ENOVIA with SOLIDWORKS User Meetings at SOLIDWORKS World 2016

By Matthew
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Are you attending SOLIDWORKS World 2016 in Texas?  If “yes” then you should also register HERE to join our two-part lunch-and-learn ENOVIA with SOLIDWORKS User Group Meeting that will take place at SOLIDWORKS World 2016 in Dallas!

Check out this video to hear what our 2015 attendees shared about the value of participating in ENOVIA User Group Meetings and communities:

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If you have SOLIDWORKS – plus EPDM, ENOVIA, SmarTeam or other – you are invited to join SOLIDWORKS World 2016your professional peers and the extended team of experts to:

  • Consider the needs of your business – today and tomorrow
  • Discover more about data-driven apps for SOLIDWORKS users and the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform
  • Learn the latest paths and proven methods for launching your journey:
    • Coexistence3DEXPERIENCE Compass
    • Migration
  • Gain insight and best practices from the experience of  real client testimonials
  • Participate in collaborative discussion

Register today for this 2-day, fee-free meeting…and will include a free lunch.

Click HERE to register

Hey…who can say no to free food?  :lol:

Matthew J. Hall

Matthew J. Hall

Matthew Hall is the ENOVIA User Advocacy & Social EXPERIENCE Specialist.  You can find him on Twitter at @mjhall. Connect with ENOVIA at @3DSENOVIA

INFRASTRUCTURE EFFICIENCY: SMEDI’s Civil Engineering BIM Simplifies Project Complexity

By Akio
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Originally published in Compass Magazine. Written by JWDK.


clicktotweet

Click to Tweet: “SMEDI uses #BIM to
simplify #civilengineering projects”

Shanghai Puxi section of the Ring Road project in China (Image © SMEDI)

Shanghai Puxi section of the Ring Road project in China (Image © SMEDI)


The Shanghai Municipal Engineering Design Institute (SMEDI), one of China’s top municipal engineering companies, has completed 12,000 projects including water treatment plants, as well as road, bridge, rail, urban landscape, fuel gas and geotechnical engineering projects.

Compass spoke with Lv Wei Zhang, association chief engineer in SMEDI’s IT Center, and Junwei Wu, deputy director of SMEDI’s BIM Center, about their work to develop IT solutions for civil engineering’s unique challenges.


RELATED: Civil Design Innovation, a whitepaper by Dassault Systèmes and SMEDI


COMPASS: What challenges are SMEDI facing in executing its work?

LV WEI ZHANG: In China, it is common for major infrastructure projects to be carried out with design and construction happening in parallel. Typically, only 50% of the project is designed when construction begins. During construction, owners are able to plan the rest of the project with greater precision. So they modify their design as the project evolves. This is one of the ways to adjust projects.

This process is close to owners but very difficult for the designers. To succeed, we must be able to clearly visualize the outcome of our design to ensure both quality and efficiency. With an advanced Building Information Modeling (BIM) platform, we can improve communication between owners, make design changes with great flexibility, manage project status with precision and efficiency and recover from project delays effectively.

Before employing the advanced BIM platform, what difficulties did you encounter in your work?

LWZ: In the past, our contractors used the in-situ casting method quite extensively, with a lot of casting work happening at the site. This had numerous drawbacks. First, it was difficult to control material waste. Second, it was hard to manage cost. Third, managing time and schedule was a big challenge. Last, casting on-site occupied much more space than prefabrication would require, so other contractors were often blocked from their work sites for prolonged periods.

How did you solve this challenge?

LWZ: First of all, we fully integrated our work into an engineering procurement construction (EPC) system that provides an overview of engineering, procurement and construction and how they relate to one another. We did off-site prefabrication as much as possible, and we launched a BIM system, which significantly enhances overall efficiency.

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “SMEDI adopted an EPC system, prefabrication
& #BIM system to gain efficiencies on #civil projects”

What are the benefits of BIM?

LWZ: On the one hand, BIM enables us to achieve collaborative 3D design. The designs, from the macro system to the micro parts, are displayed as 3D visuals, giving clarity and precision in the process of communication with all stakeholders. BIM also facilitates data communication in an industry standardized format, so that everyone sees the same information clearly.

Could you briefly describe your application of BIM?

JUNWEI WU: Starting in 2005, the civil engineering industry in China has been shifting from CAD to BIM, and we started using BIM in our design work at that time. Before that, we had to endure the shortcomings of 2D design. The modifications were not linked together. In other words, changing one drawing did not automatically trigger changes in the other drawings. With BIM, a change to one area alerts the designer to any related areas that need to change as well.

BIM was first used in our water treatment plants, but ordinary BIM does not always have adequate capability to handle roads and bridges. We worked with our supplier to develop a BIM specifically for civil engineering that is perfect for visualizing roads, bridges and tunnels. It can demonstrate our design concepts and offers precision in our presentation, even for minor features.

Could you give some examples?

JW: SMEDI is particularly strong in designing bridges. For instance, the Ganjiang River Second Bridge, in Jiangxi Province, has a “fish-like” design that merges very well with the landscape. The structure is complicated, with the steel above, concrete below, and a mixture of both in the middle. We used our specialized civil engineering BIM, enabling well-planned division of work, with different engineers deployed collaboratively for components, the skeleton and the steel structure.

With our civil engineering BIM, it has become much easier for us to accommodate changes in design, which can be frequent. In the past, making changes to the design often took even longer than the designing itself.

Now, the pain of endless modifications is significantly reduced.

Another notable example is the Yanggao South Road Tunnel project in Shanghai, a project involving many tunnels and bridges. Our BIM made design much more precise and easier to visualize.

What is your overall evaluation of the civil engineering BIM solution that your partner developed, based on your input?

JW: We have immensely benefited from this platform. Our partner has long been number one in the field of manufacturing, and we foresee that “manufacturing today is the civil works of tomorrow.”

clicktotweetClick to Tweet: “Manufacturing today
is the #civil works of tomorrow”

Furthermore, the platform has saved a significant amount of our time. Before this platform, we spent about one-third of our time doing design work and two-thirds of our time doing communication.

Apart from facilitating our design work, BIM makes communication much faster and easier, and this translates into substantial cost savings.

Our BIM platform is specially designed to effectively solve civil design industry challenges. We believe this platform is simultaneously mature and innovative.


Related Resources

Civil Design for Fabrication

Whitepaper: Civil Design Innovation

Civil Infrastructure Whitepaper by 3DS


Smarter Solutions for Smarter Ideation

By Estelle
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An Interview with Anne Asensio, VP Design Experience at Dassault Systèmes

This Article has been written by Teshia Treuhaft and originally appeared at Core 77

 

While the terms ‘internet of things,’ ‘smart objects’ and ‘connected devices’ seem to be regularly splashed across the pages of newspapers, design briefs, crowdfunding campaigns and conference topics—relatively little is discussed about what tools designers need in order to design smart devices.

Some startups and corporate departments are beginning to understand how the inclusion of technology in our everyday lives is changing us. With this realization comes changing demands for product teams looking to innovate. This usually includes designers working alongside engineers and software developers, oftentimes with a new set of tools to match. Among the tools already available to designers, many of the emerging industry standards have come from Dassault Systèmes. Dassault Systèmes has long recognized the cross disciplinary needs of designers and responded with several solutions, allowing for the creation of holistic design experiences, not just products.

As product teams become more interdisciplinary, the process for creating products has expanded to include engineers, scientists, developers and many more key players. As the requirements of designing change—so does the process of design thinking, adapting to what Dassault Systèmes has named ‘Social Ideation.’ Social Ideation is the method by which the iterative process is expanded beyond just including designers. Each phase of ideation can be visualized for not just the design-savvy, but for all members of an interdisciplinary team.

To make tools for social ideation not only work, but work fast, precise and for team members with different competencies is a big task. To understand what is needed, we asked someone who has been linking design methodologies and fostering collaboration in multidisciplinary teams for years, Anne Asensio. Asensio, came from General Motors and Renault to join Dassault Systèmes in 2007 as Vice President of Design Experience. She sat down to share her view on the need for social ideation across disciplines and the new responsibilities of designers in the next generations.

Anne Asensio, VP Design Experience at Dassault Systèmes

Core77: Is the consumer expectation for experience over product a recent occurrence?

Anne Asensio: This is something we have seen coming from quite some time. People have always been interested in this notion of experience because it’s part of our lives, but now when we are talking about the experience it’s because I think that we have passed the time for just producing products for functional aspects of life in the new economy. We must begin looking at a much higher level of expectation.

The digital effect is that everything is now contextualized. Digital devices with the capacity to be customized and configured can now become a little personal space that you can immerse yourself into anytime you want. It delivers this notion of being part of that moment and that’s a different expectation in terms of experience. What we are seeing is an accelerated view of the natural evolution of human experience due to the digital devices that are transforming our lives.

What kinds of tools are necessary to design these experiences?

What I am personally interested in is design experience. You might ask what the difference is between design experience and experience design. In experience design we have seen an incredible expansion of design methodologies and practices in the area of digital design. The act of just designing through screen-based software is necessary for designers to do the work they needed to do—that is, to humanize the relationship between man and technology.

But I believe that the world of design is not just to help humanize the evolution of technology—I believe we have a particular aim, which is to question where we are going on a broader level, to create designed experiences. To do this we have to bring meaning and question the type of experience we are providing. Especially now that technology gives us the total liberty and expertise to do anything, bringing with it a high level of responsibility.

“We have seen an incredible expansion of design methodologies and practices in the area of digital design” says Asensio.

So has the designer’s role in multidisciplinary teams changed?

Designers have always been serving this function: acting as a contributor among a multidisciplinary team while bringing their own perspective. But today, designers help everyone visualize what they are doing collaboratively in order to make decisions—that is quite new. What the new tools are doing is enabling two aspects: the capability to not only design, but also to represent and the ability to see what others are doing in order to help them reduce risk and uncertainty.

This is absolutely critical when it comes to making decisions about new products because it helps people embrace disruptive innovation—not because they are coming up with better ideas—but by allowing for synthesis. Now you can combine the capabilities of teams into a physical or virtual medium and share progress throughout the whole process. This model can be continuously transformed—it can keep being changed. You have the perfect subject to apply the typical design methodology of iterations—test, fail, change, and do it again.

What are the big challenges facing multidisciplinary teams?

I don’t know if I would say challenges or opportunities. The fact is, what you see is a convergence of digital technology and a convergence of very interesting capacities that are coming from different industries. For Dassault Systèmes, we come from the formalization of the product and we extend it with physics, simulation all the way to imaginaries and meanings. to reach the point where we can embrace more team members in the process and get something very complex to be seen, interacted with and visualized.

What is really key is that wherever you come from, whatever meaning you are looking for, we want to allow anyone the ability to deliver their vision of the future. That is very important because right now, team members can be accused of not being transparent, and I can see a way in which everyone will have a stake in the way we are designing the world.

“We are not at a moment where desginers need to return to their capacity to project ideas, both imaginary and visionary” says Asensio. 

You mean they will have a stake in it because anyone can have the tools?

All of those capacities that were designed and developed in a particular area of application—be it manufacturing, design, science, entertainment etc.—are now merging. That convergence, we see today in the Internet of Things. All those aspects are just something we are visualizing today—it’s a way to see what’s happening, and react.

I believe that today we are looking at something more forward thinking, more visionary. Basically asking: we have these capabilities, but where do we start? How should we be innovating and why? What would be the best way of innovating, embracing some questions that are more on the social and not just the technical side. Answers are not going to only be found on the technical side.

What abilities does the next generation of young designers need to help find those answers?

We were designers before the industrial era. Everyone was a craftsman or artisan with the ability to make a beautiful, signature object. The industrial era then put the designers into a different situation—they must humanize. Some designers were able to push to the level of questioning, in a critical manner, how the objects produced by the industry were affecting our society, our lives, our ethical approach of living our condition as humans. Now that era is done. We are now at a moment where designers need to return to their capacity to project ideas both imaginary and visionary.

That leads me to believe that young designers need to not only establish themselves in their role of humanizing technology but critically question what is happening. It’s no longer what you’re going to be doing—but what you’re going to be. Period.

Thanks to Anne Asensio for speaking with us. To read more about Dassault Systèmes Solutions and Social Ideation & Creative Design, check out their website



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