How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3

By Cedric
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

So in the previous article we discovered how eddies in certain conditions can be used with great benefit by the iceberg convoy.

Today, we’ll keep on looking at the technical issue of towing an iceberg, but from a general perspective, that is at the scale of the global trip across the Atlantic Ocean:

  • How many tugs are needed?
  • How powerful do they need to be?
  • How much fuel will they consume?

Will the biggest bollard-pull prove to be the most efficient in economical and ecological terms? Naturally, you might expect that the bigger bollard-pull, the quicker you reach the destination point.

In the case of transporting an iceberg, things are not that simple.

The critical success factor is actually to be able to find the perfect ratio in-between the convoy speed and the relative melt of the iceberg and fuel consumption. Only as such will you be able to minimize the energy spent and reduce the carbon footprint.

The power of simulation allows you to repeat the experience as much as you like, by changing whatever relevant parameter: this is what we did regarding the bollard-pull.

I won’t hold you longer. The simulation results are quite surprising: one tug with 130 ton traction would be sufficient to tow a 7 million ton tabular iceberg – the equivalent of a nutshell next to the ice mountain.

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

How is that possible?

Well, above all, the idea is to harness the power of the prevailing currents to transport the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort”. Please refer to the previous article for an explanation of the principle of assisted drifting.

The only cases where you need to use several tugs (two or three, it varies) are the ones where you need to be able to maneuver with great accuracy and where prevailing currents are not necessary here for you, in other words, the departure and arrival phases of the transportation operation.

Fascinating right? Please feel free to leave a message if you have any questions! :-)

Best,

Cédric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experientialCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.

How To: Tow an Iceberg Pt. 2

By Cedric
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

towing tow pulling pull icebergs ice dream 3DS Dassault Systèmes Systemes System CAD CATIA SIMULIA DELMIA ENOVIA Draftsight exalead drifting model 3dvia intercim enguinity PLM 2.0 3D experience sea experiential eddy eddies giant

The ultimate benefit of digital simulation is being able to manipulate each and every parameter for a given issue: this is what we did for the travel of the iceberg. The transportation operation could be repeated as often as necessary by fiddling with the relevant parameters.

Considerable progress has been made in meteorology and oceanography. Forecasts have been available, providing detailed information about currents and their temperature, speed, eddies or whatever weather and sea conditions.

This vital information makes it possible to optimize towing operations, taking advantage of favourable conditions or, conversely, avoiding unfavourable ones.

Indeed, it is pointless for the iceberg convoy to try and take on natural forces if these are too overpowering. It only leads to increased fuel consumption. When your objective is  to provide water at a lower price and with a reduced carbon footprint, it is for sure not the right way to go!

Let me give you one very concrete example. Can you imagine a giant eddy, 200km wide or more? Basically, two drastically different situations can happen when the convoy meets one:
towing tow pulling pull icebergs ice dream 3DS Dassault Systèmes Systemes System CAD CATIA SIMULIA DELMIA ENOVIA Draftsight exalead drifting model 3dvia intercim enguinity PLM 2.0 3D experience sea experiential

  1. Either the eddy takes you to the right direction with respect to the final destination. As such, the convoy clearly benefits from its power.
  2. Or, the eddy takes you to a direction you don’t want to go. In such case, it is useless for the boat to try and struggle against the eddy force.

That’s where the simulation comes in handy: it teaches you what the most appropriate steering strategy is for each situation encountered on the convoy’s route, and in the case of eddies, how to leverage them.

This was actually one of Mougin’s key ideas we had to check: the assisted drift approach, which works by exploiting the iceberg’s natural drift and the prevailing currents!

Harnessing the power of the prevailing currents means transporting the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort, as if the water had become one enormous conveyor belt.

The engineering team used real data of a reference year to build the drifiting simulation: that way, they were able to observe and analyze as many phenomena as possible, including eddies and the way they could be exploited to save significant time and fuel.

What does this mean? Less time and less energy consumed, that is less money spent… and cheaper water!

Best,

Cédric

towing tow pulling pull icebergs ice dream 3DS Dassault Systèmes Systemes System CAD CATIA SIMULIA DELMIA ENOVIA Draftsight exalead drifting model 3dvia intercim enguinity PLM 2.0 3D experience sea experiential cedric simardCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.

How To: Tow an Iceberg Pt.1

By Cedric
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Georges Mougin tow iceberg newfoundland canada canary islands tugs 3DS dassault systèmes

I’ve already talked about it earlier (here): Georges Mougin has this crazy idea of bringing back an iceberg from Newfoundland, Canada to the Canary Islands. It would then provide fresh water to local people for much less money.

This is such a vast topic it would take ages (and very specific knowledge) to discuss it all. So I decided I would cover something easy, fun and surprising. Very surprising actually… ;)

Indeed, one of their main challenges was to test Mougin’s idea and its feasibility:

  • How many tugs would be needed?
  • How powerful would they need to be?
  • How much fuel would they consume?
  • In how much time?
  • Which route should they follow?
  • What time of the year?
  • What steering strategies would be appropriate?

In just a few clicks using CATIA Systems software, the 3DS team could enter the GPS coordinates corresponding to the starting location for the iceberg off Newfoundland (37°N, 15°30’W) and the end destination (the Canary Islands), choose a departure date for the convoy (say 3 February) and the number of tugs required to tow the iceberg, as well as their power (two tugs with 130 tonne traction for example), and even select the general steering strategy that would be adopted by the captain in real life (“full power towards its final destination”).

It is then possible to observe what happens at any instant, and analyse the causes and effects produced by the various parameters. The team eventually finalised an integrated drift model, designed to consolidate all criteria involved in the iceberg transportation operation, among them:Georges mougin ice dream iceberg tow tug newfoundland canada canary islands dassault systèmes

  • Meteorological and oceanographic data (sea currents, swell, winds, etc.) that the convoy could be subjected to at any time and in any location, and the impact of such data on its journey.
  • Physical phenomena, regardless of their complexity: the general drift of the iceberg and the convoy under the effect of the various natural forces (winds, currents, swell, etc.), the traction force generated by the tug and the resulting fuel consumption, the application of the phenomena of air and water drag with the iceberg and the tug, the Earth’s rotation, etc.

During the following posts, you will be surprised with the simulation results as they’re not what you could expect them to be. Stay tuned! ;-)

Best,

Cédric

cédric simard dassault systèmes 3DSCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.



Page 10 of 25« First...89101112...20...Last »