Improving the Reliability of Consumer Electronics Products Through Realistic Simulation

By Harish

Realistic simulation for Electronic products

Early product failures and product recalls are very costly. They result in loss of revenue, litigation, and brand devaluation among others. Hardware recalls are often costlier than software recalls as software patches can be easily downloaded and installed once flaws come to light. But recalls and early product failures tend to happen over and over again. Why? Because engineering teams are constantly under the gun to improve product performance, reduce form factors, and reduce time to market, all while cutting costs. In order to mitigate risk engineers need to develop a deeper understanding of the product behavior under real operating conditions and quickly evaluate design trade-offs based on overall system behavior.

Physical tests provide an excellent means to understand product behavior. However, physical testing is expensive and time consuming. Simulation provides a cheaper and faster alternative to physical tests. It is critical to strike the right balance between physical tests and simulation during product development. In order to get the maximum bang for your buck, simulations should be deployed starting early in the design cycle when physical prototypes are not available and the design is not fully developed. The earlier you find flaws, the earlier you can fix them. Since the cost of fixing flaws grows exponentially through the design cycle (figure below), identifying and fixing design flaws early in the design cycle is super critical.

Relative Cost of fixing errors in embedded Systems

Relative cost of fixing errors in embedded systems

Not all simulation tools are created equal. You don’t need any answer. You need the right answer. For that, you need simulation tools that most closely depict reality. And you need answers fast. Hence you need product testing and validation tools with industry leading physics and solver technology to obtain accurate solutions faster in order to help you improve product design, ensure product reliability and reduce time to market. Accurate depiction of material behavior and physics of failure are essential to obtaining realistic results. Such capabilities are critical in predicting the behavior of materials such as glass, adhesives, and polymers that have high propensity for damage.

Consumer electronic products, especially mobile and portable devices such as smartphones, tablets and laptops, are subjected to a variety of operating conditions. The devices need to be designed to protect them from damage. Engineers need to ensure that “portable” doesn’t mean “breakable.”

Tablet drop

The challenge is to design a light-weight product that can withstand not just the loading cycles associated with regular usage, but also abusive loading scenarios that are encountered less frequently (According to surveys and insurance claim statistics, drop and water damage constitute the two most frequent causes of damage for mobile devices.). Simulation should be employed at the ideation, product development, and failure analysis stages in order to improve product quality and reduce time to market. Refer to this  case study to learn how a leading manufacturer of consumer electronics used simulation to improve the keystroke feel and to enhance frame rigidity while reducing weight .

Tablet drop simulation

While drop during daily usage is a concern for mobile devices, transportation drops are the main concern for office equipment. The engineers are faced with the challenge of identifying the structural members that are most susceptible to damage and to improve their damage resistance while reducing the overall weight of the structure. Refer to the ebook below to know how a leading manufacturer of office equipment designed a low cost printer that can withstand a series of transportation drop tests.

The examples above provide a snapshot of applications leveraging SIMULIA Abaqus technology   to successfully improve product durability while satisfying other constraints such as weight and cost.

More example related to  how engineering teams are using virtual testing to predict stresses, optimize design performance and reduce time to market can be read in  this ebook .

How can technology shape the future?

By Alyssa

How can technology shape the future? That is the question at the heart of a new3-part series developed by Dassault Systèmes. While the stories are distinct, they contain an underlying theme of how innovative 3DEXPERIENCEs can impact humankind. In the next few weeks we will introduce you to each story in depth.

The Living Heart Project

You will learn about how 3D modeling is giving researchers a revolutionary and comprehensive look into the human heart. Can this help reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease as a leading cause of death in humans? Will our medical treatment be able to become more personalized to our unique situation?

Living Heart

Performance Sports Apparel

Another segment focuses on advances in performance sports apparel. Will we soon expect that every piece of our athletic gear will be easily customized to improve performance and comfort? Will this create a world where blisters from running will be a thing of the past?

Sports apparel

Sustainable Cities

In the final segment, you’ll get a glimpse into the direction that urban planners are quickly moving to in order to quickly and sustainably develop cities to meet the needs of rising populations while keeping in mind the impact on the population and the environment.

Sustainable cities

Over the next few months, we will reveal each of these stories to you through videos, infographics and news articles.

For now, we invite you to let your imagination take flight by giving 60 seconds to view our new commercial that gives a glimpse into Dassault Systèmes vision for the future and how 3DEXPERIENCES can shape our lives. Watching TV? Look for the spot through July 31st on BBC World News!

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Enhancing Semiconductor Design/Manufacturing Collaboration

By Eric

Whether for a single customer or a larger market, investing in new semiconductor products is a high risk business with the potential for strong profitability, but also significant loss. Mitigating risks in the manufacturing process go a long way in assuring that those business investments are profitable. Risk mitigation can be done through comprehensive automation of the collaboration between engineering to manufacturing.  A number of benefits accrue through automation:

  • Consistent use of best practice know-how
  • Reduction of ECO costs  from best-practice process deviations
  • Enhanced oversight and compliance for material and chemical content reporting
  • Acceleration of product introduction time
  • Faster, lower cost accommodation for unexpected supply chain change decisions

 

This automation requires an integrated approach to configuring and managing the sourcing network as it applies to the IC BOM. The notion of an inverted IC BOM (see figure below) provides a model for defining the steps from which a wafer then is transformed into integrated circuit parts inventory. This becomes especially important when singulated dies find their way into a wide variety of finished goods SKUs.

IC BOM Example

The automation of this process is best done using a configurable rules system and process definition editor that creates hierarchical process that defines the execution of wafer-to-parts transformation. That transformation must not only embody best possible scenario that maximizes profitability, but also be configurable to accommodate unforeseen business and technical factors that require deviation from best business case in order to meet customer commitments. It should also  accommodate corrective workflows for possible process deviation errors.

The rules engine should be able to define the complete sourcing network including fabrication, bumping, singulation, assembly, sorting, testing, marking and inventory storage and shipment. Process managers should be able to create and change these processes without resorting to low-level IT coding support, so as to quickly respond to supply chain issues. The resulting process should also provide up-to-date requirements and test result traceability from NPI to manufacturing. It should include  analytics for flexible, end-user configurable assessment of process performance.

This process engine is then the structure for distributing manufacturing requirements and instructions, collecting test and operational data, creating a single go-to resource for design-to-manufacturing oversight.

Come visit us at the Design Automation Conference in San Francisco next week where our process architects for design-to-manufacturing process coordination will be discussing and demonstrating solutions and best-practices. We’ll be offering a full presentation and demo agenda, a cocktail hour and prizes.



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Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.