I love my Austin Mini and Wacky Races!

By Jonathan
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I’m a big fan of classic cars and motorbikes, I’ve got three altogether. My 1987 Austin Mini is my daily runner and I love it. It’s a bit sick at the moment, so I’ve got to look after it! Luckily for sick Minis there are lots of parts available on numerous websites and always so many friendly people to give you advice.

But don’t worry, I do hire big “modern” cars for holidays; my family appreciates the comfort, luggage capacity and above all the safety…and of course, the geek in me likes the gadgets! But there’s something I do in modern cars that I never do in my old “bangers”… I nearly fall asleep at the wheel!

I’m not saying that modern cars should break down and make squeaky noises like old cars, but what about the emotional experience?

Take, for example, the cool commercial for the Peugeot 208. It’s the Wacky Races!

He even gets Penelope at the end, I can’t believe it!

I loved the Wacky Races as a child (and secretly still do), and knew that Transportation & Mobility was where I wanted to work when I grew up. Peugeot’s commercial is so well done, but it got me thinking, which car would I rather be in? The 208 or one of the Wacky racing cars, well I know for sure which would be more fun!

And that’s just it; modern cars are just not fun anymore (except of course expensive thoroughbred sports cars). Modern cars are much safer, they’re quieter, have better music systems, they are an engineering miracle! But, I feel we’ve lost the pleasure of being mobile. I have more fun being mobile when jogging than driving a modern car down a country lane at 100kph!

Peugeot’s purpose “Motion & Emotion” really speaks to me, it really is that. Jump up and down with joy or sit like a sac when you’re sad. We cannot disconnect our emotions with our motions.

What do you think should happen? Should future mobility be more emotional no matter if we take the train, a car, a bicycle or a tram?

In the mean time I’ll still be keeping my 1987 Austin Mini :wink:

Mobilely yours,
Jonathan

Aerospace Collaboration… in the Cloud, of course!

By Aurelien
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In my previous post from our Farnborough series, I mentioned the CRESCENDO project as an insight into the future of modeling and simulation of digital aircrafts. Now, how about collaboration? Collaboration is indeed key when it comes to complex multi-tier supply chains such as in the Aerospace industry. And in order to get a single source of truth, cloud-based collaboration is a must. For that matter, BoostAeroSpace is another great European project fostering cloud-based collaboration for the Aerospace industry (you can also follow @BoostAeroSpace).

Better than any amount of words, check out the video below to see what we mean by a Collaborative 3D Experience in the Aerospace industry, from the passenger experience to the airline operator and to the aircraft manufacturer. All of it happening in the cloud, of course ;)

YouTube Preview Image

What do you think? Wouldn’t it be awesome if a wish you’d share in an online community would turn into reality in the next manufactured aircraft?


CRESCENDO: tuning up the Behavioural Digital Aircraft

By Aurelien
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Following up my previous post from Farnborough, I would like to further the focus on the passenger experience as an important trend of the future of the Aerospace industry. Now think about it: what could you experience with anything that is static? Not much, really. Any experience in real life involves interaction, and feedback on how your surroundings BEHAVE with respect to your interaction.

Well, it goes the same when it comes to virtual universes. A couple decades ago, a 3D Digital-Mockup (3D DMU) was fine to see how the whole product (say an aircraft in that case) would look like, yet that was pretty much static. Of course, virtual simulation (especially materials resistance) could be performed as well, but the processes were not really tied together. In order to get a holistic understanding of the behavior of an aircraft, you need to be able to design and simulate at the same time.

This combination is exactly the scope of a large European project, called “Collaborative & Robust Engineering using Simulation Capability Enabling Next Design Optimisation” aka CRESCENDO (now THAT’s what I call an acronym :o ). The project, coordinated by Airbus, gathers 59 partners (companies, research centers, universities — see the full list below) accross 13 countries to develop what Behavioural Digital Aircraft (BDA).

BDA focuses in particular on the following use cases:

  • Thermal Aircraft addresses the challenges of increasingly hotter equipments (e.g. electronics equipements, hot air exhausts), from the simulation of those equipments up to the global thermal trade-offs at the whole aircraft level
  • Powerplant Integration is a multi-disciplinary approach of the thermal and structural challenges of the propulsion engines
  • Energy Aircraft is about energy systems engineering from the preliminary tests up to final certification

If you’re interested in knowing more about CRESCENDO, check this out.

Many thanks to Delphine Zinck, A&D Industry Solution Experience Specialist, who let me know about this on-going project! :)



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