers.

However, brick-and-mortar retailers already have vast inventory that’s conveniently close to customers—inside their stores. “Much of their inventory sits within a short drive of 90% of the population,” Ms. Carmeli says. “How do you leverage your stores to be the forward-fulfillment centers? Drivers leverage their GPS-enabled smart phones to respond to delivery requests. These technologies that power the supply and demand were not available 10 years ago.”

Retail chains and franchises are using “click and collect” or BOPIS (buy online, pick up in store) to give online shoppers the convenience of quick fulfillment from a store at no charge. Or they leverage the capabilities of BOPIS along with a service like Deliv to offer same-day delivery as an option at checkout. When customers select same-day delivery, Deliv is automatically notified of the order and dispatches a driver to pick up and deliver the order when it is ready, Ms. Carmeli says.

Retailers are “looking for opportunities to create a channel-integrated environment,” says Lars M. Bollweg, researcher at the Competence Center E-Commerce at the South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences in Soest, Germany.

Attractive woman checking bar code in shopping mallOriginally, retailers had a single channel, meaning a brick-and-mortar shop that people visited. That involved one database of customers in the background. With the arrival of the Internet, retailers had a physical shop and an online shop, each with a separate database. But both channels remained strictly separated. If someone ordered in the online shop, the sales clerks in the brick-and-mortar shop knew nothing about it, Mr. Bollweg says.

That improved with cross-channel management software, which let both databases talk to each other a little while remaining separated.

Then came omnichannel, or one big customer database. “Wherever the customer meets the company—by phone, online, in person—the retailer knows the whole history of shopping events,” such as whether the customer purchased frequently, or recently encountered a problem with a purchase, Mr. Bollweg says. “Omnichannel offers more opportunity to deliver more advanced services, but it’s tricky to do. It’s expensive. And it’s very challenging for small shops.” With apps and location services, for example, a store can send you a coupon for a discount just at the moment you’re in the neighborhood.

As a result, local shopping platforms sprang up to implement the strategy for groups of shops that would split the cost. Such shops, often run by individual entrepreneurs who lack technological skills, benefit from the platform’s e-commerce know-how, Mr. Bollweg says.

For example, a public-private initiative in a German city gives local small retailers an omnichannel framework, including centralized delivery of goods and returns. These platforms are a big trend in Germany, and also exist in the U.S. and Switzerland. However, some are only a year old and haven’t yet turned profitable, he says.

While more people are choosing same-day delivery for a bigger assortment of purchases, it’s still “very, very early days,” Mr. Cassar says. “I would be shocked if 20 years from now the majority of online sales were being delivered to consumers on the same day.

The market has “room for everybody,” Dr. Williams concurs, “but with the customer in control, everybody has to step up their game. There’s no room for being complacent.”

 

 

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe, now working as a freelance writer and editor with WSJ. Custom Studios in EMEA. For more from Catherine Bolgar, along with other industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion on LinkedIn.

Photos courtesy of iStock

How one company reduced design errors by 50%

By Alyssa
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Chongqing Yinhe Experimental Equipment Co. Ltd (CQYH) is China’s leading research organization.  It develops and manufactures environmental and reliability testing equipment both in series and for specific customer requirements. Its equipment is used by companies in the military, high tech, aerospace and automotive sectors around the world. While it is among the top three environmental instrument manufacturers in the world market, CQYH was facing increasing pressure from competitors. To stay ahead, they set a goal to improve development efficiency and to create a better user experience by focusing on creating products that promote the sustainable growth of its customers.

To accomplish this, they needed to re-engineer their order fulfillment cycle to accelerate delivery of products tailored to customer requirements. CQYH chose Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform® and its Simple Solution Selection industry solution experience. One of the advantages to this new system is that they can input customer requirements and display them in a 3D model. The customer can review and validate the design then instantly confirm it for production. This has essentially eliminated the need for physical prototypes for customer review, which has accelerated order fulfillment by 50%.

The solution also facilities a better understanding of exactly with customers want, reducing design errors by 50%improving time to delivery and customer satisfaction.

To learn more about the benefits CQYH has seen through the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and Simple Solution Selection that have helped them more successfully compete on an international scale, read our recently-published case study.

To BIM or not to BIM?

By Akio
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The following article was originally published by Geoff Haines on the Desktop Engineering Blog and is reprinted with permission. 

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: To BIM or not to BIM?
@3DSAEC @Desktop_Eng


Geoffrey M. Haines, Desktop Engineering

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

I can’t claim originality to this Shakespearean title which has suitable gravity for many companies in the construction industry. It was thought up by Dr Steve Lo of Bath University for a one-day conference I attended organised by the “Future Envelope” community of façade designers and manufacturers.

Drawing from members of the European Façade Networks, the Society of Façade Engineers and Centre for Window Cladding technology, the aim of the conference was to discuss how BIM can help or even hinder the design and construction process of building facades.

To start off, early presentations included how professionals and companies can gain accreditation to be BIM Level 2 compliant. This is a requirement for any building design and construction contract delivered to the UK government since April 2016. Hence it’s a hot topic and the explanations given by BRE (Building Research Establishment) on their BIM Level 2 certification process were received well.

Certainly I see great opportunity for individual consultants to template the people, process and technology needs of BIM certification so smaller firms can overlay this on their business at minimum cost.

Other presentations discussed how both architects and engineers worked with different technologies to achieve the aim of clear communication of design intent.

Abdulmajid Karanouh of Ramboll gave a really thoughtful presentation discussing what architects really need to do to communicate to their supply chain.

What I really found interesting was the discussion on The Al-Bahr Towers, designed by Aedas of which Abdulmajid was part of the team. Aedas created a design specification that wasn’t a model, but a set of geometrical formulae and process that would create the design.

This is the ultimate “CAD’nostic” design.

Any CAD package that could be driven by some sort of scripting or formula could create this geometry – giving the geometrical definition of a 1000-person tower.

I found this approach quite revolutionary, taking the architect’s idea into a form that could be expressed mathematically – something my engineer’s brain could comprehend.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: .@Aedas created not a model, but a set of formulas and processes to produce a design | #architecture #BIM @DesktopEng

Ultimately, when the selected suppliers all delivered their design information, this was all consolidated into the Dassault Systemes CATIA based technology to deliver a BIM model. This approach caused some real heated interchange about an architect’s definition of form.

Overall, the conclusion to the day was mixed – the smaller firms seeing it as an overhead, the larger firms seeing it as a necessity – but one thought overriding all this discussion was ‘who pays for it?’

In automotive and aerospace, we all know that that more upfront design activity delivers lower costs downstream.

In construction, these two activities are delivered by different bodies, with different earnings streams – extra costs in design delivers savings for contractors.

So I’ll leave you with this – how do we square this circle?

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: To BIM or not to BIM?
@3DSAEC @Desktop_Eng


by Geoff Haines


Related Resources

Desktop Engineering, UK

Facade Design for Fabrication

WHITEPAPER: Technological Changes Brought by BIM to Façade Design

VIDEO: Facade Design for Fabrication Demo



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