End of a Space Shuttle Era – What Next?

By Tom
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+
space shuttle endeavour atlantis NASA Dassault Systemes

Photo Credit: NASA/Tom Farrar and Tony Gray.

I think most people will have that nostalgic feeling about the Space Shuttle program and its thirty years of history. It’s had its fair share of ups and downs: from the Columbia and Challenger disasters to the Hubble telescope project success; those moments in time are fixed in our memory.

YouTube Preview Image

So what now? The dramatic images of Atlantis touching down for the last time led most people to ask what NASA and the US space program plan to do next. The good news is they’re already working on something new. :D

Several solutions to replace the space shuttle have been suggested and the most interesting part is that many of these new rockets are from the private industry, rather than a government organization. The majority of the solutions favor an “Apollo style” re-entry capsule. This style of spacecraft will be launched atop a rocket (like the Falcon 9) and land with a splashdown in the ocean.

Abaqus Unified FEA from SIMULIA has the built-in Multiphysics capabilities to successfully predict how that splashdown will happen and the ability to accurately predict physical effects the impact will have on the capsule. Just to prove Abaqus is up to the job – check out this tech brief and video we’ve put together:

YouTube Preview Image

You can also browse for more examples— Tech Briefs, Conference Papers and Customer References— on how SIMULIA’s solutions can solve real-world challenging problems at the SIMULIA Resource Center.

In the words of one very famous spaceman – “To infinity, and beyond!” :wink:

Tom

@3DSTom

3D Goes Crazy @ Futur en Seine Festival

By Brigitte
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+
YouTube Preview Image

We have that festival here in Paris which is so awesome I thought I’d share it with you. It’s called “Futur en Seine” and it’s basically about the general public meeting innovative companies and researchers to imagine together what our future could look like.

Now you may think it’s about witches reading palms. Not quite. Actually we had the pleasure to see people like Yoichiro Kawaguchi whose ambition is to propose artistic but fully realistic 3D models of creatures which would appear in future planets. Of course, it is only predictions and if we won’t be able to check it until we actually visit these planets.

However, and that’s where it gets interesting for us, it is not only arty people who unleash their imagination. Kawagushi is so much into his ideas that he prepared a simulation environment to analyze interactions between the virtual creatures and the planet. Thus he makes sure these creatures can actually live – and thus potentially exist.

Again, it’s pretty far from the traditional scientific methods but when you think about it, art can definitely bring new ideas to engineering. That’s why we were then invited to round tables and seminars to talk about 3D as a media, define eco-design and explain collaborative communication. Topics such as serious gaming or sustainable innovation were of course at the very heart of the debate.

It’s pretty interesting to see how people are passionate about new technologies and their impact on our future: novices and professionals were equally excited by everything they saw! From complex demos from researchers to 3DVIA shows targeting the general public, they were all attracted by 3D and its future.

And you, how do you see our future?

PS: Another thing people loved was Exalead Labs and its Music Mashup! Ok it’s not 3D things but people still loved it! ;-)

Best,

Brigitte

Brigitte Tran Dassault Systemes Brigitte is a member of the Digital Content Strategy Team

How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3

By Cedric
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

So in the previous article we discovered how eddies in certain conditions can be used with great benefit by the iceberg convoy.

Today, we’ll keep on looking at the technical issue of towing an iceberg, but from a general perspective, that is at the scale of the global trip across the Atlantic Ocean:

  • How many tugs are needed?
  • How powerful do they need to be?
  • How much fuel will they consume?

Will the biggest bollard-pull prove to be the most efficient in economical and ecological terms? Naturally, you might expect that the bigger bollard-pull, the quicker you reach the destination point.

In the case of transporting an iceberg, things are not that simple.

The critical success factor is actually to be able to find the perfect ratio in-between the convoy speed and the relative melt of the iceberg and fuel consumption. Only as such will you be able to minimize the energy spent and reduce the carbon footprint.

The power of simulation allows you to repeat the experience as much as you like, by changing whatever relevant parameter: this is what we did regarding the bollard-pull.

I won’t hold you longer. The simulation results are quite surprising: one tug with 130 ton traction would be sufficient to tow a 7 million ton tabular iceberg – the equivalent of a nutshell next to the ice mountain.

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

How is that possible?

Well, above all, the idea is to harness the power of the prevailing currents to transport the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort”. Please refer to the previous article for an explanation of the principle of assisted drifting.

The only cases where you need to use several tugs (two or three, it varies) are the ones where you need to be able to maneuver with great accuracy and where prevailing currents are not necessary here for you, in other words, the departure and arrival phases of the transportation operation.

Fascinating right? Please feel free to leave a message if you have any questions! :-)

Best,

Cédric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experientialCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.



Page 5 of 19« First...34567...10...Last »