Top 10 Tips for a Successful PLM Implementation

By Wendy

What every company should consider to ensure a successful PLM implementation

After hundreds of successful PLM implementations, Dassault Systèmes Industry Services (DSIS) has developed the methodologies and best practices that ensure quick, high levels of return on its customers’ investments.

Here is their Top 10 list for a world-class PLM implementation:Consulting services

  1. Involve a true PLM expert early to assess your PLM maturity and gain efficiency on your processes, define an accurate vision, and focus your company’s business goals and initiatives for a targeted return. A DS PLM expert who has been involved in your project from the outset will understand your goals and priorities, allowing faster issue resolution with better results. Engaging someone only after you discover issues creates delays and delivers sub-optimal results.
  2. Assess IT infrastructure readiness. Is it robust enough? Is it scalable? For a large Version 6 implementation, planning for hardware performance, capacity and scalability is key to success. Form a dedicated infrastructure team early to analyze target topography, distributions, loads, number of users, etc.; assess hardware needs; and identify performance bottlenecks. Analyzing the legacy system landscape and planning in advance for data migrations is crucial.Deployment Services
  3. Document all legacy business requirements. An implementation assessment with PLM experts and architects will help you understand how solution capabilities align with existing business processes and requirements. Documenting use cases and scenarios defines what will be supported and what is out of scope, ensuring goals are understood and met while minimizing late-cycle changes that cause delays and cost overruns.
  4. Establish a detailed governance plan that defines responsibilities and interfaces. A well-orchestrated governance plan ensures implementation timelines remain realistic and goals are achieved. By defining the customer’s and vendor/vendors’ responsibilities in advance and how interfaces between those responsibilities will be managed, you’ll avoid conflicts that create delays.
  5. Evaluate the solution/business interface and process redesign. Customizing PLM to match existing processes complicates updates and Engineering  Servicesintegrations for years to come. Instead, focus on configuring the solution to fully tap its collaborative power. Remember: This is your best opportunity to redesign your processes to streamline work, remove waste and non-value added activities, and accelerate innovation.
  6. Plan for how to import/translate legacy data. Data migration is an extremely important part of any enterprise implementation. Understanding legacy systems and planning data migration is critical to implementation success.
  7. Build enough flex time into the schedule. Aggressive timelines are a fact of business today, but a too-aggressive schedule is a recipe for failure. Realistically identify project risks, then build adequate buffers into the schedule to accommodate unexpected issues and allow for adequate testing before go-live.
  8. Make extensive use of business cases and test steps; involve testers early and often. Plan enough hands-on system-test time to truly understand the scope and limitations. Define a test strategy that includes functional unit testing and integration and regression testing. Build a proper QA testing phase into the implementation timeline, and allow time to address any identified issues.Enablement  Services
  9. Assess staff readiness early to plan support and training. Timing is everything. Train too early and users forget what they learn before they can use it. Train too late and adoption lags. Test knowledge levels to ensure proficiency, and retrain as needed. Don’t assume your users will automatically know how to use the new system; even small changes can lead to big frustrations when the user cannot use the new functionality.
  10. Provide for production service/support. Implementation doesn’t end at go-live. Post-launch service and support ensures implementation goals and expectations are fully met as the number of users and quantity of data increases.

Developing and executing a deliberate implementation ensures you achieve the full value of the solution specific to your industry and business. 3DS Industry Services, in close collaboration with our ecosystem of regional and global services partners, can help customers define and launch their projects on the right trajectory to hit their targets for value, schedule and cost.

High Demand for New Solutions at BIM World 2015 in Paris

By Akio

In Paris, March 25-26, BIM World 2015 showcased a global vision of the life cycle, equipment, buildings, urban infrastructure, users, and services. This year’s theme was “Redesigning the Innovation Code.”

BIM World 2015

Tweet: High Demand for New Solutions at #BIMWorld 2015 in #Paris | @bim_world @Dassault3DS @AEC_Cafe #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/fnZzP+Click to tweet this article

The sold-out event attracted broad attendance from architects, designers and contractors, to those from government, other industries, and the general public. Following the 2014 European Directive on the use of digital processes in building information modeling (BIM), there was intense interest at BIM World 2015 in the new technologies being shown and the solutions available.

BIM World 2015 from Dassault Systemes

Many within the AEC industry in France recognize they are late adopting BIM industrialization compared to other countries. Attendees at BIM World in Paris showed high interest in these BIM solutions, driven by the current French housing and economic environment and a need to reduce building costs and increase efficiencies of construction projects.

French Minister Sylvia Pinel

Underscoring the importance of these endeavors, Sylvia Pinel, Minister of Housing, Equality Territories and Rural Affairs opened the roundtable, titled “The French Roadmap for the Digital Transition of Construction,” on Wednesday, 25 March. A digital revolution is taking place in the building industry, and “the term revolution is no exaggeration,” said Pinel.

Tweet: A digital revolution is taking place in France's building industry. #BIM #AEC @bimworld @AEC_Cafe http://ctt.ec/ta62C+Click to tweet: “A digital revolution is
taking place in France’s building industry.”

Popular Discussions

The many sessions and discussions held centered on BIM. It is clear that the building and construction industry in France is ready to adopt this technology. Attendees were actively exploring how to implement BIM and wanted to get into the specifics, such as:

  • Return on investment with BIM
  • How companies have successfully implemented BIM into their life cycles
  • When companies can expect to realize benefits after implementing BIM
  • New building efficiency through BIM
  • BIM for infrastructure
  • BIM as a marketing vehicle for construction and building projects

Solutions for BIM Showcased

Dassault Systèmes was well-positioned at the event. The company brings more than 30 years of knowledge, experience, and outstanding technology solutions from its work around the world and in other industries, such as aerospace, automotive, shipbuilding, and others.

The demonstrations presented at BIM World supported Dassault Systèmes’ reputation for expertise and excellence. Attendees were very excited to see these solutions. There was high demand and interest in how these solutions can help companies become more efficient to accelerate innovation.

Highlighted solutions included:

  • Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience –The solution provides a collaboration-based project backbone that enables centralized project and data management, construction simulation for better planning and execution, and the right information to be available to the right people at the right time.
  • Façade Design for Fabrication Industry Solution Experience – The solution connects your design data from concept through fabrication for collaborative, industrialized construction.
  • Building Energy Efficiency Solution, so called “Smart Building Experience” leveraging Dymola for simulation and Modelica for modeling – This experience showed the 3DS Campus building temperature changing as the sun moves east to west during the day.

“France is now pushing its adoption of BIM, and that came through at this year’s BIM World,” said Marty Doscher, Vice President, AEC Industry, Dassault Systèmes. “The excitement at the event was electric, and the discussions demonstrated a high level of understanding with BIM. We expect to see many more exciting projects in the years ahead!”

 

Tweet: #France is now pushing its adoption of #BIM, and that came through at this year's #BIMWorld | @AEC_Cafe @bim_world #AEC http://ctt.ec/Kw8GJ+ Click to tweet: “#France is now pushing its adoption of
#BIM, and that came through at this year’s #BIMWorld”


 

Related resources:

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction Solutions

Best Practice White Paper: End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3

Challenges to Designing Smarter Products

By Matthew

Meeting the Challenges to Designing Smarter Products with ENOVIA

Today’s cars carry more electronics and computing power than the Apollo spacecraft that flew to the moon. One of the leading pressures facing manufacturers today is the increasing market demand for “smarter” products: products that have more functionality are more user-friendly, and more environmental. Therefore, manufacturers are incorporating an ever increasing amount of electronics and embedded software in their products.

Collaboration Design

For example, there has been a dramatic growth of electronic content in the automotive industry. The proportion of electronics in passenger cars in 2007 was around 20%, but this figure is estimated to increase to about 40% by 2015. By 2015 electronic components will become the largest contributor to a car’s overall parts and material costs.

Demand for smarter products is quite the exciting trend that offers a lot of new opportunities for innovation, at the same time there are inherent challenges. Getting it right requires new approaches to developing products. Smart products often consist of an integrated system of mechanical components, electronics, and software. This requires the involvement of multiple engineering disciplines. According to a study by the Aberdeen Group, the best manufacturers seek to improve communication and collaboration across engineering disciples and increase the ability to predict system behavior prior to testing.

In particular there are certain behaviors which have negative impacts on the business of developing smart product:

  • Without significant early collaboration between the electrical and mechanical designs means that problems are addressed downstream when design changes are expensive and time consuming.
  • If the transfer of design constraints between design domains is manual and requires recreating data from scratch then there is unnecessary duplication of effort and risks of data inconsistencies.
  • When the design requires several iterations between the mechanical and electrical domains to stabilize the design, there is the chance that the design could be based on obsolete data which would lead to scrapping and rework late in the process.
  • If there is no automated way to notify the team of changes in mechanical or electrical design constraints, then design changes will be delayed increasing product time to market.

 

Costs Incurred

The impact of early life-cycle decisions on product realization is far reaching. As new products move through the sequential stages of product design to final production, the cost of engineering changes increases tremendously. A mistake that is discovered during the planning and design phase is comparatively inexpensive to fix. But if it is overlooked and discovered later during the process, such a mistake can cost manufacturers several thousand times more. By the time a mistake comes to actual manufacturing, for example, it could cost millions more to fix compared to what it would have cost if detected earlier.

According to Aberdeen Group, Best-in-Class manufacturer leverage PLM solutions to improve communication and collaboration across disciplines. However, the ECAD (Electrical) and MCAD (Mechanical) domains present a unique challenge that requires a unique solution.

Learn how Dassault Systèmes can help. Register here to watch the 10 minute ECAD EXPERIENCE webinar:  http://www.3ds.com/products-services/enovia/resources/enovia-ecad

Matthew J. Hall

Matthew J. Hall

Matthew Hall is the ENOVIA User Advocacy & Social EXPERIENCE Specialist.  You can find him on Twitter at @mjhall. Connect with ENOVIA at @3DSENOVIA

 



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