Virtual Archaeology

By Alyssa
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Our world is full of unique art, objects and structures that serve not only cultural icons but also as priceless, irreplaceable parts of history.  But earthquakes, floods, war, time and humans threaten such sites, putting them at risk for harm or even complete elimination.

Thankfully new tools can capture these physical sites in digital form. One company leading this trend for digital preservation is California-based CyArk, a nonprofit organization focused on creating 3D archives of the world’s most precious and at-risk cultural heritage sites for preservation and education.

CyArk trains groups around the world to help identify vulnerable sites and embark on the process of digital preservation.  The technology is small enough to fit into a backpack.  Many of these teams are being trained in war-torn areas such as Syria and Iraq, where there is a significant risk of conflict having an impact on artifacts.

Check out the latest issue of Compass to see examples of some of CyArk’s 200 projects in more than 40 countries across all seven continents.  You’ll also discover what some museums and other organizations are doing to help determine how future generations know and remember past cultures, and how technology like virtual reality headsets are making the content more powerful and more accessible.

What are immersive technology’s future implications for business?

By Alyssa
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By Jason Jerald

In the latest issue of Compass, I wrote a piece summarizing some key points from my book The VR Book: Human-Centered Design for Virtual Reality  and about how immersive virtuality (iV) technology is just now starting to find its value in business. As head-mounted displays come down in cost, any employee will have the tools to virtually teleport themselves anywhere and to work in ways and on projects that are limited only by the imagination.  Clearly, this has the potential to dramatically shift the dynamics of the workplace.

In Compass, I examined some of the most immediate impacts:

  • Experts will be able to easily communicate their work to others. Example: an architect can show clients spaces and vistas that don’t yet exist.
  • As quality hand input is introduced, users can interact in the virtual world: no longer will there be just passive viewing, but instead interactions that are similar to real-world working techniques.
  • Businesses will need to embrace a testing approach to figure out what applications are best suited to their customers’ needs and goals; while the options are nearly limitless, one size does not fit all.

Immersion is a visceral experience that cannot be described or planned with words alone, or even with pictures or video. Only by diving in can you be inspired with a vision for how to adapt the technology for a specific business or application.  Read the full article in Compass now and let me know in the comments section below what you think iV can do for your company.

 

Jason Jerald is Co-Founder & Principal Consultant at NextGen Interactions. He also serves on advisory boards of companies focusing on VR technologies, and is Adjunct Faculty at Duke University and the Waterford Institute of Technology. Jerald has worked on more than 60 VR projects with more than 30 organizations over the past 20 years. He has authored numerous publications, most notably The VR Book: Human-Centered Design for Virtual Reality.

 

All About the 3D Dream Sketcher

By David N.
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The 3D Dream Sketcher is an experience produced by Dassault Systèmes (3DS) with two main objectives:

– Increase online traffic and booth attendance during an event (such as the CES 2016),

– Crowdsource the value of an immersive ideation design tool targeting the general public as well as professional creative designers.

How Does It Work?

Users are asked to think of themselves in an imagined role, and then sketch it in the air. At the beginning of the experience, users are scanned by a pair of kinects so as to create an engaging starting point: their body!
The user sketches for 3.5 minutes while looking through a VR headset and using two hand-held controllers, as the public watches the scene through an external screen.
A 360° bullet-time animated gif is generated and uploaded onto the cloud, and an email containing a link to the gif is sent to the user.
The user can then give it a title, opt to make it public and share it through mail or on most social media.

Here is how it looked when embedded in Dassault Systemes’ website event page for CES 2016:

Dream Sketcher CES Galery
You can access the global gallery of all the sketches created so far here.

The Origins

The experience leverages the recently released HTC Vive Pre VR Headset and controllers along with earlier 3DS projects.
The first project, “Never Blind in VR”, explores how one relates to an immersive live representation of one’s own body. This actually showcased last year at the Laval Virtual Revolution competition.
The second, “BikePics”, examines the impact of augmented selfies shared on social networks. To have a deeper on this 3DXPERIENCE, you can either watch its video of go through this twitter wall.

Marketing Results

The 3D Dream Sketcher welcomed 220 users during the four days of the CES 2016, with impressive results in terms of traffic:

Firstly, it consistently drew throngs of visitors to the booth, proving that VR is a crowd-pleaser that helps brands to engage with captivated audiences.

Dream Sketcher Crowd

The experience also contributed to significantly increasing the number of followers of 3DS digital channels on social media (sorry, but we can’t reveal the actual figure), with around 1,000,000 impressions, mostly through Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.

Dream Sketcher Social Stats


Dream Sketcher Social Stats

Overview of the social campaign results

Outcome for a New Design Solution

This experience has shown us that using a user’s body scan is a good way to circumvent the “blank page syndrome”, while giving the user a better sense of scale and proportion. This is of particular interest for more “serious” applications where sketches are transformed into products or services.

We also received very interesting feedback on how sketching directly in 3D is of particular interest to users who find pen and paper drawing a challenge (it’s so much easier than drawing on paper)

In addition, “social media curation” worked extremely well: having the outcome of the experience sent to a social platform where in two clicks participants could share noteworthy results on social networks. In terms of product ideation research, this may present significant value.

Finally, the experience has shown to be of interest and potentially useful to professional creative designers.

The project is conducted under the 3DEXPERIENCE Lab framework, feeding the ideation theme.
This 3DEXPERIENCE is showcasing Dassault Systèmes’ innovations at several events:
CES2016 (USA)
Laval Virtual 2016 (France)
Design in the age of Experience (Italy)
Future en Seine (France)



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