Challenges Driving the Industrialization of Construction

By Akio

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

A monumental and historical study conducted by the National Research Council of the National Academies on behalf of NIST outlined the challenges and obstacles facing the construction industry.

BREAKINGWITHTRADITION2-200x300

Fragmentation of the Industry

“The sheer number of construction firms (760,000 in 2004) and their size—only 2 percent had 100 or more workers, while 80 percent had 10 or fewer workers—make it difficult to effectively deploy new technologies, best practices, or other innovations across a critical mass of owners, contractors, and subcontractors.

Tweet: Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer. @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC http://ctt.ec/eTAeP+Click to tweet: “Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer.”

The industry is also segmented into least four distinct sectors—residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy construction.

Interconnectivity and Interoperability

  • Its diverse and fragmented set of stakeholders: owners, users, designers, constructors, suppliers, manufacturers, operators, regulators, manual laborers, and specialty trade contractors including plumbers, electricians, masons, carpenters, and roofers.
  • Its segmented processes: planning and financing, design, engineering, procurement, construction, operations, and maintenance. Each process involves different groups of stakeholders, and shifting levels of financial risk.
  • The image of the industry—work that is cyclical, low tech, physically exhausting, and unsafe—which makes it difficult to attract skilled workers.
  • The one-of-a-kind, built-on-site nature of most construction projects.
  • Variation in the standards, processes, materials, skills, and technologies required by different types of construction projects.
  • Variation in building codes, permitting processes, and construction-related regulations by states and localities.
  • Lack of an industry-wide strategy to improve construction efficiency.
  • Lack of effective performance measures for construction-related tasks, projects, or the industry as a whole.
  • Lack of an industry-wide research agenda and inadequate levels of funding for research.

The industry is moving to address these challenges.

To learn how, download the white paper “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Heather Moore.

Tweet: How does the history of industrialization inform #AEC industry? @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @AgileConst http://ctt.ec/9cna5+Click to tweet: “How does the history of
industrialization inform #AEC industry?”

This post is an excerpt from the white paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and Dr. Heather Moore. Commissioned by Dassault Systemes and prepared by MCA Inc., this whitepaper focuses on industrialization of construction industry.

It maps out the construction industry challenges, relates the history of industrialization in the manufacturing industry, and summarizes five critical aspects and approaches.

 

Tweet: Challenges Driving the Industrialization of #Construction | @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/0eQKb+Click to tweet this article

 


Related resources:

Lean Construction Industry Solution Experience

Download Lean Construction Solution Brief

White Paper: Industrialization of the Construction Industry

MCA® Website

Improve Part Search and Reuse in Aerospace & Defense Programs: The Path to Significant Productivity and Quality Improvements

By Ellen

According to industry analysts Aberdeen Group, the annual carrying costs of introducing a new part number range between $4,500 and $23,000 per item. When a designer or engineer decides to create a new part instead of searching to see whether it already exists, significant expenses can be incurred. In product development alone, new part designs have to be analyzed, validated, and prototyped, steps that can consume valuable R&D resources and delay time-to-market. Moreover, by making something new instead of utilizing tried-and-tested designs, new part development can increase the risk of problems related to quality and manufacturability.

Reusing existing parts instead of creating new is not a new problem. Most companies have put in place a system for doing so. But do companies realize the value of carrying over even small, high-volume standard parts? Carrying these parts can be astoundingly costly. For example, a large aerospace supplier discovered that 10% of the brackets required for a plane’s nose cone were identical. Reusing these parts led to 10,000 hours saved and reallocated to more high-value projects. Other savings were realized by avoiding testing, administration, sourcing, storage and other expenses. They saved about €500,000 in engineering capacity in only 2 months!

Clearly, by leveraging existing designs, every aspect of a manufacturing enterprise and extended supply chain—including product design, engineering, documentation, procurement, purchasing, manufacturing, inventory, distribution, service, sales, marketing, and management—will become more efficient, improving quality while accelerating time-to-market, which can lead to more satisfied and loyal customers.

But what’s the best way to carry over? There are a number of search applications on the market. Those based solely on shape have shortcomings, which limit their ability to meet the search needs of today’s manufacturing enterprises. Shape search packages typically support geometry searches from within the specific CAD, PLM, or software application, and fail to tap into an organization’s extended data trove of product information. Finding the CAD file is not enough, as it’s not possible to know whether that part was actually produced, or maybe only created by a student during a training period at the organization.

What’s really needed is a solution structured to search and capture information. A key aspect of Engineered to Fly, an industry solution experience for small and medium-sized aerospace companies, EXALEAD OnePart, provides the structure for users to search and capture all the relevant information to reuse parts. The powerful search capability finds the CAD file and gathers all existing part-related information no matter the format. The rich search capabilities add similarity, metadata, and semantic-linked documents and related information—through an integrated search experience that mirrors the manner in which popular Internet search engines and user-friendly ecommerce applications operate. Users throughout the organization, whether savvy with CAD technology or not, are able to quickly discover if a part exists by simply shortlisting the possible designs, comparing them, checking their similarity, navigating parent/child relationships, and assembling related documents to revitalize the product development enterprise.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

How Does OnePart Help Engineering?

Aberdeen estimates that 44% of an engineer’s time is spent searching for or recreating parts. With OnePart, designers and engineers will be more productive devoting more time to innovative new projects, delivering them faster. These productivity improvements will extend beyond product development while alleviating the informational demands on designers and engineers. Because colleagues in other departments do not need a CAD system to access data related to a part. they simply use their Web browser to quickly find any information they need to support other business functions. Users save time because it’s not necessary to contact product development for the information they need.

How does OnePart Help Manufacturing?

Incorporating an existing part that has already passed quality reviews into a new product is a “known quantity” for the manufacturing team. Personnel and manufacturing time are saved, as are time and costs incurred by tooling. These resources can be used to increase the volume of existing products or reallocated to other projects.

How does OnePart Help Procurement?

A less obvious beneficiary of reducing duplicate parts is the purchasing department. Purchasing personnel are able to search the ERP and associate its contents with documentation found in other systems. Reusing parts decreases stocking costs, leading to savings without damaging important relations with suppliers.

Engineered to Fly with EXALEAD OnePart Benefits

• Increased part reuse to speed program completion and part standardization
• Lower costs resulting from avoidance of duplicate part creation and release risk
• Higher engineering capacity to drive new innovation
• Enhanced performance to production and budget targets
• Increased quality and reduce time-to-market

Attending the Paris International Air Show? See EXALEAD OnePart featured as part the Engineered to Fly industry solution experience demonstrations.

Find out why the path to significant productivity and quality improvements starts with OnePart and Engineered to Fly. Based on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, Engineered to Fly ensures repeatability and reusability, allowing companies to reduce the time spent on tactical proposal management and freeing them to respond to more Requests for Quotes (RFQ) and Requests for Proposals (RFP) with improved accuracy on areas such as schedule and cost.
What kind of ROI is possible with Exalead OnePart? See the savings an aerospace company might achieve in this infographic.

Click to find out more information on Dassault Systems involvement at the International Paris Air Show in Le Bourget.

3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea BIM Momentum

By Akio

 

Global adoption of BIM is proceeding with great momentum, and within Asia many are rapidly adopting BIM practices. Korea is one country leading the way with BIM adoption, with dramatic growth year over year.

Dassault Systèmes recently made speeches at two events focused on driving adoption of BIM in Korea. Building on the strong interest in the region, the company delivered these two talks on BIM.

Digital Tools for Sustainable Cities

Ingeborg Rocker, Vice President, GEOVIA 3DEXPERIENCity | Globe, Dassault Systèmes, presented “3DEXPERIENCITY” at buildSMART Forum 2015 Seoul, Korea on April 16.

With a soaring global population, vast numbers of people face living in cities that are decades or centuries old, built for much smaller populations with very different needs. This puts our environment at risk by wasting resources such as land, water, and energy, and makes cities harder to manage logistically.

A diverse range of disciplines are helping to solve these challenges, aided by a suite of digital tools. These tools allow scientists and city planners to see and explore the futures we are creating and their effects on their inhabitants and the planet as a whole.

Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCity | Geosphere project aims to create holistic, virtual models that enable urban planners to digitally study and test ideas. This will allow them to consider the impact urbanization has both within the invisible boundaries of their city.

This approach could lead to our reimagining of the entire discipline of architecture—With a focus not just on the resulting structure but also the impact a building will have on the entire planet and its resources.

Tweet: See how digital tools are leading to sustainable cities @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @3dsEXALEAD #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/0a43N+Click to tweet: “See how digital
tools are leading to sustainable cities”

 

BIM’s Evolution to Building Lifecycle Management

Dongkeun Jang, Business Experience Consultant, 3DS Value Solutions, Korea, delivered a speech at the buildSMART Forum 2015 on April 16 and the 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM Korea on April 29.

Dongkeun Jang, Business Experience Consultant, 3DS Value Solutions, Korea

Industrialization techniques have been commonly used in manufacturing industries for decades, and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) has also been widely utilized. Now the use of Industrialized Construction is expanding in the Architecture, Engineering & Construction industry to help improve planning, design, construction, and assembly.

The benefits of this include increased sustainability, optimized operations, lower costs, and greater safety.

Tweet: optimized operations + sustainability + lower costs + greater safety = Industrialized Construction @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/Yde6H+Click to tweet: “optimized operations + sustainability +
lower costs + greater safety = Industrialized Construction”

With the growing adoption of BIM, companies can further benefit by implementing a Building Lifecycle Management (BLM) system. BLM puts into practice a BIM Level 3 approach that enables a highly efficient extended collaboration model based on PLM and manufacturing industry best practices.

 

To set the stage for true BLM, intuitive 3D design helps owners and architects communicate to confirm design directions and articulate design intentions.

It also builds a bridge to construction partners. 4D Virtual construction planning enables VDC mangers to evaluate better resource assignment and plan more efficient construction sequences.

EXALEAD OnePart helps owners and facility managers access specific facility information, whenever they want. Dongkeun demonstrated how projects can be managed by the 3DEXERIENCE Platform:

  • Segregated work break-down structures articulate project configurations
  • Project members can access dashboards of the latest information and project status
  • All communication is shared, communicated and recorded through the 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform

Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE® platform applications can be part of an integrated extended collaboration process, bringing together all project design and delivery elements for more productive projects.

 

Tweet: #3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea #BIM Momentum @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @3dsEXALEAD #AEC http://ctt.ec/u4qi1+Click to tweet this article

 

Akio Moriwaki

Akio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes’ head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART.


Related Resources:

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction

End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3



Page 1 of 22412345...102030...Last »
3ds.com

Beyond PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), Dassault Systèmes, the 3D Experience Company, provides business and people with virtual universes to imagine sustainable innovations. 3DSWYM, 3D VIA, CATIA, DELMIA, ENOVIA, EXALEAD, NETVIBES, SIMULIA and SOLIDWORKS are registered trademarks of Dassault Systèmes or its subsidiaries in the US and/or other countries.