Enabling Flow: Knowledge Based Construction

By Akio

 

This post is an excerpt of the white paper “Lean Construction ‐ Advanced Project Delivery for the AEC Industry” from Dassault Systèmes’ Value Solution Business Partner CornerCube.

As organizations begin to understand the power of adopting an LPD approach to their programs and projects, they realize that a change process is underway and recognize that the production system is highly complex and dynamic.  Every project has a lifecycle beginning with the business case and defining requirements to final installation and beneficial use.

During the progression of the project’s lifecycle, the opportunity to influence or optimize the project’s development and eventual outcome lessens dramatically.

Tweet: As an #AEC project progresses, opportunity to optimize the outcome lessens dramatically @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/Rqnpc+Click to tweet: “As an #AEC project progresses,
opportunity to optimize the outcome lessens dramatically”

Project Production Transformation process and opportunity to influence

Project Production Transformation process and opportunity to influence

Easily recognizable is the single line flow of delivery regardless of delivery method depicting the transformation process, buffers created (time, inventory, and capacity).  The simple flow can be as depicted below:

CornerCube White Paper Basic Production Flow

Basic Production Flow

What is not acknowledged is this same sequence of events is played out countless times on a project at the macro and micro level.  Every component, assembly, or action must undergo this same transformation to achieve a desired and successful outcome.

The production system looks more like the image depicted below where every work stream is affected, and managing buffers and the four knowledge flows (Information, Design, Supply Chain / Logistics, and Site Assembly) are critical.

CornerCube White Paper Production System Knowledge Flow

Production System Knowledge Flow

Achieving Optimal Production

Achieving an optimal production system often includes:

  • innovative operating agreements to attain integrated governance that  optimize  the  performance  of  the  collective  enterprise;
  • enabling technology  platforms  that efficiently manage the immense amounts of critical data in order to optimize the knowledge and physical flows that drive value creation; and,
  • effective processes that support continuous improvement and creative solutions that optimizes how work is planned, controlled and executed to drive out waste and deliver value (integrated governance, value management, delivery management).

Having the vision and desire to improve outcomes, and launching an LPD program without hesitation but with clear purpose, is often necessary to deliver beneficial change.

Tweet: The desire to improve outcomes & an LPD program w/ clear purpose is necessary to deliver change @3DSAEC #BIM #AEC http://ctt.ec/P3nc5+Click to tweet: “The desire to improve outcomes & an LPD
program w/ clear purpose is necessary to deliver change”

Industry Example

As  an  example,  Pat  Henderson,  president  of Hardstone Construction Company in Las Vegas, Nevada, sensed the potential risk on his large Tivoli Village at Queensridge Project  was  larger  than  any  one  organization  could  identify,  let  alone  manage.  To assist in identifying this risk, increase owner value, and reduce waste, he embraced several lean principles by creating an integrated virtual design and construction (iVDC) team.

Using Dassault Systèmes’ CATIA solution, the team not only  created  a  clash‐free  3D  model,  but  more  importantly,  by  leveraging  CATIA’s  knowledge  management capabilities, the team was able to drive better solutions to address extensive design changes, optimize system configurations, and support real‐time operations.  The risk Pat believed they would discover materialized as he predicted.  His preparation in assembling an iVDC team that developed production‐based solutions enabled Pat to better manage and mitigate that risk, and ensured the better outcomes he experienced.

Knowledge Flow-Based Construction

This type of knowledge flow‐based construction will dominate the conversation over the next decade. Enterprise 2.0 methodologies will drive digitally connected and highly integrated project communities where:

  • 3D will become a universal language for effective communication
  • Experiences and knowledge will be shared openly in a 24/7 project ecosystem to increase the speed, quality, and throughput of delivery solution
  • Emerging social  software  platforms  designed  for  the  construction  industry  will  become  the  digital environments which contributions and interactions will be globally visible and persistent over time
Fernando Espana, Founder and President of CornerCube Inc.

Fernando Espana, Founder and President of CornerCube Inc.

To learn more, read the full white paper “Lean Construction ‐ Advanced Project Delivery for the AEC Industry” from Dassault Systèmes’ Value Solution Business Partner CornerCube.

CornerCube is a Dassault Systèmes partner located in the San Francisco Bay area, offering Lean construction solutions, 3D technology solutions, and related technical services to the AEC industry.

 

Tweet: Enabling Flow: Knowledge Based Construction @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC #BIM  http://ctt.ec/s9A28+Click to tweet this article

 


Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Lean Construction – Advanced project Delivery for the AEC Industry White Paper

 

High Demand for New Solutions at BIM World 2015 in Paris

By Akio

In Paris, March 25-26, BIM World 2015 showcased a global vision of the life cycle, equipment, buildings, urban infrastructure, users, and services. This year’s theme was “Redesigning the Innovation Code.”

BIM World 2015

Tweet: High Demand for New Solutions at #BIMWorld 2015 in #Paris | @bim_world @Dassault3DS @AEC_Cafe #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/fnZzP+Click to tweet this article

The sold-out event attracted broad attendance from architects, designers and contractors, to those from government, other industries, and the general public. Following the 2014 European Directive on the use of digital processes in building information modeling (BIM), there was intense interest at BIM World 2015 in the new technologies being shown and the solutions available.

BIM World 2015 from Dassault Systemes

Many within the AEC industry in France recognize they are late adopting BIM industrialization compared to other countries. Attendees at BIM World in Paris showed high interest in these BIM solutions, driven by the current French housing and economic environment and a need to reduce building costs and increase efficiencies of construction projects.

French Minister Sylvia Pinel

Underscoring the importance of these endeavors, Sylvia Pinel, Minister of Housing, Equality Territories and Rural Affairs opened the roundtable, titled “The French Roadmap for the Digital Transition of Construction,” on Wednesday, 25 March. A digital revolution is taking place in the building industry, and “the term revolution is no exaggeration,” said Pinel.

Tweet: A digital revolution is taking place in France's building industry. #BIM #AEC @bimworld @AEC_Cafe http://ctt.ec/ta62C+Click to tweet: “A digital revolution is
taking place in France’s building industry.”

Popular Discussions

The many sessions and discussions held centered on BIM. It is clear that the building and construction industry in France is ready to adopt this technology. Attendees were actively exploring how to implement BIM and wanted to get into the specifics, such as:

  • Return on investment with BIM
  • How companies have successfully implemented BIM into their life cycles
  • When companies can expect to realize benefits after implementing BIM
  • New building efficiency through BIM
  • BIM for infrastructure
  • BIM as a marketing vehicle for construction and building projects

Solutions for BIM Showcased

Dassault Systèmes was well-positioned at the event. The company brings more than 30 years of knowledge, experience, and outstanding technology solutions from its work around the world and in other industries, such as aerospace, automotive, shipbuilding, and others.

The demonstrations presented at BIM World supported Dassault Systèmes’ reputation for expertise and excellence. Attendees were very excited to see these solutions. There was high demand and interest in how these solutions can help companies become more efficient to accelerate innovation.

Highlighted solutions included:

  • Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience –The solution provides a collaboration-based project backbone that enables centralized project and data management, construction simulation for better planning and execution, and the right information to be available to the right people at the right time.
  • Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience – The solution connects your design data from concept through fabrication for collaborative, industrialized construction.
  • Building Energy Efficiency Solution, so called “Smart Building Experience” leveraging Dymola for simulation and Modelica for modeling – This experience showed the 3DS Campus building temperature changing as the sun moves east to west during the day.

“France is now pushing its adoption of BIM, and that came through at this year’s BIM World,” said Marty Doscher, Vice President, AEC Industry, Dassault Systèmes. “The excitement at the event was electric, and the discussions demonstrated a high level of understanding with BIM. We expect to see many more exciting projects in the years ahead!”

 

Tweet: #France is now pushing its adoption of #BIM, and that came through at this year's #BIMWorld | @AEC_Cafe @bim_world #AEC http://ctt.ec/Kw8GJ+ Click to tweet: “#France is now pushing its adoption of
#BIM, and that came through at this year’s #BIMWorld”


 

Related resources:

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction Solutions

Best Practice White Paper: End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3

Spotlight on buildingSMART: Driving an open approach to design and construction evolution

By Akio

When Richard Petrie joined buildingSMART as chief executive officer in 2013, he took on the goal of driving the standards-writing organization’s growth — in order to drive change across the entire architecture, engineering and construction industry.

RichardPetrieBuildingSmart_03.2015

Richard Petrie, CEO of buildingSMART

Having worked in construction as both contractor and client, Petrie has seen firsthand the frustrations of a slow-to-evolve architecture, engineering and construction industry. From within buildingSMART — a not-for-profit organization that has been working to standardize the language and processes of BIM (Building Information Modeling) users since 1995 — Petrie has observed an increasing emphasis from several European governments on improving construction efficiency.

“All of those governments have very serious social needs that they have to fulfill with increasingly limited budgets,” Petrie says. “Completing these projects in the best way possible is very important, and you can’t do that if you don’t have accurate and clear data.”

buildingSMART is setting out to provide that data by leading the entire building industry into the digital economy.

Overcoming Fragmentation

There are two key challenges in architecture, engineering and construction industry that buildingSMART is seeking to address.

First is the fragmentation of the supply chain.12 As designers, builders and owners expand their focus to the entire life cycle, it becomes increasingly important to understand how each component and system impacts others. While savvy suppliers are integrating vertically, providing inter-related products, services and knowledge, many designers are finding the information they need through sharable information made possible by BIM.

Second, Petrie finds, construction clients are rarely well informed about the construction, building management and asset ownership process, which means they are also fragmented. For example, the efficiency to which buildings are designed isn’t always met in operation. This is in part because product data isn’t easily transferred from designers and builders to owners and facility managers.

“Altogether, this disjointed relationship with clients and the fragmentation of the supply chain is a great drag on the transformation of the industry,” Petrie says.

Tweet: The #AEC industry is plagued w/ fragmentation & miscommunication. @openbim & @buildingSMART offer a solution. @3DSAEC http://ctt.ec/dP4ea+Click to tweet: “The #AEC industry is plagued w/ fragmentation &
miscommunication. @openbim & @buildingSMART offer a solution.”

 Creating a Universal Approach to Construction

buildingSMART describes openBIM as a “universal approach” to the collaborative design, realization and operation of buildings based on open standards, such as its IFC family of standards. This approach allows all project members to participate in modeling, regardless of the software tools they use; it creates a common language for widely referenced processes; and it provides one system for housing asset data over its entire life-cycle.

Petrie sees openBIM as a solution to the industry’s fragmentation challenges and buildingSMART as a path to the significant opportunities for improvement in building and infrastructure cost, value and environmental performance.

“I believe those opportunities are only truly available with open international standards and, in order to create those open international standards, a neutral entity for the development and promulgation of those standards is needed,” Petrie explains. “That is the role buildingSMART International is taking on.”

With its newly defined vision, the volunteer-driven organization has made major headway in the past year. From creating new standards to defining data to the harmonization of processes across the supply chain, the group has demonstrated real progress and results.

The Push for Interoperability

The group’s push for progress aligns with demand from several governments. As a case in point: Petrie indicates the UK government’s push for interoperability as an example of where openBIM is heading.

While the UK has had requirements for open data since 2012, in 2016 the government will formally launch a program in which procurements must use BIM Level 2 documents.

This set of methodologies is designed to introduce the construction supply chain to trading and operating in a data environment, allowing the government to focus on the strongest leaders and drive value for its spending programs.

It’s a demand driven not by technology, Petrie says, but a cultural shift resulting from seeing real change in how each construction dollar is spent. “That is the reality that will provide the real driver to ensure that this program moves forward the way we hope it will,” he says.

Petrie adds that thus far the group is achieving its predicted targets in the UK, and work is underway for a Level 3 program slated for 2020-2025.

Tweet: Demand for #BIM L2 is a result of seeing change in how each construction dollar is spent @buildingSMART @3DSAEC #AEC http://ctt.ec/o1bHe+Click to tweet: “Demand for #BIM L2 is a result of
seeing change in how each construction dollar is spent”

The Smart Future of Building

To expand the organization’s work, Petrie is seeking to build a community of experts to ensure that future standards accurately reflect the needs of real-world users. Volunteers work at both the international and chapter level, in an integrated process for developing new standards and deploying them into user communities.

buildingSMART graphic_03.2015

Membership in buildingSMART International is open to companies, government bodies and institutions from around the world. Dassault Systèmes joins buildingSMART as an International Member, with full voting membership rights on the new Standards Committee and membership rights with buildingSMART chapters.

The company joins other leading proponents of openBIM that recognize the benefits from openBIM can achieve the greatest impact and momentum by working together in a common community.

Members benefit from the collective activities of other members locally and internationally, and play an active role not only in identifying issues, but also in the development of solutions.

The nature of buildingSMART is that it is a voluntary organization where solutions are developed on a mutually supportive co-developed basis, and so we need members to be active in our community,” Petrie explains.

Petrie acknowledges that it will take time to develop and communicate the organization’s mission, but, he adds, “The changes that we are hoping will be available as a result of these new standards will not only affect the technical communities, but will have implications for the way in which companies function.

Tweet: Spotlight on @buildingSMART: Driving an open approach to design and #construction evolution @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/dfNk2+Click to tweet this article.

 

Related Resources:

Dassault Systemes Architecture, Engineering and Construction Solutions

buildingSMART website

White Paper: End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3



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