Internet of Things: What’s the Big Idea?

By Estelle

 

 

Internet Of Things


Written by Hong Bai *

Starting from January 2013, right after Google announced its $3.2 Billion acquisition of NEST, the expression “Internet of Things”, known as IoT, has suddenly become the big buzz word in all different industries. Engineers and business leaders are having all kinds of discussion around this area over social media. And some among them did successfully transform their business by creating disruptive innovations based on IoT oriented technologies, such as Parrot or Withings.

However, among all those discussions and successful business cases, there is one question that was never clearly answered: what’s the big idea about internet of things? I think that everyone may have his/her own answer to this question and there does not exist an absolute definition to which we can look upon. I would like to share my own opinions about the true nature of IoT here.

First of all, to understand the term “internet of things”, we have to start with the word “things” that refers to the products that are enabling IoT usages. There are two important features about these products: mobility & connectivity. These two features have already served in many consumer and industry use cases , and their main purpose is: collecting live information from anywhere at any time. This leads us to the second important element of IoT – data.

When you have one device collecting information for you, the outcome of that process is called data. But when you have billions of connected devices that are collecting all different types of information for you, then it will become Big Data. In my opinion, Big Data is the derived content of IoT. Its purpose is to be analyzed in order to better understand the behaviors of systems or consumers. Once companies can identify the patterns and interrelations among different behaviors, which seem to be random or disordered, they can anticipate events or activities that will occur in the near future and build an offer to bring additional value to users. The best way to deliver such additional value is through services.

Service is the third important element of IoT. It is also the most profitable and valuable part of the entire IoT value chain. If product and data are about creating needs, services are usually designed to be the exact solution to satisfy those needs. For instance, if I have a product which collects information about one’s body weight, it will collect a huge amount of data about people’s weight. From those data, I find out that people will start looking for professional advices once their body weight is 30% above the average. It allows bringing fitness services offering to those people to satisfy their needs. This provides an extraordinary user experience to the end consumers.

Now, the answer to my previous question seems to be obvious, the big idea of IoT is to have connected devices collecting data for analysis, and offer exceptional services based on the result of the analysis, to create unique user experiences.

Are you Ready for the Internet Of Things? Join us at Solidworks World 2015 and attend the session “Mechatronics engineering experience for Smart Devices with SolidWorks”  on Monday Feb 9th  from 10.30  to 12.00 pm.

* Hong Bai is the High-Tech Industry Mechatronic System Design Consultant @ Dassault Systèmes. In his role, Hong is working with worldwide  leading Electronics companies to support their key business process transformation initiatives. 

Making Global Medical Device Product Innovation A Reality – Watch the Webinar Replay

By Helene

Technically and geographically diverse product development teams must work together more closely than ever to develop medical devices which will focus on the needs of patients and doctors globally. In order for medical device companies to compete, traditional voice of customer (VOC) approaches need to keep pace with healthcare consumers increasingly sophisticated product needs. Medical device product innovation can result from improved ideation which facilitates collaboration between all global stakeholders.

Medical device product development is a complex process involving research and development teams, designers, and the marketing and regulatory teams that gather requirements from customers and governing agencies. A 2012 report from Axendia titled “Walking the Tightrope: Balancing the Risks and Rewards of Med-Tech Globalization” highlights the opportunities and challenges posed by increasing globalization. Medical device product opportunities lie in growing global patient markets and working with outsourced partners in a more collaborative role. Challenges include increasing data visibility and analysis as well as keeping track of regulations for each region.

Smart Watch Design for the Life Sciences Industry

Smart Watch Design for the Life Sciences Industry

Dan Matlis, president of Axendia, was one of three speakers at Dassault Systèmes (3DS) sponsored webinar during the December 3rd (now available on replay) discussing results from this report as well as ways medical device companies can address them. The webinar titled “Learn How Leading Medical Device Organizations are Driving Innovation in a Global Marketplace”  also included Cathi Crist, Partner and leader of the Life Sciences practice at Kalypso where she educated viewers on how product lifecycle management (PLM) facilitates innovation. Rounding out the webinar was Stuart Karten of Karten Design, where he shared his firsthand insights on how leading medical device organizations are leveraging design and innovation to improve and create new products. Click here to watch the webinar replay.

Today’s global consumers develop strong and sometimes very personal reactions about the healthcare products they experience, and are quick to discuss their likes and dislikes via social media. These tweets, Facebook updates, and Instagram posts in turn create more discussion and opinions among their network and beyond. These data create a rich product development resource for medical device companies. Focus groups and surveys have always been used by companies to gauge needs of their customers, but they can be time intensive and expensive. Innovative medical device companies realize that listening to customers first, in real time, rather than being reactionary when complaints arise, will be the winning strategy. Indeed, putting patients and doctors first, and even involving them in the product development process, will result in more customer satisfaction and sales.

The Dassault Systèmes Ideation and Concept Design for Medical Device Industry Solution Experience redefines medical technology workflow via social collaboration. Powered by the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, it is the first cloud-based, all in one innovation management system. This solution was highlighted during the webinar, and in keeping with social collaboration, we hope you can join the discussion, and leave any comments or questions below.

The next industrial revolution: do more with less

By Catherine

Written by Catherine Bolgar*

Stylish robot assemble

Since the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries, we keep producing more, while working less. The digital age speeded up productivity even more. The next industrial revolution is likely to focus not just on doing more faster but also with fewer resources.

We have the same potential for a 10- to 15-fold increase in productivity that we saw in the Industrial Revolution,” says Stefan Heck, consulting professor at Stanford University and co-author of the book, “Resource Revolution: How to Capture the Biggest Business Opportunity in a Century.” In the Industrial Revolution, “it was labor productivity that improved. Now we can do that with resources. We have been improving in the past, but modestly—less than 1% for water to 1.5% for gas.”

Global population grew fourfold during the 20th century, while the volume of material extracted or harvested rose eightfold, according to “Sustainable Materials Management: Making Better Use of Resources,” a book by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

The approximately 2.5 billion people in emerging markets poised to join the middle class by 2030 are likely to increase consumption of everything from food to water to energy.

Doomsday predictions that we’ll run out of oil or other resources aren’t likely because technology keeps presenting new ways to access what we need. However, “we’ve already recovered the best resources,” Dr. Heck says. Those we haven’t yet tapped are “more expensive to recover—they’re deeper, farther offshore and lower quality.”

To meet global demand forecasts for 2030, we would need to boost gross domestic product per metric ton of materials by 1.3% a year, food yields per hectare by 1.5%, GDP per British thermal unit of energy 3.2% and GDP per cubic meter of water by 3.7%, he says.

Sir John Beddington, chief scientific adviser to the British government, made a similar forecast, saying that by 2030, the world will need 50% more food and energy and 30% more water to supply a population that’s growing by six million people per month.

Such substantial productivity increases can be achieved by “combining information technology, nanoscale materials science and biology with industrial technology,” Dr. Heck says. “The benefit is, if you have that level of productivity shift, there’s billions of wealth to be created.”

Dr. Heck lists five levers to produce the resource revolution:

  1. Reduce waste.
  2. Substitute with something more efficient. For example, auto makers are increasingly using lightweight composite materials or aluminum rather than steel to reduce fuel consumption. A switch from a gasoline-powered vehicle—only 30% efficient—to an electric vehicle—96% to 98% efficient—requires less energy. Plant-derived proteins can substitute for resource-intensive animal proteins, at least some of the time. “There are multiple wins—environmental benefits, cost benefits, consumer benefits, health benefits,” Dr. Heck says.
  3. Optimize, using sensors or controls to improve efficiency. Dr. Heck describes a steel plant that upgraded with sensors and robots. Workers who previously had to wear protective gear now manipulate the steel remotely from the safety of a control room. The plant cut energy use 20%-25% and increased output. Another example is using GPS and software to optimize delivery routes, saving time and fuel.
  4. Virtualize, turning physical goods into services or moving online. The number of miles driven, driver’s licenses issued and fuel used in the U.S. peaked in 2006, before the recession. That’s in part because people have shifted to online shopping and banking—“when you multiply fewer trips by the total population, you get significant savings,” Dr. Heck says. At the same time, banks, for example, save by not having to operate as many branches.
  5. Recycle, reuse and refurbish. A number of companies are taking old products, removing the parts that are still good to reprocess them and put into new products. “That changes the equation dramatically,” Dr. Heck says. “We had an economy where most products were used once and ended in a landfill.”

Mobile phones used to be used once and thrown away, but a number of services have sprung up to take back your old phone when you buy a new one, and to sell still-working phones in developing countries or to disassemble broken phones to recuperate materials. “There’s 100 times more gold per weight in phones than in a gold mine in Africa,” Dr. Heck says.

Lead-acid batteries are collected for reprocessing the lead, which constitutes the lion’s share of the cost of a new battery. By creating a closed loop for the lead, “there’s both an economic and a huge environmental benefit. If you look at what they’re doing, it’s a lead rental business,” he says.

Companies that profit from product sales need new business models to give them incentives to make their products more durable. “If cars are shared, then you’re making money on the use of the cars, not on the sales,” he says.

As waste is wrung from the industrial system, “things become cheaper, and we can have the same level of service or quality of life with fewer resources,” Dr. Heck says. “We would spend less, and from an environmental point of view have an economy that’s still delivering growing GDP but with far less energy.”

*For more from Catherine, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join The Future Realities discussion.



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