Enhancing Semiconductor Design/Manufacturing Collaboration

By Eric

Whether for a single customer or a larger market, investing in new semiconductor products is a high risk business with the potential for strong profitability, but also significant loss. Mitigating risks in the manufacturing process go a long way in assuring that those business investments are profitable. Risk mitigation can be done through comprehensive automation of the collaboration between engineering to manufacturing.  A number of benefits accrue through automation:

  • Consistent use of best practice know-how
  • Reduction of ECO costs  from best-practice process deviations
  • Enhanced oversight and compliance for material and chemical content reporting
  • Acceleration of product introduction time
  • Faster, lower cost accommodation for unexpected supply chain change decisions

 

This automation requires an integrated approach to configuring and managing the sourcing network as it applies to the IC BOM. The notion of an inverted IC BOM (see figure below) provides a model for defining the steps from which a wafer then is transformed into integrated circuit parts inventory. This becomes especially important when singulated dies find their way into a wide variety of finished goods SKUs.

IC BOM Example

The automation of this process is best done using a configurable rules system and process definition editor that creates hierarchical process that defines the execution of wafer-to-parts transformation. That transformation must not only embody best possible scenario that maximizes profitability, but also be configurable to accommodate unforeseen business and technical factors that require deviation from best business case in order to meet customer commitments. It should also  accommodate corrective workflows for possible process deviation errors.

The rules engine should be able to define the complete sourcing network including fabrication, bumping, singulation, assembly, sorting, testing, marking and inventory storage and shipment. Process managers should be able to create and change these processes without resorting to low-level IT coding support, so as to quickly respond to supply chain issues. The resulting process should also provide up-to-date requirements and test result traceability from NPI to manufacturing. It should include  analytics for flexible, end-user configurable assessment of process performance.

This process engine is then the structure for distributing manufacturing requirements and instructions, collecting test and operational data, creating a single go-to resource for design-to-manufacturing oversight.

Come visit us at the Design Automation Conference in San Francisco next week where our process architects for design-to-manufacturing process coordination will be discussing and demonstrating solutions and best-practices. We’ll be offering a full presentation and demo agenda, a cocktail hour and prizes.

A Tribute to the Engineers of D-Day

By Suzanne

On May 28, PBS featured the documentary “D-Day’s Sunken Secrets” which includes and highlights work done by Dassault Systemes’ Passion for Innovation Institute. Earlier this month Dassault Systèmes, in association with WGBH Boston and the PBS science series NOVA recently hosted “A Tribute to the Engineering Minds of D-Day” at WGBH headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts not far from our headquarters in Waltham.  An audience of more than 200 dignitaries, veterans, Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) leaders and educators attended the event to see and discuss key technological and engineering innovations  used during D-Day and the Invasion of Normandy. The innovations will be featured in the two-hour NOVA production in association with MC4, LCL, Dassault Systèmes and Canopee-CNDP.

As part of  this 70th anniversary of D-Day, Dassault Systèmes’ Passion for Innovation Institute embarked on an ambitious 3D reconstruction project to safeguard blueprints, notes and government documents capturing the remarkable engineering achievements of D-Day. To preserve this valuable moment in history,  Dassault Systèmes created scientific and accurate 3D models of the following  war innovations:

  • The Landing Craft, Vehicle & Personnel (LCVP) designed by American businessman Andrew Jackson Higgins which carried a platoon-sized CK complement of men and weapons to the beaches of Normandy.
  • The Waco CG-4A gliders relatively small, lightweight and maneuverable planes. These silent gliders landed troops in enemy territory during the early hours of the June 6 invasion.
  • The Mulberry Harbor one of the most extraordinary technological feats of WWII. An artificial harbor built in England, it was transported across the English Channel and assembled off the coast at Arromanches to unload the vast quantities of supplies and men that were needed for battle. The Mulberry Harbor was the first temporary deep water facility of its kind ever devised.

During the event the attendees got a “sneak peek” from producer Paula Apsell, Senior Executive Producer, NOVA & Director of the WGBH Science Unit, of highlights from the documentary showing how NOVA as it joins an elite team as they carry out the most extensive survey ever done of the seabed bordering the legendary D-Day beachheads of Normandy, revealing the ingenious technology that helped the Allies overcome the German defenses and ultimately liberate Europe from the Nazis.

Paul Apsell

After a welcome by Sara Larsen, VP North America  Marketing and Communications, the Dassault Systemes Passion for Innovation Team showed attendees a 3D presentation that brought to life through 3D reconstruction, the Mulberry Harbor.

Attendees at D-Day Event

As today, only pieces of the Harbor remain requiring the Dassault Systèmes team to compile what remained of the original plans from the Royal Engineers Museum in London, the construction and maintenance manuals, the aerial photographs taken at the time and additional information provided by Tim Beckett, the son of Mulberry Harbor designer Allan Beckett, himself a marine engineer. Mr. Beckett was a guest of the event and with Nicolas Serikoff of the Dassault Systemes Passion for innovation team narrated a trip through the accurate, scientific 3D reconstruction of the Harbor which enabled him to see and experience his father’s critical work.

Tim Beckett on the Mulberry Harbor

Following the video presentations Paula Apsell, hosted a lively Q&A with some key participants of the project:

  • Doug Hamilton, Director, NOVA’s “D-Day’s Sunken Secrets”
  • Mehdi Tayoubi, Passion for Innovation Institute Director & Experiential Strategy VP for Dassault Systèmes
  • Nicolas Serikoff, D-Day Project Manager, Passion for Innovation Institute, Dassault Systèmes
  • Tim Beckett, Director, Beckett Rankine Marine Engineers & Son of Major Allan Beckett of Britain’s WWII Engineers
  • Sylvain Pascaud, D-Day Expedition Leader

Panel at D-Day event

The audience was thoroughly engaged and if not for the refreshments ready to be served would have gone on for at least another half hour.

During the cocktail reception the attendees were able to get hands on experience with the 3D technology including the recreations of the Mulberry Harbor, Waco Glider and the Higgins LCVB. In its commitment to STEM education a number of attendees were invited to bring their middle and high school children to the event.

Using Z-Space at D-Day Event

D-Day event father daughter

While the technology was engaging even more engaging were the veterans of World War II who were there on D-Day who were invited to attend the event. These veterans were given the “Legion of Honor” award by the French Government, the highest military decoration in France:

  • Mr. Isadore Cutler
  • Mr. Edward Estey
  • Mr. Robert Haley
  • Mr. Richard Pinardi
  • Mr. William Poulios
  • Mr. Harvey Segal
  • Mr. S. Eliot Sklar

Attendees at D-Day Event

Several of the veterans posed with the team from Dassault  Systemes including from left Sara Larsen, Nicolas Serikoff, Marie-Pierre Aulas and Mehdi Tayoubi.

You can see more of the recreations and the project at the Dassault Systemes’ D-Day site.

 

How 3D Printing Is a Revolutionary Sustainable Innovation

By Asheen

3D printingAs a sustainable innovation leader at a technology company, I’m often asked about the implications of recent advances on sustainable innovation. In this article I’ll highlight the potential of 3D printing to revolutionize sustainable innovation.

Three-dimensional printing — or more specifically, additive manufacturing, the term generally used to mean commercial-scale production using 3D printing technologies — is a concept that deserves its geek fandom. But I’d wager that few people have appreciated its revolutionary implications as a sustainable technology. Philosophically, 3D printing is the first technology that has the potential to enable a more biomimetic production model by aligning with one of nature’s fundamental tenets: the tendency to manufacture locally. (These and other deep design principles from nature are collectively known as the practice of biomimicry.)

Why Additive Manufacturing is a Shift

To understand why, consider the difference between how an object is traditionally manufactured and how one is produced additively. Traditional manufacturing methods focus on milling a starting blank — that is, removing material until you’ve achieved the desired shape — or injecting material into a mold. Both types of processes rely on expensive, high-throughput machinery to achieve high economies of scale that minimize costly raw material waste, so such manufacturing is generally performed at a company’s main production facility and then shipped around the world. In an additively manufactured product, in contrast, the product is printed layer by layer, with each cross section stacked on top of the one below it. Since this operation can be performed without huge, high-throughput machinery, it can be performed at hundreds or thousands of remote locations — or millions, if you consider the potential of a 3D printer in every household — with near-zero waste.

This hints at a very interesting shift for commercial product makers: they can focus on designing the best product as the source of their intellectual capital, rather than on how the design can be cheaply manufactured. Imagine, for example, if we could purchase the 3D model of an object we wanted to buy, rather than the object itself, and then download and print it in our home 3D printer. By buying this design from an “app store” of 3D objects rather than a brick-and-mortar shop, and printing it ourselves, we’ve completely eliminated all of the waste of traditional manufacture, as well as 100% of the energy and material normally consumed in transportation and packaging — while enjoying a more custom-tailored and convenient shopping experience.

3D Printing Materials

Sustainable Manufacturing

It’s also worth highlighting the materials that are typically used in a 3D printer — surprisingly, here too we can find a sustainability story. The most common materials used for the printing of plastic parts are acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA). Both are thermoplastics; that is, they become soft and moldable when they’re heated, and return to a more solid state when they’re cooled. ABS is far from environmentally friendly, but PLA is actually a sugar-derived polymer, so it can be made from plants; most commonly, it’s made from corn. (If you’ve ever drunk from a clear plastic cup or used a plastic fork marked “compostable” or “made from corn”, that was PLA.) Provided that we use ecologically sound agricultural practices, we could sustainably grow the feedstock for all of our 3D-printed objects!

The other beautiful thing about thermoplastics is that they can be re-melted and reshaped into new objects several times (though not infinitely, as their structure will eventually depolymerize). That means that when you’re ready to change your toy truck into a toy airplane, you could, in theory, toss it back into the 3D printer to be reshaped into the new object. This gets to one of the biggest sustainability challenges with plastic products today: their end-of-life treatment. Putting plastics into curbside recycling bins seems like an environmentally sound idea (and it’s still better than throwing them into a landfill), but once they’re trucked, sorted, cleaned, and usually commingled with lower-value resins, there’s usually not much economic margin to squeeze out of these recycled plastics — one reason why their rates of recycling are so low. In contrast, putting your pure PLA back into your 3D printer eliminates this whole recycling chain — so we can add “end-of-life impacts” along with transportation and manufacturing waste to our list of eliminated life cycle impacts.

Metals can also be made using an additive manufacturing practice called selective laser sintering (SLS), although these “printers” are much higher-end. Once these become suitable for casual use, it opens up a whole new category of objects that can be built. Although in theory metal is infinitely recyclable (its simpler crystalline structure does not degrade with re-melting), the grinding steps needed to reprocess the used metal into powder suitable for sintering would require a lot more equipment and energy, and would likely prohibit the recycling of 3D-printed metal objects in the same printer – even a direct SLS printer (which uses a single material powder).

At the Doorstep of Future Usages

True radical innovation occurs not from new technologies, but when those new technologies enable newly possible business models. Take, for example, the cool modular mobile phone concept called Phonebloks. Imagine that you want that new, higher-megapixel cell camera block that they refer to… so you just buy and download the new block, toss your old one back in the printer, and print up the new model in PLA with a metal layer with the electronics sintered on — all powered by the solar panels on your roof. Now, we’re starting to approach the manufacturing process used sustainably by nature over the last 3.8 billion years. And someday; your house?

Asheen PhanseyAsheen PHANSEY is Head of the Sustainable Innovation Lab at Dassault Systèmes



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Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.