How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3

By Cedric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

So in the previous article we discovered how eddies in certain conditions can be used with great benefit by the iceberg convoy.

Today, we’ll keep on looking at the technical issue of towing an iceberg, but from a general perspective, that is at the scale of the global trip across the Atlantic Ocean:

  • How many tugs are needed?
  • How powerful do they need to be?
  • How much fuel will they consume?

Will the biggest bollard-pull prove to be the most efficient in economical and ecological terms? Naturally, you might expect that the bigger bollard-pull, the quicker you reach the destination point.

In the case of transporting an iceberg, things are not that simple.

The critical success factor is actually to be able to find the perfect ratio in-between the convoy speed and the relative melt of the iceberg and fuel consumption. Only as such will you be able to minimize the energy spent and reduce the carbon footprint.

The power of simulation allows you to repeat the experience as much as you like, by changing whatever relevant parameter: this is what we did regarding the bollard-pull.

I won’t hold you longer. The simulation results are quite surprising: one tug with 130 ton traction would be sufficient to tow a 7 million ton tabular iceberg – the equivalent of a nutshell next to the ice mountain.

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

How is that possible?

Well, above all, the idea is to harness the power of the prevailing currents to transport the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort”. Please refer to the previous article for an explanation of the principle of assisted drifting.

The only cases where you need to use several tugs (two or three, it varies) are the ones where you need to be able to maneuver with great accuracy and where prevailing currents are not necessary here for you, in other words, the departure and arrival phases of the transportation operation.

Fascinating right? Please feel free to leave a message if you have any questions! :-)

Best,

Cédric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experientialCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.




Related Posts

Watch the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform in action!

How To: Tow an Iceberg Pt. 2

How To: Tow an Iceberg Pt.1

Turning Icebergs into Drinking Water?

10 responses to “How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3”

  1. Remi says:

    By the way, there is this article from the TIME which sums up the whole story pretty well if you want to dig it a bit! :-)
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2071147-1,00.html

  2. Gert Bormans says:

    Hi Cedric
    I am living in Cape Town, South Africa so closer to the South Pole. Is there a difference between North and South pole and the viability (distance, drift, temperature, etc) of such a project?
    Thanks

  3. Cedric says:

    Hi Gert,
    The main difference does come from the location where you would ‘harvest’ the icebergs. For South Africa, the icebergs would be Antarctic ones. The mechanics and physics behind the project would remain the same, proportionally speaking. Keep in mind that according to prevailing winds and currents, earth rotation, practical destinations of iceberg transfer are the west coasts of continents, such as Morocco, Namibia, Western and South Australia, Chili, Peru, California.

  4. Jade says:

    I was moved by iceberg story, it make me learn more aabout passion and dream. we will start China social media promotion, I think it is a good story combine our technology to customer. thanks. jade

  5. crispin says:

    In 1978 I was planning broad development in the Luderitz area of Namibia which included fresh water sources. One futuristic idea was towing icebergs from Antarctica, after reading about the Saudi vision (presumably Georges Mougin’s). I assumed it would be far more viable to tug icebergs WITH our prevailing icy sea and wind currents. How about such a study now?! South Africa and Namibia should be prepared…

  6. Cedric says:

    You’re right, Crispin: today’s knowledge and availaibility of oceano-meteorological data (including prevailing currents) make it possible to simulate and assess the viability of such scenarios. Mougin is currently looking for funding partners and working on his future plans. I guess he is paying a decent attention to South Africa. :-)

  7. fresh water says:

    What will be happened when fresh water pumps in to the ocean? Say 38% of 700t, that will be 200t something….. change sea surface temperature about 1 or 2 degrees or more?

  8. Florent says:

    Hi Cedric,

    I am fascinated by this story, and I want to see the scientific TV documentary about it. But I’m still a student, so I can’t get it directly from this website.
    Do you know a way for me to get it ?

  9. Aurelien says:

    Hi Florent, thanks for your interest. We will contact you privately and ship the IceDream DVD to you.

  10. crispin says:

    Any updates to this dream?

Leave a Reply

:D :-) :( :o 8O :? 8) :lol: :x :P :oops: :cry: :evil: :twisted: :roll: :wink: :!: :?: :idea: :arrow: :| :mrgreen:
Security Code:

3ds.com

Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.