How can technology shape the future?

By Alyssa

How can technology shape the future? That is the question at the heart of a new3-part series developed by Dassault Systèmes. While the stories are distinct, they contain an underlying theme of how innovative 3DEXPERIENCEs can impact humankind. In the next few weeks we will introduce you to each story in depth.

The Living Heart Project

You will learn about how 3D modeling is giving researchers a revolutionary and comprehensive look into the human heart. Can this help reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease as a leading cause of death in humans? Will our medical treatment be able to become more personalized to our unique situation?

Living Heart

Performance Sports Apparel

Another segment focuses on advances in performance sports apparel. Will we soon expect that every piece of our athletic gear will be easily customized to improve performance and comfort? Will this create a world where blisters from running will be a thing of the past?

Sports apparel

Sustainable Cities

In the final segment, you’ll get a glimpse into the direction that urban planners are quickly moving to in order to quickly and sustainably develop cities to meet the needs of rising populations while keeping in mind the impact on the population and the environment.

Sustainable cities

Through the end of July, we will reveal each of these stories to you through videos, infographics and news articles.

For now, we invite you to let your imagination take flight by giving 60 seconds to view our new commercial that gives a glimpse into Dassault Systèmes vision for the future and how 3DEXPERIENCES can shape our lives. Watching TV? Look for the spot through July 31st on BBC World News!

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Enhancing Semiconductor Design/Manufacturing Collaboration

By Eric

Whether for a single customer or a larger market, investing in new semiconductor products is a high risk business with the potential for strong profitability, but also significant loss. Mitigating risks in the manufacturing process go a long way in assuring that those business investments are profitable. Risk mitigation can be done through comprehensive automation of the collaboration between engineering to manufacturing.  A number of benefits accrue through automation:

  • Consistent use of best practice know-how
  • Reduction of ECO costs  from best-practice process deviations
  • Enhanced oversight and compliance for material and chemical content reporting
  • Acceleration of product introduction time
  • Faster, lower cost accommodation for unexpected supply chain change decisions

 

This automation requires an integrated approach to configuring and managing the sourcing network as it applies to the IC BOM. The notion of an inverted IC BOM (see figure below) provides a model for defining the steps from which a wafer then is transformed into integrated circuit parts inventory. This becomes especially important when singulated dies find their way into a wide variety of finished goods SKUs.

IC BOM Example

The automation of this process is best done using a configurable rules system and process definition editor that creates hierarchical process that defines the execution of wafer-to-parts transformation. That transformation must not only embody best possible scenario that maximizes profitability, but also be configurable to accommodate unforeseen business and technical factors that require deviation from best business case in order to meet customer commitments. It should also  accommodate corrective workflows for possible process deviation errors.

The rules engine should be able to define the complete sourcing network including fabrication, bumping, singulation, assembly, sorting, testing, marking and inventory storage and shipment. Process managers should be able to create and change these processes without resorting to low-level IT coding support, so as to quickly respond to supply chain issues. The resulting process should also provide up-to-date requirements and test result traceability from NPI to manufacturing. It should include  analytics for flexible, end-user configurable assessment of process performance.

This process engine is then the structure for distributing manufacturing requirements and instructions, collecting test and operational data, creating a single go-to resource for design-to-manufacturing oversight.

Come visit us at the Design Automation Conference in San Francisco next week where our process architects for design-to-manufacturing process coordination will be discussing and demonstrating solutions and best-practices. We’ll be offering a full presentation and demo agenda, a cocktail hour and prizes.

Design Collaboration – What do we gain with integrated Design Analysis

By Eric

High-Tech IndustryEven from the early days of chip design the different tasks involved from architecture, logic design, layout and verification were accomplished in most part as individual efforts. The considerations of the “other disciplines” most of the time were not part of the equation in accomplishing ones task. “Once the logic design is done the back-end person can figure out how best to implement the layout”. When chip complexity and size were not so great we could get away with this kind of approach.

Today with large scale SOC designs and aggressive design targets, sophisticated nm technologies and schedules, this can no longer be the norm. More and more design tasks are being parallelized to compress design schedules. Design teams are much larger and can be located in different parts of the planet. The complex silicon technologies require deeper, more time consuming analysis of an increased list of parasitic effects such as cross-talk, inductive and capacitive coupling, junction leakage, etc. to achieve functional, performance and power design targets. In addition, sophisticated design tools produce volumes of analysis data over hundreds of modes and corners for each design flow step in the implementation process which allow engineers to evaluate if the design is converging toward budget targets.

So how can we manage this torrential flow of data in a way that keeps us on track and meet aggressive schedules? We need the ability to collect all this data from all project instances consistently from each design step, where ever it is produced, to a centralized location. The data needs to be organized in a way that allows review in a systematic approach from a project level to detailed issue presentation. The hundreds of analysis corners that may be generated for each flow step covering different process and operating conditions should be captured and organized for quick review. Important key metrics need to be displayed and highlighted making it possible to to make decisions where to focus first. As shown in Figure 1 below, the system should allow all aspects of the analysis data to be viewed in context (such as timing, layout, power, congestion, etc.) to see how different metrics could be contributing to specific issues. Historical data collected by such a system can then be compared by various analysis capabilities (tables, plots, metric aggregation, views) to assess metric trends and determine if the design is converging to expected targets. The system would enhance the ability to weed out non-issues from “project-critical” issues, allowing focus on key resolutions for the next pass of implementation. Finally, the system should help in constructing the current status and progress of the design and highlight problematic blocks that need further attention.

Figure 1

This integrated system would be useless without the ability to share the organized database with others to collaborate on issues, resolutions and trends as the design matures to completion. A centralized database where all team members can view the same picture of issues allows better decisions to be made and help with communication between disciplines (i.e. front-end and back-end).

With the ability to collect data from anywhere at any stage the flow, automatically keep track of design progress and analyze issues from an integrated view the prospect of meeting or bringing in schedules for these complex SOC design projects becomes more attainable.

Also, we’re going to be at the Design Automation Conference in San Francisco this year again. We will have a full presentation and demo agenda, a cocktail hour and prizes, join us!



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