Closing the Digital Divide

By Alyssa
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According to a recent study by the World Bank, only 19.2% of the people in sub-Saharan Africa and 16.6% of residents of South Asia have internet access, compared with nearly 80% of those in Europe. This dramatic gap is often referred to as the “Digital Divide,” putting developing countries at a distinct disadvantage for economic growth, social mobility and citizen engagement.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: Can Low-Earth-orbit satellites succeed in beaming affordable #internet everywhere? #3DSCompass http://bit.ly/CloDigDiv

Now, however, thanks to advances in technology and the efforts of entrepreneurial risk takers, a number of firms are racing to launch advanced satellite systems that promise to bring broadband internet access – even multichannel video streaming – to parts of the world that still lack such basics as around-the-clock electricity and landline telephones.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: If you provide Wi-Fi access to a lemonade vendor in Africa, can it transform his business? #3DSCompass http://bit.ly/CloDigDiv

A article in the most recent issue of Compass magazine explores several different projects that aim to bridge the digital divide.  These include including OneWeb which plans to ring the Earth with a chain of 648 small satellites that can transmit to simple terminals anywhere on the planet and CMMB Vision, which aims to provide audio, video and internet services at little or no cost in China, India and the Southeast Asia countries.  It also covers Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Internet.org initiative and Google’s Project Loon.  What will such projects mean for citizens, business and government if Internet access becomes more widespread? Come discover more about these innovative projects that aim to provide digital access to every corner of the world.

How Will Automation Change the Job Market?

By Alyssa
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Since the 1970s, automation has eliminated the jobs of millions of bank tellers, retail cashiers, travel agents, airline front-desk workers and manufacturing employees.  As automation becomes more widespread across our world, more jobs such as truck drivers, airline pilots and even medical doctors are now at risk.

Business-FutureofWorkSince the Industrial Revolution began replacing workers with machines in the late 18th century, technology has been changing the nature of work. For every painful job loss, however, the economy generally created one or more new jobs in more advanced industries. Displaced workers had to retrain for the new jobs, but jobs still existed for those willing to learn new skills.

But with today’s cutting-edge technologies – artificial intelligence, robots, automated big data analysis, the Internet of Things, nanotechnology and 3D printing, among others – many experts believe the world is at an important inflection point that may change work so dramatically it will become virtually unrecognizable.

How many jobs are we poised to lose?  Is your job function at risk? What will be the impact on society?  To discover more, “The Future of Work” in the new issue of Dassault Systèmes Compass magazine.

 

#3DXforum – 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM North America in San Francisco

By David G.
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