From a Kid’s Bike to Arc Welding

By Therese

Like many 8-year-old boys, my son spends a lot of his outdoor time riding his bike. He also likes to build things, tear them down, and repaint them. So it really comes as no surprise that his latest hobby is taking old bikes and refurbishing them.

Recently he put his new Schwinn bicycle in the garage and replaced it for what I saw as a rusty three-wheeled green machine bike, fairly new, but severely neglected.  He saw a fast, low-rider that could one day be the coolest bike in the neighborhood. Hmmm . . .was I not looking close enough at his vision? 

My husband took a closer look and pointed out some positives about the hunk of metal before us. Being an expert in the field, so to speak, my husband restores hot-rods and knows the good and bad about machinery. He saw how solid the bike was, with its steel construction and strong perfect welds that join it together.

Grabbing the moment to teach our son new skills, we started talking about bikes and how welds are important to a bike or any steel construction. We talked about how robots are used to make bikes and other complex machines, like heavy machinery, automobiles, and ships.  

My husband explained about welding and how it takes a lot of practice to master it. He started to explain to our son that many metal objects in our lives are welded and that robots are very good for welding. Arc welding things like this by hand could be a very slow and tedious process.

My son didn’t fully understand how a robot could do this (his robot only walks), so we dove into details about what a robot is and how it is programmed to weld. Eureka! He got it.

Speaking the language of computers comes so naturally to kids. Just as quickly as he asked the question, my son turned around to continue working on his bike. He is only 8, after all.

I looked again at the bike and thought about its welds and all the benefits of programming robot arc welds offline, so the real welding robots can keep on with production. I told my husband that robot arc welding can be easily simulated with Dassault Systèmes DELMIA Robotics, validating and optimizing robot programs.

YouTube Preview Image

It can be used to position all workcell components (robot, workpiece, etc.) to ensure that the robot can efficiently and optimally reach all the necessary welds. Strong welds. The kind of welds I want holding my son’s bike together when he zips down the street at “record speeds.”

Learn more about arc welding with The Robot Whisperers.  Or if you’d like information about DELMIA’s solution, please click here.

Best,

Therese




Related Posts

A chat with The Robot Whisperers: IMTS + Arc Welding

One response to “From a Kid’s Bike to Arc Welding”

  1. Kit Goslin says:

    Therese…what a cute story! Great job relating Arc Welding to everyday life.

Leave a Reply

:D :-) :( :o 8O :? 8) :lol: :x :P :oops: :cry: :evil: :twisted: :roll: :wink: :!: :?: :idea: :arrow: :| :mrgreen:
Security Code:

3ds.com

Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.